Auction Information

American Historical Ephemera and Photography,

Tue Feb 27 - 10:00AM


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  • [TRUTH, SOJOURNER (1797-1883)]. CDV of

    [TRUTH, SOJOURNER (1797-1883)]. CDV of

  • [DOUGLASS, Frederick (1818-1895)].

    [DOUGLASS, Frederick (1818-1895)].

  • [DOUGLASS, Frederick (1818-1895)].

    [DOUGLASS, Frederick (1818-1895)].

  • [DOUGLASS, Frederick (1818-1895)].

    [DOUGLASS, Frederick (1818-1895)].

Lot: 1 - [TRUTH, SOJOURNER (1797-1883)]. CDV of Sojourner Truth with flowers. Uncredited: Michigan, 1864.

[TRUTH, SOJOURNER (1797-1883)]. CDV of Sojourner Truth with flowers. Uncredited: Michigan, 1864. 2 3/16 x 3 3/8 in. CDV on cardstock mount (toning, some spotting, clipping to mount corners, verso with adhesive wear/discoloration). Printed caption to recto: "I Sell the Shadow to Support the Substance. / Sojourner Truth." Verso with copyright imprint: "Entered according to the act of Congress in the year 1864, by Sojourner Truth, in the Clerk's Office, of the US District Court for the Eastern District of Mich." Truth appears seated at a table with flowers, engaged in knitting. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 2 - [DOUGLASS, Frederick (1818-1895)]. ROBERTS, J.B., photographer. CDV of Frederick Douglass. Rochester, NY, ca 1867.

[DOUGLASS, Frederick (1818-1895)]. ROBERTS, J.B., photographer. CDV of Frederick Douglass. Rochester, NY, ca 1867. 2 1/4 x 3 7/8 in. CDV on cardstock mount (print with toning, light surface soil, and possibly clipped upper edge; mount with light edge/corner wear). Roberts' 58 State Street imprint to verso. Douglass is pictured wearing a dark jacket over a stark white collar, looking toward the camera, his hair having developed a fair amount of gray. Possibly a previously unknown image captured during the same sitting as the image catalogued as #57 (with alternate vignetting and subtle differences) in Picturing Frederick Douglass, with unknown photographer. That image is held at the Rochester Public Library. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 3 - [DOUGLASS, Frederick (1818-1895)]. WARREN, George Kendall (1824-1884), photographer. Cabinet card of Frederick Douglass.

[DOUGLASS, Frederick (1818-1895)]. WARREN, George Kendall (1824-1884), photographer. Cabinet card of Frederick Douglass. 4 x 5 1/2 in. cabinet card on cardstock mount (indentation at each corner of print/mount, some toning). Lower margin of mount includes blindstamp of "G.W. Thorne, New York," and period inked identification. Warren's Boston and Cambridgeport, Massachusetts imprint on mount verso. Douglass is pictured with white hair and a full beard wearing a fringed tie. Picturing Frederick Douglass notes that the image was taken by George Kendall Warren and was published in Boston ca 1879. Stauffer, Trodd, and Bernier, Picturing Frederick Douglass, cat. #99. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 4 - [DOUGLASS, Frederick (1818-1895)]. [BOURDON, DENIS, attrib]. Albumen photograph of Frederick Douglass. [Boston, MA], [1894].

[DOUGLASS, Frederick (1818-1895)]. [BOURDON, DENIS, attrib]. Albumen photograph of Frederick Douglass. [Boston, MA], [1894]. 3 7/8 x 5 7/16 in. mounted albumen photograph (all edges clipped, few spots and surface abrasions). Uncredited, though the pose is nearly identical to Plate 56 (cat #153) in Picturing Frederick Douglass, which is credited to Denis Bourdon, Notman Photographic Company, Boston. 10 May 1894. Douglass sat for a portrait at the Notman studio when he visited Boston on 10 May 1894 for the purpose of giving an address at the People's Church on Boylston Street. The Notman Photographic Company sent the products of the sitting on 29 May, with several copies. Denis Bourdon became the chief photographer and manager at that Notman's location in 1880, eventually becoming president of the company in 1918. (Picturing Frederick Douglass: An Illustrated Biography of the Nineteenth Century's Most Photographed American. New York: Liveright Publishing Corporation, 2015.) This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 5 - [DOUGLASS, Frederick (1818-1895)]. [WARREN, George Kendall (1824-1884), attrib.] Silver gelatin cabinet card of Frederick Douglass. [Boston, MA], [ca 1879].

[DOUGLASS, Frederick (1818-1895)]. [WARREN, George Kendall (1824-1884), attrib.] Silver gelatin cabinet card of Frederick Douglass. [Boston, MA], [ca 1879]. 4 x 5 1/2 in. cabinet photograph on cardstock mount (toning, several stray markings, wear to mount, modern adhesive remnants and surface loss to verso). Uncredited yet identical pose to Plate 42 (cat #98) in Picturing Frederick Douglass, which is a CDV by George Kendall Warren, ca 1879. Warren was active in Massachusetts from 1851-1881, based in Lowell until moving to Boston in 1870. His Washington Street studio opened in 1872, and he specialized in college class photos and portraits of famous figures. (Picturing Frederick Douglass: An Illustrated Biography of the Nineteenth Century's Most Photographed American. New York: Liveright Publishing Corporation, 2015) This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 6 - DOUGLASS, Frederick (ca 1818-1895). Land indenture involving the Freedman's Savings and Trust Company. Washington, DC, 4 June 1883. Signed by John Jay KNOX, Charles J. FOLGER, and Frederick DOUGLASS.

DOUGLASS, Frederick (ca 1818-1895). Land indenture involving the Freedman's Savings and Trust Company. Washington, DC, 4 June 1883. Signed by John Jay KNOX, Charles J. FOLGER, and Frederick DOUGLASS. 3 1/2 pages, 8 x 12 1/2 in. (pages fully separated along horizontal creases, some with taped repair, and toning and spotting to some areas). Asa Whitehead purchases multiple lots of land in Washington, DC from the Freedman's Savings and Trust Company, with Jay Knox acting as that company's commissioner, for the sum of $3,334.50. President Garfield appointed Frederick Douglass recorder of deeds for the District of Columbia in 1881. During his tenure, a white woman named Helen Pitts served as his secretary. The two were married in 1884, causing controversy among Douglass's friends and family, as well as the public. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 7 - DOUGLASS, Frederick (ca 1818-1895). The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, Written By Himself. His Early Life as a Slave, His Escape From Bondage, and His Complete History of the Present Time. Hartford, CT: Park Publishing Co., 1882.

DOUGLASS, Frederick (ca 1818-1895). The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, Written By Himself. His Early Life as a Slave, His Escape From Bondage, and His Complete History of the Present Time. Hartford, CT: Park Publishing Co., 1882. 8vo. 18 illustrations. (Front free endpaper, face title, and title page present but fully separated from spine edge, loose hinge, occasional spotting, some toning to free front end paper and tissue guard.) Blindstamped cloth lettered in gilt on spine (scuffing, edge and corner wear). Front free endpaper identified to "W.S. Morris." An early reprint of Frederick Douglass' final autobiography, first published in 1881. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 8 - [AFRICAN AMERICANA - EDUCATION]. A group of 3 cabinet photographs of Yale University's African American staff, incl. the "College Sweeps." Montreal, Toronto, and Halifax: William Notman Co., [1872].

