AuctionZip Forum
It is currently Tue Jun 02, 2015 9:44 am
Visit AuctionZip.com for
Live Auctions

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Dec 21, 2007 2:21 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 16, 2007 5:51 am
Posts: 19
Hello:
Ditto what Mr. Burke said.

What happens when the oldest, best buyers have all died off or become strictly sellers as they need to down-size? This is something all of us in this profession will face.

_________________
David P. Whitley CAI CES
Colorado Champion Auctioneer

Rocky Mountain Estate Brokers Inc.
Rocky Mountain Estate Brokers Realty LLC

Professional Auctioneers, Innovative Technologies.

http://www.whitleyauction.com

http://www.rmebrealty.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Dec 21, 2007 8:09 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 16, 2007 5:52 am
Posts: 2437
Location: Houston TX
David P. Whitley CAI CES wrote:
What happens when the oldest, best buyers have all died off or become strictly sellers as they need to down-size? This is something all of us in this profession will face.
If that's what I am going to have to worry about, then we're in much bigger trouble, in the first place. Think about it... the auction industry has been around for how many thousands of years?

I don't think that is really going to be a concern to the auction profession... not as long as people keep reproducing and buying and selling. There will always be someone else that will take the place of each of us, as time goes on... and mankind, as well as the auction industry will survive, just as it has always done.

Jim Ford

_________________
Texas-National Auctioneers
Professional Auction Services for Houston & the Great State of Texas
Personal Estate - Business Liquidation - Real Estate - Charity Fundraisers

http://www.t-na.com
281-479-7848


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 1:44 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 16, 2007 5:52 am
Posts: 4
In one of the continuing edeucation lectures from an official of the state licensing board (for Illinois, my state) we were clearly told we cannot pay a finder's or referral fee for auction business. That is in Illinois (and according to this one official)...check you local regulations.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2008 11:44 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 21, 2008 3:45 pm
Posts: 4
For a few years now we have always paid a 10% finders fee, It works for us! We get alot of calls that way, some really suck but on occasion :D

Jm


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2008 1:05 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 16, 2007 5:51 am
Posts: 297
Location: Branchville NJ
I paid a finder fee one time, the whole deal was weird (I didn't like it) I think now that if I pay a finders fee I would be throwing money away, chances are I would get the job any way. If someone in the know finds out about the job before me & runs to tell me about it they get 10%? It just dont feel rite to me.

Now if some one sends me work & I feel indebted to them I may send them out to a nice restaurant with a $200-$500 night out or to a spa or some thing.

Its funny that if you treat a potential client lunch or some thing it can be considered a tax write off. Is this the same if you are trying to make a potential referer call on you for the next time they have work for you?

_________________
Marc Lordi
Castners Auction, Appraisal & Appraisal Service LLC.
6 Wantage Ave Branchville NJ 07826
http://www.castners.com
973-948-3868
948-3919 (fax)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 9:56 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 16, 2007 5:51 am
Posts: 378
Location: Charleston, SC
Mike. First it is interesting that a co-worker is in competition with you. I can only assume you are talking about co-workers in a different job you work.
What it sounds like is the coworker is saying he does not want to do the work but would like some reward for sending you the business. If he is sending you decent stuff then I don't have a problem giving the guy a check for a few % of the sale. If you don't want to do a % then look over the stuff and get the guy a number you will pay him if you get the job. That way you don't reveal the total consignee sales. Be professional and do not go behind the guys back after he gives you the lead. Even if it is months later. Could be you include requirements like he has to help box the stuff up etc. Then you take the expense as day-labor.

_________________
I'm not an expert; I just play one on the Internet!

Regards, Ed Roumillat
Charleston, SC
er @ a-a.com
WWW.A-A.COM


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2008 9:56 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2008 3:30 pm
Posts: 4
Ed Roumillat wrote:
What it sounds like is the coworker is saying he does not want to do the work...


Someone who sells on eBay does not automatically equate to "not wanting to do the work". I know you "live auctioneers" smirk, sneer and snarl up your lips at eBay sellers but it's like any other business: to be successful and last for the long haul takes work and knowledge. It's two completely different venues.

Sounds to me like the "co-worker" in the story was offering to steer business to the original poster and understandably wants to be compensated for that and that's all that can reliably be deduced as far as his motivation. There's been times I've done the same; not because I was too lazy to sell the stuff myself but because the stuff was the kind of stuff that really needs to be viewed in person (in fairness to the seller and to buyers) and as such, can be a hard sale on eBay.

Also, depending on the number of the items to be sold, the owner might not want to see the sale dragged out over a few weeks or months as is often the case with eBay selling but would rather have it all said, sold and done in one or two sales.

Another scenario has been the reciprocal situation where an auctioneer friend steered someone to me because that person had the sort of collectible that simply would not bring at a live local auction the sort of money I got for it selling it on eBay to a 'targeted' audience. Likewise, whenever someone contacts me about consigning something that I feel would be better handled in a live auction setting (for whatever reason) I steer them to my auctioneer buddies.

In short, there are all kinds of reasons that someone might offer a lead on some very desirable items besides simply "not wanting to do the work".


Last edited by Charles Ray - 1 on Tue Nov 11, 2008 10:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2008 10:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2008 3:30 pm
Posts: 4
Mike Murphy wrote:
When someone asks me who do you use for your auto mechanic? I do not call up and the mechanic first and ask how much he can cut me in for by sending someone to him with their car repairs. Or, Can you recommend a good Vet for our pets? I normally do so based on helping the person with their needs and know that I am putting my reputation as a friend and as a professional on the line in doing so.


Not the same thing. In your first post, you described how the person who claimed to have two good leads stated that an alternative was that he would list the items for those people on his eBay site. So by referring you to the people with the goods, he would be cutting himself out of an opportunity for a business transaction that he could have performed. In the case of you referring a veterinarian to a friend, I presume you don't claim to ALSO be a veterinarian as well as an auctioneer do you? So if you're not a veterinarian, when you recommend a vet (or whoever) to someone, you're not cutting yourself out of business you could have had.

That said, if I recommend a veterinarian, by the same token I'd like to know that he would reciprocate and likewise refer potential customers to me.

Mike Murphy wrote:
It occurred to me that when my coworker lists items for people as an Ebay Trading Assistant, that Ebay does not pay him anything for him referring his customers to have him sell for them on their site. Ebay charges for their services and he must still do the work of listing and arranging shipping for himself.


I don't know any other way to say it and not trying to be rude but I really don't think you understand how eBay works. As far as eBay paying the Seller-Trading Assistant a "referral fee" for him having brought customers to eBay, you've really got it turned around. The customers (the merchandise owners) were ALREADY at eBay- that's where they got the Trading Assistant's contact information. In that respect, eBay's "role" in a Trading Assistant situation is actually closer to that of your coworker who is offering to bring you business.

eBay brought business to the Trading Assistant that he probably would not otherwise have. eBay's compensation occurs through listing fees and Final Value Fees when the Trading Assistant makes a deal with the merchandise owners to sell their stuff; just like your coworker's wish to be compensated if you make a deal with the merchandise owners to sell their stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Dec 27, 2008 12:42 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Sep 16, 2007 5:56 am
Posts: 1
As a dealer, I am happy to pay a finders fee if I am lead to good merchandise.
If an auctioneer does not see the difference betwen an auction lot and someone going to a mechanic, he is the wrong auctioneer. If an auctioneer does not see "enough profit" in the deal I bring him, he has no vision.
If a deal is worth taking, it is worth paying a spliff.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group