[AFRICAN AMERICANA - EDUCATION]. A group of 3 cabinet photographs of Yale University's African American staff, incl. the "College Sweeps." Montreal, Toronto, and Halifax: William Notman Co., [1872]. 4 x 5 1/2 in. albumen photographs on cardstock mounts, each with imprint on mount recto and verso of William Notman (1826-1891). Provenance: Cowan's Auctions, The Road West: The Steve Turner Collection of African Americana, Part I, Lot 88. An impressive trio of cabinet photographs of African American staff members of Yale University from a series of photographs taken in New Haven, CT, by William Notman's company for the 1872 yearbook. Included in the group is a beautifully composed shot of six African American men who served as the custodial staff at the university. This group, known as the "College Sweeps," included Carter Wright, the son of an A.M.E. minister, and George T. Livingston, who served in the 29th Connecticut Infantry during the war and who was active in Republican politics. Three men in suits stand at the back, two sit in chairs tilted towards the center, with the sixth man seated on the floor wears a knit cardigan sweater. -- A vignette portrait of an unidentified staff member sporting a goatee and wearing a suit. -- A full-length portrait of a fruit merchant wearing knee-length boots next to his vendor’s basket. William Notman was a Scottish-Canadian photographer with an international reputation. He was based in Montreal but had several studio locations and maintained seasonal branches at both Harvard and Yale to capitalize off of the student populations. While Notman was a prolific photographer, examples with people of color are exceedingly scarce. The apparently unique images do not appear in the McCord Collection. Together, 3 cabinet photographs in fine condition, with some light toning and minor fading to margins. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 9 - ALLEN, Macon B. (1816-1894). Two documents related to Macon Allen, the first African American licensed to practice law in the US. Charleston, SC, 1877.

ALLEN, Macon B. (1816-1894). Two documents related to Macon Allen, the first African American licensed to practice law in the US. Charleston, SC, 1877. Partly-printed document signed ("Macon B. Allen, Probate Judge"). Charleston, SC, 29 March 1877. 8 1/2 x 13 3/4 in. (creased, few separations at creases, toning). Docketed verso. Document is a Warrant of Appraisement for Administration, of the estate of Sarah Ann Carter, by Gilbert Carter of the Charleston Railroad offices. Partly-printed document signed ("W. M. Muckenfuss"). Charleston, SC, 27 August 1877. 8 1/2 x 14 in. (creased, a significant separation along one crease and chipping to edges/corners, toning). Docketed verso. Document is an Execution Against Property citing the City Council of Charleston as the Plaintiff and Macon B. Allen as the Defendant. Allen is ordered to pay $146.02 "with interest thereon from the fourth day of June 1877." An interesting pair of documents in which Macon B. Allen appears in the role of Probate Judge and Defendant. Born free in Indiana, Macon Bolling Allen, became the first African American to be licensed to practice law in the United States, as well as the first African American Justice of the Peace. After passing the bar exam in Maine and earning his recommendation, he was given a license to practice law on 3 July 1844. Facing professional discrimination there, he moved to Boston, Massachusetts where he passed that state's bar exam in 1845, and later became the Justice of the Peace for Middlesex County in 1848. After the Civil War, he moved to Charleston, SC, where he was elected judge of the Inferior Court in 1872. Soon after, he was elected as Probate Judge for Charleston County. Allen moved to Washington, DC after the Reconstruction Era, working as an attorney for the Land and Improvement Association. He continued to practice law until his death at age 78. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 10 - [EDUCATION]. WASHINGTON, Booker T. (1856-1915). ALS as Principal of Tuskegee Institute on school letterhead. 17 April 1913.

[EDUCATION]. WASHINGTON, Booker T. (1856-1915). ALS as Principal of Tuskegee Institute on school letterhead. 17 April 1913. 8 1/2 x 10 5/8 in. (visible), matted to 13 x 20 in. Creasing, spotting, taped to ma on verso. On The Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute letterhead. Washington writes to Mr. Julien O. Ellinger of the Army & Navy Club in New York, NY referencing an enclosed circular (not included in this lot) regarding the institution's accomplishments and financial needs. He reminds Mr. Ellinger that "There are few institutions in the country where students do more to help themselves than is true here; they provide the cost of their board, books, traveling expenses, clothing, etc., but are unable to pay the cost of tuition which is $50.00 a year." Washington then closes by asking for a contribution toward the scholarship fund. [With:] 12 postcards (mostly printed) related to Booker T. Washington and Tuskegee Institute, mostly featuring views around the Tuskegee campus including Court Square, Carnegie Library, the Trade Building, John A. Andrew Hospital, Rockefeller Hall, and more. -- One stereoview featuring Booker T. Washington with several white educators and philanthropists including Charles W. Eliot, Andrew Carnegie, Robert C. Ogden, George McAneny, H.B. Trissel, Lyman Abbot, and J.G. Phelps Stokes. -- Together 13 images.

Lot: 11 - [EDUCATION]. HYMAN, photographer. A group of 6 photographs of Tuskegee Institute buildings and grounds, incl. the Wayside Inn and Dairy Barn. Ca early 1900s.

[EDUCATION]. HYMAN, photographer. A group of 6 photographs of Tuskegee Institute buildings and grounds, incl. the Wayside Inn and Dairy Barn. Ca early 1900s. 6 vintage photographs, 10 x 8 in. (including margins) (toning, occasional spotting, some with small holes to margins, some with chipping and loss to edges). Each print is numbered in the negative, and 3 of the 6 prints are credited in the negative to "Hyman Photo." Each with typed label stapled to margin identifying the location. Locations/scenes include: "'Wayside Inn' -- One of the First Dormitories." -- "The Dairy Barn." -- "The Power Plant." -- "Students' project work in agriculture." -- "Some of the swine heard [sic]." -- "Cabbage Patch - Truck Garden Division" (few holes near top right corner of print). Booker T. Washington founded the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute in 1881, serving as its principal until his death in 1915. The school instilled Washington’s principles of providing practical training for African Americans and helping them develop economic independence through the mastery of agricultural skills and manual trades. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 12 - [EDUCATION]. Small vessel made by Tuskegee Institute student.

[EDUCATION]. Small vessel made by Tuskegee Institute student. Ceramic vessel with hand-painted flower, height 3 3/4 in., diameter approx. 3 1/2 in. at widest (light wear consistent with age and use). Marked on base, "Tuskegee Institute / Alabama - Hand Made / Decorated By Student." The Tuskegee Institute Pottery program was created in 1937 by sculptor and ceramicist Isaac Scott Hathaway (1872-1967), one of the founding members of the school's Department of Ceramics. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 13 - CARVER, George Washington (ca 1864-1943). Two TLsS ("G.W. Carver"), April and October 1936.[With:] POLK, Prentice H. (1898-1984), photographer. Photograph of George Washington Carver and Henry Ford, signed ("P.H. Polk"), ca 1920s.

CARVER, George Washington (ca 1864-1943). Two TLsS ("G.W. Carver"), April and October 1936.[With:] POLK, Prentice H. (1898-1984), photographer. Photograph of George Washington Carver and Henry Ford, signed ("P.H. Polk"), ca 1920s. A group of two typed letters, 20 April 1936, 1p, 8 1/2 x 11 in. (creasing at folds, toning), and 6 October 1936, 1p, 8 1/2 x 7 1/4 in. (creasing at folds, toning), both signed ("G.W. Carver"), as Director Research and Experiment Station, Tuskegee Institute, Alabama. Letters are addressed to Mr. Marvin Teel of Millerville, Alabama, on "Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute" letterhead. Accompanied by one mailing envelope with a 12 March 1936 cancellation from "Tuskegee Institute Alabama." Carver writes to Teel regarding his design for a "harrow," a cultivation tool, as well as other matters. [With:] POLK, Prentice Hall, photographer. 8 x 10 in. photograph of Dr. George Washington Carver meeting with Henry Ford, ca 1920s. Signed "P.H. Polk" at lower left. Born in Bessemer, Alabama, Polk studied photography under C.M. Battey at the Tuskegee Institute before moving to Chicago. Upon the death of his mentor Battey, Polk returned to the Institute ultimately serving from 1933-1938 as head of the Photography Department. Polk was the school's official photographer and maintained a studio in Tuskegee from 1939 until his retirement in the 1980s. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 14 - [EDUCATION]. A small collection of items related to Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute in Virginia including a diploma signed by William H. TAFT.

[EDUCATION]. A small collection of items related to Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute in Virginia including a diploma signed by William H. TAFT. 21 x 16 in. partly printed diploma, matted to 17 x 24 3/4 (toning, minor creasing). Signed by William Howard TAFT ("Wm H. Taft") as President of the Board of Trustees and James E. GREGG ("James E. Gregg") as Principal of the school. Hampton, VA, 28 May 1919. Diploma certifies that Bessie Parthenia Tucker completed a four year course at the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, maintaining a satisfactory standard of excellence in character and scholarship. 7 x 5 in. silver gelatin photograph, matted to 11 x 9 in. (taped to mat on verso, some silvering and toning to image). Group portrait of 10 African American young ladies seated on a staircase, one holds a basketball painted "Hampton '21" on her lap, and two hold up a banner reading "Girls Basketball / Class-Championship / Class '21 / H.N.A.I. / '17 / 1919 / '20 / '21" Approx. 1 13/16 x 3 1/4 in. silk ribbon (fraying to edges, some clipping or loss to lower edge). New York: Factory No. 7, ca 1910s. White letters on a blue field spell out "Hampton" beneath a blue, white, and gold seal with legend reading "Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute / 1865." This ribbon was part of a set of tobacco silks issued by Egyptienne Luxury, showcasing many famous colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. 18 printed postcards featuring the Hampton Institute campus including Memorial Church, Teachers' Club House, King's Chapel, Hospital for Boys, Ogden Hall, an aerial view of the campus, and many more. And one printed postcard featuring Hartshorn Hall at Virginia Union University in Richmond. -- Together, 19 printed postcards. Most postally used. The Hampton Institute, now Hampton University, began as a Normal school for African Americans in 1868. It has evolved into one of the nation's leading African American Universities. Among the school's famous alumni is Dr. Booker T. Washington, who established a similar program with the Tuskegee Institute after graduating. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 15 - [EDUCATION - EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. A group of 8 photographs, incl. Hampton University Students, ca 1910.

[EDUCATION - EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. A group of 8 photographs, incl. Hampton University Students, ca 1910. Photograph of a group of Hampton University students. Hampton, VA: Cheyne's Studio, ca 1910. 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. silver gelatin photograph on 12 1/2 x 14 in. cardstock mount (light toning to print, edge and corner wear to mount). Twenty students, of which six are women, one of whom appears to be

Lot: 16 - [EDUCATION]. A group of items related to identified historically black colleges and universities including Howard, Shaw, and Walden Universities. Ca 1888-1947.

[EDUCATION]. A group of items related to identified historically black colleges and universities including Howard, Shaw, and Walden Universities. Ca 1888-1947. A group of approx. 8 items, including the following: Autograph letter signed from Howard University President William W. Patton requesting financial aid be provided for one of the students. Washington, DC, 2 November 1888. 1 page, on Howard University letterhead, displayed together with a stereoview of Howard University (toning and occasional spotting to letter, upper portion of letter partially separated). [With:] A flyer for a football game between Shaw University and Lincoln University. -- Undated real photo postcard of the football team of Howard University. -- Graduation photo from Storer College of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. -- Wilberforce University photographic portrait addressed to Miss Helen L. Byrd. -- Class of 1947 of Freedmen's Hospital School of Nursing composite photograph. Collection comprises the academics, athletics, and the financial aid that characterized African American institutions of higher learning. Condition generally good, with occasional toning as well as some edge and corner wear to items. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 17 - [EDUCATION - EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. A group of 9 photographs, incl. African American athletes and graduates of Ballard Normal School, Macon, GA.

[EDUCATION - EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. A group of 9 photographs, incl. African American athletes and graduates of Ballard Normal School, Macon, GA. 3 silver gelatin photographs of students at Ballard Normal School, each 8 x 10 in., on 13 1/2 x 11 1/2 in. cardstock mounts (toning, fading, soiling, surface abrasions to prints; corner and edge wear, including creasing, dampstaining, and loss to mounts). Includes 2 photographs of the 1919 and 1927 graduating classes at Ballard Normal School (as per inked notations). Both prints are credited to Woodall, Macon, GA. The 1919 class photograph includes period manuscript identifications on verso (some difficult to discern due to soiling). The third photograph features a portrait of the Ballard football team and coaches (significant loss to bottom edge of mount, partially impacting bottom edge of print). The player seated at center holds a football inscribed "City Champs," with date that appears to be "1926." Period manuscript identifications are included on verso. Established by the American Missionary Association in 1865 in Macon, GA, Ballard Normal School was a combined primary secondary school for the freedmen. During the early 20th century, it became primarily a college preparatory and normal training secondary school. In 1942, Ballard transitioned to a public school, and the American Missionary Association withdrew its financial support by 1945. [With:] 4 silver gelatin photographs, each 1 7/8 x 3 3/4 in., on original cardstock mount with photographer's imprint (light fading to prints; light spotting, corner and edge wear to mounts). Lincoln, NE: Townsend, 1913. A charming group of graduation photographs of female African American students. Three of the four subjects are identified on verso, and the period identifications indicate that they attended Lincoln High School in Lincoln, NE. [Also with:] 2 silver gelatin photographs showing an African American man and woman, presumably husband and wife, each 3 1/2 x 5 5/8 in. (sight), matted and housed in cardstock folder with the photographer's imprint (prints in very fine condition). [Harlem], NY: Wittels Studio, n.d., ca early 20th century. Together, 9 photographs, condition generally very good. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 18 - [EDUCATION - MALONE, ANNIE M. (1869-1957)]. A 1946 commencement program and marketing brochure for Poro College, Chicago, IL.

[EDUCATION - MALONE, ANNIE M. (1869-1957)]. A 1946 commencement program and marketing brochure for Poro College, Chicago, IL. Poro Commencement and Portrait Unveiling of Annie M. Malone "The Pioneer Beautician" / Sunday, July 22, 1946. [Chicago, IL], [1946]. 8vo, 24pp, 8 1/2 x 11 1/8 in. Staple-bound original wrappers (minor wear and discoloration; few pages partially disbound). Program includes halftone portraits of teachers and the 64 graduates of the class of July, 1946. Under each student's portrait is printed her name and her "ambition," "slogan," "aim," "aspiration," "hobby," or "song." Page 14 includes a "Foreward" by Minnie J. Foote to go along with the unveiling of a painted portrait of Malone, which was made to hang on the walls of Poro College. Additional photographs including that of Malone, dealers of Poro, and important African American leaders, likely those who contributed to the commissioning of the Malone portrait. 4 local businesses purchased 4 1/4 x 4 3/4 in. advertisement spaces at the end of the program. 3 7/8 x 7 in. Poro College brochure. [Chicago, IL], n.d. Includes a list of processes and topics taught at the school including sterilization, scalp cleansing, pressing, marcel waving, finger waving, beauty culture law, anatomy, arching, singeing, manicuring, salesmanship, and more; along with entrance requirements and tuition and lodging costs for the school. Annie Minerva Turnbo Malone was an enterprising businesswoman and philanthropist becoming one of the first black millionaires. At a young age, she developed her own concoctions and formulas designed for black hair. In 1900 she began to manufacture her “Wonderful Hair Grower.” In 1917, she began the construction of Poro College which expanded her manufacturing facilities but also contained the first American school of black cosmetology. The business employed over 175 people, including a commission agent named Sarah Breedlove, later known as Madam C.J. Walker, before she left to found her own rival manufacturing company. The college would go on to create jobs for nearly 75,000 women across the world through its school and franchise business. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 19 - [WOMEN]. A group of items associated with African American women, including booklets from the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Heritage Series.

[WOMEN]. A group of items associated with African American women, including booklets from the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Heritage Series. Collection of the first five editions of the "Heritage Series." Chicago: Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., 1968-1972. No. 1: "Negro Women in the Judiciary," 24pp; No. 2: "Women in Politics," 35pp; No. 3 "Women in Business," 24pp; No. 4: "Women in Medicine," 32pp; and No. 5: "Women in Dentistry," 27pp. Each booklet 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. and containing black and white photographs (condition of booklets generally good with some light toning to covers and light wear). [With:] Black and white international press photo of Shirley Chisolm, 4 3/4 x 6 3/4 in., with Camera Press Ltd. of London stamp and sticker on verso identifying Chisolm as the "first Negro Congresswoman." 30 June 1969. Chisolm was elected in 1968 to serve as the Congresswoman for New York's 12th congressional district. -- "The Great Beautiful Black Women Collection. Portraits by Paul Collins." Chicago: Johnson Products Co., 1978. 34pp, 8 1/2 x 1 1 in. (wear, scratching, and creasing to cover, light toning). Features portraits and biographies of famous Black women from throughout history, including Phillis Wheatley, Harriet Tubman, Madame C.J. Walker, Marian Anderson, Rosa Parks, and Coretta Scott King. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 20 - [EDUCATION - SPELMAN SEMINARY]. 3 items related to Spelman Seminary in Atlanta, GA.

[EDUCATION - SPELMAN SEMINARY]. 3 items related to Spelman Seminary in Atlanta, GA. 25 3/4 x 5 1/2 in. printed photographic presentation for Spelman Seminary (partially taped to mat on verso, some light creasing and soiling throughout). Featuring a large halftone group portrait of the students and teachers of Spelman on campus grounds, credited to Thompson Photo Co. of Poughkeepsie, NY and captioned "Spelman Seminary 1912 - 13" in the original negative. View of likely the entire enrollment at Spelman with multiple college buildings visible in background. Typed letter with facsimile signature ("Florence M. Read"). Atlanta, GA, 11 Mach 1939. 8 1/2 x 11 in. (creasing). On "Spelman College / Office of the President" letterhead. Letter outlines the importance of Spelman and solicits donations toward the Clara Howard Student Loan Fund. Florence Read served as President of Spelman College from 1927-1953. 3 7/8 x 7 1/2 in. promotional card for Spelman Seminary, "The Best School in the World for Negro Girls" (heavy creasing with some separation to creases, adhesive residue to verso). Features a halftone image of the campus at top, with training programs and instructions for receiving more information below. At bottom, text announces that the "School Opens October 5, 1915," though ink edits have changed the date to "September 30, 1919." Various unrelated ink inscriptions to verso. The Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary was founded on 11 April 1881 to be a school specifically for Black freedwomen. The name was later changed in honor of the abolitionist family of John D. Rockefeller's wife, the Spelmans, in 1884. The college awarded its first degrees in 1901, and is the oldest private historically Black liberal arts institution for women in the United States. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 21 - [EDUCATION]. A pair of portraits of the Fisk Jubilee Singers [with:] photograph of the Fisk University graduating class of 1928.

[EDUCATION]. A pair of portraits of the Fisk Jubilee Singers [with:] photograph of the Fisk University graduating class of 1928. 5 x 3 1/4 in. mounted albumen photograph (great tonality, few surface spots; mount with toning, spotting, and wear/loss to edges and corners). N.p., ca 1876. A formal group portrait of the Fisk Jubilee Singers, including Maggie Porter, E.W. Watkins, H.D. Alexander, F.J. Loudin, Thomas Rutling, Jennie Jackson, Mabel Lewis, Ella Sheppard, Maggie Carnes, and America W. Robinson. This portrait was commissioned by Queen Elizabeth while the singers were in London. 2 1/4 x 3 5/8 in. CDV on cardstock mount (toning, spotting, few stray marks; mount with discoloration and wear to edges and corners). Verso bears imprint: "American Missionary Association / Jubilee Singers, / Fisk University, Nashville, Tenn." There is one less subject in this portrait than the one above. 13 1/4 x 10 in. composite silver gelatin photograph (toning, soiling, abrading to surface obscuring at least one portrait, tearing and loss to edges and corners). [Tennessee]: Schumacher Studio, ca 1928. Photograph features more than 60 oval portraits of individual members of the "Graduating Class of 1928 / Fisk University." Established three years after the issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation, Fisk University was the first American university purposed to provide a liberal arts education to African American students. Due to diminished funding the institution soon struggled financially, leading a group of nine students to form an a capella group in hopes of raising money. The vocalists, many of whom were formerly enslaved, became known as the Fisk Jubilee Singers. Their performances (including most notably at the White House for Ulysses S. Grant and at Buckingham Palace for Queen Victoria) introduced audiences across the world to African American spirituals such as "Go Down Moses," "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot," and "Did the Lord Deliver Daniel," with inspiring results. Mark Twain, who was a frequent audience member of the Jubilee Singers, wrote of the experience: "I was reared in the South, & my father owned slaves, & I do not know when anything has so moved me as did the plaintive melodies of the Jubilee Singers. It was the first time for twenty-five or thirty years that I had heard such songs, or heard them sung in the genuine old way—& it is a way, I think, that white people cannot imitate—& never can, for that matter, for one must have been a slave himself in order to feel what that life was & so convey the pathos of it in the music." While the original group disbanded in 1878, a new version was created in 1879 including some original members. The Fisk Jubilee Singers continue to perform to this day, building on and promoting the legacy of the original singers who used their common heritage and talent to support their groundbreaking institution nearly 150 years ago. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 22 - [EDUCATION]. A group of 21 assorted photographs of school, church, and musical groups including the Mills Blue Rhythm Band.

[EDUCATION]. A group of 21 assorted photographs of school, church, and musical groups including the Mills Blue Rhythm Band. Group of 21 silver gelatin photographs, ca 1900-1950, including some mounted on cardstock, ranging in size from approx. 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. to 22 x 14 in. Most identified to various school groups via mount recto and verso inscriptions. Conditions vary, but generally fair, with toning, creasing, some significant mount wear or loss being present in several. Highlights include: On-stage silver gelatin portrait of the "Mills Blue Rythm [sic] Band" at the famed Cotton Club in Harlem, New York. -- A printed postcard featuring students in a lecture hall or assembly room at Wiley College in Marshall, Texas. Postally used and cancelled at Marshall, 1922. -- A group portrait of the members of "Ward #1, Mt. Zion Baptist Church 1932." -- A composite photograph featuring individual oval portraits of graduates of the 1936 class at the Birmingham Alabama Industrial High School. -- An outdoor group portrait of the attendees of a YMCA camp, "Camp Osceola," taken 13 August 1940. -- A real photo postcard featuring an outdoor group portrait of students at the "Jacksonville Colored School." -- A photograph of summer school students in a chemistry classroom, credited to "The Photographic Division, C. M. Battey, Instructor, Tuskegee Institute, Alabama" in blindstamp to lower left. Captioned on verso paper label. -- And many more. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 23 - [RELIGION]. LOVE, Emanuel King, Rev. (1850-1900).

[RELIGION]. LOVE, Emanuel King, Rev. (1850-1900). History of the First African Baptist Church, From Its Organization, January 20th, 1788, to July 1st, 1888… Savannah: The Morning News Print, 1888. [With:] 131st Anniversary broadside featuring pastors of the church. 8vo (155 x 205 mm). (Title page loose but present, pages 193-196 partially loose, spotting and soiling to pages and edges.) Publisher’s brown cloth gilt (significant wear, light separation and discoloration). FIRST EDITION. The First African Baptist Church grew from a small congregation founded in 1773 by George Leile, an enslaved man who had been licensed to preach by Georgia Baptists on plantations along the Savannah River. Among his earliest converts was Andrew Bryan, who was the only one of the church’s original converts to stay in Savannah following the Revolutionary War. The church was officially recognized in 1788 and in 1794 its first frame structure was built on land purchased by Bryan the year before. It would later be instrumental in helping escaped slaves make their way to freedom on the Underground Railroad. [With:] 11 x 15 in. printed broadside (chipping, loss, discoloration, spotting throughout), framed to 15 1/2 x 20 1/2 (not examined out of frame). Ca 1919. This 131st anniversary broadside presents halftone oval portraits of the first 8 "Pastors of the First African Baptist Church, Franklin Square, Savannah, Ga., U.S.A." The subjects are numbered and identified below, with a brief statement about the church's history: "The First African Baptist Church, Franklin Square, Savannah, Ga., was organized January 20, 1788 at Brampton's Barn, three miles from the city of Savannah and is the oldest Negro church in America, and has one of the largest memberships in the United States." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 24 - [RELIGION]. TOWNSEND, V.M. Some Reasons Why I Am an African Methodist. [Little Rock, AR?: Privately Printed for the Author, ca 1940].

[RELIGION]. TOWNSEND, V.M. Some Reasons Why I Am an African Methodist. [Little Rock, AR?: Privately Printed for the Author, ca 1940]. 24mo (4 x 6.5 in.), 20pp. Stapled printed wrappers (some toning, minimal spotting). Page 2 illustrated with a portrait of Rev. V.M. Townsend, D.D., LL. D., Presiding Elder Little Rock District, Arkansas Annual Conference, also identified as "'Uncle Vince,' Member Executive Board Shorter College, Arkansas' Senior Presiding Elder." In the introductory paragraph, Reverend Townsend writes of why he published "this little pamphlet," which was "the result of a few words to me by Mr. S.M. Ballard who said he was inspired to say to me, 'You are the Senior Presiding Elder of your church in the state, considered sane in your judgment, a safe leader for many years. Strong in your devotion to the A.M.E. Church, Why are you such a strong African Methodist?' I decided then to answer the question in this little pamphlet, and let every one who desires know just why I am an African Methodist." The pamphlet includes sections focusing on the scriptural foundation and origin of the A.M.E. Church, baptism, holiness, "Christ our Head," and "our women." Pages 19-20 contain a poem from Reverend Townsend with the heading, "The Following Poem Bespeaks my Sentiments." SCARCE: OCLC locates four institutional holdings. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 25 - [RELIGION]. A group of items related to African American Baptist churches.

[RELIGION]. A group of items related to African American Baptist churches. CUNNINGHAM, Rev. J. M., comp. Directory of Colored Churches and Schools of Jackson and Madison County July, 1951. Jackson, [TN]: Laycook, ca 1951. ANDERSON, George H., photog. 8 1/4 x 10 in. mounted silver gelatin composite photograph featuring group and individual portraits of members and leaders of the First Baptist Church of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, including Reverend J.R. Bowens, the choir, the board, and the entire congregation. Credited and dated in the negative: "by Geo. H. Anderson Nashville Tenn. / Oct. 22 1922." And 3 souvenir programs for sessions of Baptist groups including the "Diamond Jubilee of the General Association of Colored Baptists in Kentucky" in Louisville, KY (10-13 August 1943); "the 71st Annual Sitting of the National Baptist Convention U. S. A., Inc." in Oklahoma City, OK (4-9 September, 1951); and a celebration called "Victory Day" at Mt. Zion Baptist Church in Lockland, OH (3 October 1943). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 26 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. Marriage Certificate. Chicago: P.P. and F. Co., 1910.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. Marriage Certificate. Chicago: P.P. and F. Co., 1910. 15 3/4 x 20 in. chromolithograph (light edge and corner wear). Poster featuring an illustration at center of an African American couple taking their vows from an African American minister. The scene is surrounded by an elaborate chain and ribbon border, and a certification section is included below, intended to be filled in by the couple joined in holy matrimony. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 27 - [WOMEN]. A group of 3 booklets related to women's organizations including the National Association of Colored Women.

[WOMEN]. A group of 3 booklets related to women's organizations including the National Association of Colored Women. Minutes of the Woman's Mite Missionary Convention of the Third Episcopal District of the African Methodist Episcopal Church held July 3, 4, and 5, 1893 in the St. Paul A. M. E. Church, Columbus, Ohio. Steubenville, OH: Star Print, [1893]. 5 1/4 x 6 1/4 in. String-bound original wrappers (significant wear, separation, chipping, and soiling). Souvenir Program Eighteenth Biennial Session National Association of Colored Women Affiliated with the National Council of Women July 21 to 28, 1933. N.p., [1933]. 8 x 11 in. Staple-bound original wrappers (significant toning, moderate-heavy creasing, minor chipping and wear to extremities). PARKER, Mary A., comp. Ritual of the Past Most Noble Governors' (or True Daughters') Degree for the Past Most Noble Governors' Chamber Containing the Opening, Closing and Initiation Ceremonies. Washington, DC: Odd Fellows Journal, 1919. 5 x 7 5/8 in. Publisher's cloth (few small holes extending through clothes and pages, surface wear, some discoloration). All three volumes detail meeting programs, rituals, and minutes in that order. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 28 - [WOMEN - TERRELL, MARY CHURCH (1863-1954)]. National Association of Colored Women's Clubs, Inc. pinback button. featuring Dr. Mary Church Terrell.

[WOMEN - TERRELL, MARY CHURCH (1863-1954)]. National Association of Colored Women's Clubs, Inc. pinback button. featuring Dr. Mary Church Terrell. 2 1/2 in. diam. (65 mm) pinback (some discoloration, surface wear; oxidation to verso). A halftone portrait of Dr. Mary Church Terrell "Founding President / Educator - Emancipator" is featured at center, surrounded by black text on pink strip reading: "National Association of Colored Women's Clubs, Inc. / Organized 1896." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 29 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. A pair of 1936 publications related to the National Negro Congress.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. A pair of 1936 publications related to the National Negro Congress. The Official Proceedings of the National Negro Congress. Washington, DC: National Negro Congress, ca 1936. 8vo (136 x 196 mm). Staple-bound original illustrated wrappers (toning, creasing, light soiling). "The National Negro Congress convened in the city of Chicago, February 14, 15, and 16, 1936. It was attended by 817 delegates from 585 organizations, spread geographically over 28 states and the District of Columbia." The keynote address of President A. Philip Randolph is printed along with full and excerpted addresses from other important speakers, with reports and resolutions on a number of topics covered at the convention including "The Farm Population," "Lynching and Civil Liberties," "Aid to Ethiopia," "Improving Status of Foreign Born Negroes," and many others. Illinois Labor Notes. Vol. 4, No. 3. Chicago, IL: National Research League, March 1936. 18pp., 8vo (215 x 278 mm) (disbound, toning, staple residue and holes, chipping to page edges, possibly missing back wrapper). Printed hand-written block letters on front cover label this the "National Negro Congress Issue" of the publication, with contents listed including "Where the Negro People Make Their Homes," "Negroes in Chicago Industry," and "Jim Crow Evanston," and additional block letters reading, "Welcome, Delegates!" Formed at Howard University in 1936, the National Negro Congress was organized to "secure the right of the Negro people to be free from Jim Crowism, segregation, discrimination, lynching, and mob violence" and "to promote the spirit of unity and cooperation between Negro and white people." It was initiated as a national body combining church, labor, and civil rights organizations together, in order to coordinate efforts in protesting inequality and worsening economic conditions for Black people. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 30 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. Ledger recording "colored voters" registered at the Floyd County, VA Court House, 1920-1960.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. Ledger recording "colored voters" registered at the Floyd County, VA Court House, 1920-1960. Folio (15 1/4 x 10 1/4 in.) Partly printed applied paper label affixed to front cover, "Roll of Colored Voters Registered at Court House Precinct Court House Magisterial District Floyd County, Virginia Since January 1, 1904." (Some short tears, flaking on the edges, abrasions to binding, torn portion to each page.) Contains double-page printed forms for keeping records. Approx. 24 pages filled out, some pages listing multiple registered voters and others listing one or two. Voter registration roll demonstrates the range of occupations and statuses of enrollees, with occupations including Pullman Porters, stonemasons, powder plant workers, and more. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 31 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. Voting registration examination. [Etowah County, Alabama], n.d.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. Voting registration examination. [Etowah County, Alabama], n.d. Approx. 6 x 3 3/8 in. paper examination (creasing, soiling, some minor chipping to edges and corners). Printed "Examination in U. S. History" with 6 questions or prompts listed and instructions to "Omit one; five questions required." Questions/prompts include: "Name three noted explorer, giving their nationality;" "By whom and for what purpose were the following settlements made: (a) Virginia, (b) Georgia, (c) New York, (d) Pennsylvania, (e) Maryland;" "Explain the Monroe Doctrine;" and "How did the United States come into possession of the following: (a) Florida, (b) The Hawaiian Islands, (c) Porto [sic] Rico, (d) The Philippine Islands, (e) Alaska?" Once the 15th Amendment was ratified and African Americans won the right to vote, many states began introducing literacy tests as a safeguard to keep certain people from actually casting a ballot. These tests, along with other obstacles, disproportionately affected poor African Americans in the South with minimal literacy skills. These tests took many forms, but some relied on abstract interpretive questions that could be easily rejected for errors. Others required a thorough understanding of local law enforcement. Others still required an in-depth knowledge of U.S. History, like the example featured here. The NAACP voter registration program eventually created sample tests and applications to prepare and educate African Americans before they went to register to vote. These kinds of discriminatory practices continued until the enactment of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which prohibited racial discrimination in voting. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 32 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. Vote but Don't Vote in the Dark. N.p.: NAACP Voter Education Project, ca 1962-1963.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. Vote but Don't Vote in the Dark. N.p.: NAACP Voter Education Project, ca 1962-1963. 8 1/2 x 11 in. printed broadside issued by the NAACP Voter Education Project (soiling, possible dampstaining, tape repairs to marginal tears and areas of separation). Between 1962 and 1964, the Voter Education Project (VEP) sponsored 129 voter campaigns, spent over $85,000, and registered approx. 688,000 Black southerners - all before the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The VEP not only helped with registration, but it also collected data from across eleven southern states to document disenfranchisement. The VEP coordinated the voter registration campaigns of five civil rights groups, including the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the NAACP, the Congress of Racial Equality, and the National Urban League, under the auspices of the Southern Regional Council (SRC), a non-profit research organization. The creation of the VEP enabled foundations to make tax-free donations directly to voter registration efforts, which were then coordinated by SRC to prevent duplicate coverage areas. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 33 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. NAACP internal memorandum on Voter Registration Education Program. Richmond, Virginia: NAACP Voter Registration Committee, 1 March 1965.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. NAACP internal memorandum on Voter Registration Education Program. Richmond, Virginia: NAACP Voter Registration Committee, 1 March 1965. 18pp, 8 1/2 x 13 1/2 in. with corner staple (small dampstain at bottom running through entire document, scattered discoloration, some edgewear). Internal memorandum issued to Regional Chairman, Regional Secretary, State Conference Presidents, Executive Secretaries, Field Secretaries, and Voter Registration Committee Chairmen from John M. Brooks, Director, and Kelly M. Alexander, Chairman, of the Richmond, Virginia, NAACP Voter Registration Committee. Memo emphasizes the importance of municipal elections to local voters and as a launching point for the promotion of the NAACP Voter Registration Education Program, including the "Practical Politics Program" which will teach individuals "to be alert to the gimmicks the power structure uses to dilute Negro and liberal white votes in many areas of our country." Among the "gimmicks" identified are gerrymandering, poll tax laws, financing and pitting two Negro candidates for election against one another, and slow down tactics at the registrar's office. Additionally, the memo indicates the "Political Action Program will teach Negroes the full meaning of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the economic Opportunity (Anti-Poverty) Act." Subsequent pages list "Municipal Elections Being Held in 1965 in Cities Over 10,000 in Region II" as well as "State and County Elections 1965." [With:] Printed NAACP Membership Card identified to Mr. Marcelle Lewis of the Bronx, New York. 1962-63. Approx. 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. folded for mailing, 5 1/2 x 7 in. opened. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 34 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. A group of items related to the NAACP incl. membership card and certificate.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. A group of items related to the NAACP incl. membership card and certificate. 3 7/8 x 2 5/8 in. NAACP membership card (toning and wear to edges) for "Mr. Jesse C. Butler." Date stamped November 1939. Verso printed with the multi-faceted purpose of the NAACP, including "To educate America to accord full rights and opportunities to Negroes;" "To fight injustice in Courts when based on race prejudice;" "To stop lynching;" and more. 6 x 7 in. NAACP membership certificate (toning, creasing, some wear to edges and corners) for "Mr. J. E. Weaver" of Texarkana, Texas. Date stamped 2 March 1922, No. 3418. Verso lists the various classes of membership along with their respective costs. Typed letter unsigned. Addressed to Messers A & L Sablosky of Garrick Theatre, Norristown, PA. Norristown, PA, 13 August 1918. 2 1/4 pages, 8 3/8 x 10 7/8 in. (creased, with some small separations and losses, spotting). On Norristown Association for the Advancement of Colored People letterhead. Letter regards the upcoming showing of "The Birth of a Nation" at the Garrick Theatre on 19 August 1918. In part: "We sincerely regret that arrangements have been made for this exhibition and desire to inform you that if the film is shown, it will be over the severest protest which can be entered against it by the Colored People of this community and vicinity...This play, 'The Birth of a Nation,' is reprehensible to the best thinking white and colored People, in Every community where it has been exhibited. Several Pennsylvania communities have refused permission to exhibit the film, and wherever it has be [sic] shown the seed of RACE HATE and MOB VIOLENCE has been sown and has resulted in intensifying the spirit of RACE ANTIPATHY and caused a wider separation between the races...Should this exhibition provoke a clash between the races, you would be responsible." And 3 other items, including an invitation to the Chicago NAACP Fighting Fund for Freedom Dinner at the Conrad Hilton Hotel on 16 June 1967; a resolutions booklet for the NAACP 43rd Annual Conference held in Oklahoma City, OK from 24-29 June 1952; and 7/8 diam. blue and white NAACP "Member / 1968" pinback. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 35 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. Join the March for Freedom! Join the NAACP Now! Midwest Decalomania Co., : Chicago, IL, ca 1960s.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. Join the March for Freedom! Join the NAACP Now! Midwest Decalomania Co., : Chicago, IL, ca 1960s. 4 1/2 x 7 5/8 in. sticker (some toning wear to edges, unknown adhesive properties). Verso bears application instructions for various surfaces along with company name and location. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 36 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. A collection of pamphlets, forms, and other ephemera related to the NAACP.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. A collection of pamphlets, forms, and other ephemera related to the NAACP. Join NAACP for Civil Rights: 1953 Membership Campaign. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1953. 8 1/2 x 11 in. flyer with cut-away membership and donation form on verso (horizontal creases, toning). Untitled. No. 1. New York: Youth Division of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, ca 1950s. Cover art by Reynolds Ruffin, with articles covering topics from the Pan American Conference to American sports. NAACP Hand Book: Outline of Procedure for Legal Cases. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1944. 20pp., 4 1/4 x 6 3/4 in. Staple-bound original illustrated wrappers (minor spotting). Pamphlet includes tear-away membership and donation form. And 5 other items including an invitation to the 40th Anniversary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in New York, ca 1949; a form for electing delegates to the 1st Annual Southeastern Regional Leadership Training Conference in Birmingham, AL, 1953; a conference program for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People North Carolina State Conference 9th Annual Convention in High Point, NC, 1952; and 2 other items. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 37 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. Join hands for equality Now...Join CORE. New York, NY: ca 1963.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. Join hands for equality Now...Join CORE. New York, NY: ca 1963. 14 x 21 5/8 in. printed poster (approx. 1 1/4 in. diagonal tear to upper edge, minor wear and tear to edges and corners). Union label to lower left. The top half of the poster is made up of a half tone image of CORE worker Mimi Feingold linking arms with African American residents of West Feliciana Parish at a voter registration event in St. Francisville, Louisiana (taken by Bob Adelman but not credited). The bottom half consists of white and black text on an orange-red background reading: "Join hands for equality Now / in Employment / in Housing / in Schools / in Community / Join CORE." The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) was founded in 1942 by a group of interracial students in Chicago, and was instrumental in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. The group was characterized by its policy of nonviolent direct action early on, supporting and/or organizing boycotts, sit-ins, and integrated bus rides that became known as Freedom Rides. Mimi Feingold got involved in the organization, participating in Freedom Rides and helping register Black voters in the South in the early 1960s. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 38 - [KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story. How 50,000 Negroes Found a New Way to End Racial Discrimination. Nyack, NY: Fellowship of Reconciliation, [ca 1957].

[KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story. How 50,000 Negroes Found a New Way to End Racial Discrimination. Nyack, NY: Fellowship of Reconciliation, [ca 1957]. 8vo, (6 3/4 x 10 1/4 in.). 16pp. Original color pictorial wrappers (lightly toned throughout). Comic book format, illustrated pamphlet in full color. CGC Universal Grade 5.5 (encapsulated in plastic, unexamined outside holder). FIRST EDITION and only printing of this comic book illustrating Martin Luther King, Jr.'s involvement in the Montgomery Bus Boycott, printed in a run of 250,000 copies and widely distributed amongst civil rights groups, churches, and schools. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 39 - [KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. Rally for Freedom in Support of the Birmingham Movement. Wrigley Field, Los Angeles, CA: 26 May 1963.

[KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. Rally for Freedom in Support of the Birmingham Movement. Wrigley Field, Los Angeles, CA: 26 May 1963. 4pp, folio, 7 x 8 1/2 in. (light toning, slight loss to lower right corner of cover). Program cover identifies featured presenters as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Dick Gregory, Rev. Wyatt Walker, and Rev. Ralph Abernathy. Interior lists "Participating Organizations," as well as individual names under "Publicity," "Community Contact," "Ushers," and "Citizens Committee." Martin Luther King, Jr. was arrested in Birmingham, Alabama, on 12 April 1963, and penned his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" while spending more than a week in confinement there. The Rally for Freedom, held in Los Angeles just over a month later, was a fundraising event for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. It was specifically organized to aid the SCLC in meeting the cost of bail and appeal bonds. Harnessing the star-power and financial wherewithal of Hollywood elites such as Sammy Davis, Jr., Dorothy Dandridge, Paul Newman, Rita Moreno, and Marlon Brando, the event helped raise awareness for the Civil Rights movement and an estimated quarter of a million dollars. Approximately 30,000 people were in attendance at the event. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 40 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. An Appeal to you...to March on Washington. New York, 1963.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. An Appeal to you...to March on Washington. New York, 1963. 5 1/2 x 8 1/4 in. printed handbill (light wear including folds, some creasing, short tear to right edge). With inked stamp of "Bay Area Headquarters...San Francisco." Although printed in New York, the event had national reach as evidenced by the San Francisco stamp. A call to join the March on Washington with an appeal from ten march organizers including Martin Luther King, Jr., John Lewis, A. Philip Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. The handbill lists the demands of the marchers, directing them to "get information on how to go to Washington by calling civil rights organizations, religious organizations, trade unions, fraternal organizations and youth groups." Although printed in New York, this handbill was distributed in San Francisco, exemplifying the nationwide reach of the gathering. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 41 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Organizing Manual No. 2. New York: National Office, March on Washington, 1963.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Organizing Manual No. 2. New York: National Office, March on Washington, 1963. 12pp, 4 3/4 x 8 1/4 in., paper wrappers, stapled at spine (very fine condition, minimal wear). Issued by Cleveland Robinson, Chairman, and Bayard Rustin, Deputy Director, this manual was the second and last set of instructions issued to march organizers. Contents include identification of those sponsoring the march, including Dr. King, demands being made by the marchers, immediate tasks at hand prior to the march (organizing transport, gathering unemployed, raise funds), transport to and from Washington, schedules, signs and banners, captains and marshals, etc. A rare organizing manual from the largest gathering for civil rights of its time, and one of the most important rallies in United States history. [With:] "Why We March." 8 1/2 x 9 in. newspaper clipping from unidentified publication featuring a quote from Manual No. 2 March on Washington Committee. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 42 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963: Lincoln Memorial Program. [Washington, DC], 1963.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963: Lincoln Memorial Program. [Washington, DC], 1963. 4pp, 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. program (light creasing). A program issued to participants, the front page features the schedule of events including the National Anthem led by Marian Anderson, a Tribute to Negro Women Fighters for Freedom by Mrs. Medgar Evers, remarks by John Lewis, Whitney M. Young, Jr., and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The program's interior includes a "Statement by the heads of the ten organizations calling for discipline in connection with the Washington March" and a list of 10 demands. The last page features a map with a route of the march. RARE, only four other copies have ever sold at auction, OCLC locates 4 copies. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 43 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. March for Freedom Now...Assemble Opposite the White House. [Washington, DC], 14 June 1963. Handbill for march scheduled three days after John F. Kennedy's televised civil rights address.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. March for Freedom Now...Assemble Opposite the White House. [Washington, DC], 14 June 1963. Handbill for march scheduled three days after John F. Kennedy's televised civil rights address. 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. printed handbill (toning, very good condition overall). Organizations listed at the foot of sheet include: Washington - Congress of Racial Equality, Washington - National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, and Southern Christian Leadership Conference. RARE: OCLC locates one copy. Organized jointly by the Congress of Racial Equality, the NAACP, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, this June 1963 march was scheduled just three days after John F. Kennedy's televised civil rights address announcing that he would begin the push for civil rights legislation. The handbill features six bullet points, including a call for "no federal funds for apartheid states," a demand for "fair job rights for all," and a call to "end blatant job discrimination in the Justice Department." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 44 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. "March and Vote for Jobs and Freedom / Cincinnati, Ohio" pinback button. 1963.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. "March and Vote for Jobs and Freedom / Cincinnati, Ohio" pinback button. 1963. 1 1/2 in. diam. (37 mm) pinback (some surface wear, toning). An illustration of a polling place, with people standing in line outside of a booth in which a man casts his vote, is featured at center. Text above reads, "March and Vote for Jobs and Freedom," while text below reads, "Cincinnati, Ohio / October 27, 1963." Inspired by the famous March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, held in August, many cities around the country held similar demonstrations of their own, like the one referenced in the button featured here. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 45 - [KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. Martin Luther King...at Communist Training School. Promotional flyer issued by the Georgia Commission on Education, ca 1963-1964.

[KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. Martin Luther King...at Communist Training School. Promotional flyer issued by the Georgia Commission on Education, ca 1963-1964. 8 1/2 x 14 in. printed flyer (minimal toning to margins, small spot at lower right, light edge wear). With "Reprint from Georgia Commission of Education" printed lower right. A variant of the flyer produced by the Alert Americans Association. The right-wing flyer features an image from the 8 July 1963 issue of the Augusta Courier, showing Martin Luther King seated with a group of people at the Highlander Folk School in Monteagle, TN. Dr. King and three of the men seated beside him are identified in the flyer as having ties to the Communist Party. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 46 - [KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. A group of pamphlets, flyers, and other ephemera related to the SCLC and King.

[KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. A group of pamphlets, flyers, and other ephemera related to the SCLC and King. We Still Have A Dream. Baltimore, MD: Allied Printing, 1983. 15pp., 8 3/8 x 10 7/8 in. Original illustrated wrappers (toning, minor creasing). Official program for the March on Washington held on the 20th anniversary of the historic 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Program outlines the 3 key themes of the march, being jobs, peace, and freedom. Facsimile letters to marchers from Washington, DC Mayor Marion Barry, Jr. and Walter E. Fauntroy are also included, along with portraits and biographies of "co-chairs," an event program, and a tear-off section with which to order souvenirs. Support Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign: Walk for justice...National Day of Support / Poor People's Campaign / Washington, D.C., May 30, 1968. N.p., [1968]. 8 1/2 x 11 in. printed flyer (some creasing, chips, tears, and loss to edges and corners, spots of discoloration). Features a halftone image of King to upper right, with copied handwritten instructions to call a number "If you are going," and instructions for how to send money to "Help a Brother or Sister" participate in the walk to lower right. "SCLC Project Report" pamphlet. Ca 1967. 8vo, 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. (creasing, toning). outlining the progress on various projects the SCLC is engaged in, including "Operation Breadbasket," "Citizenship Education Program," and "Urban Renewal." SCLC Scope Project pinback, 7/8 diam. (minor surface wear). WHITE, Eugene E., artist. Lithograph poster of Martin Luther King, Jr. Ca 1968. 13 x 16 3/4 in. (sight) framed to 17 1/4 x 22 1/4 in. Advertising calendar for Universal Life Insurance Co. featuring Martin Luther King, Jr., John F. Kennedy, and Robert F. Kennedy one one side and 4 Black company executives on the other side. N.p., 1972. 7 5/8 x 11 in. (some creasing, spotting, and chipping to edges, with hole at top edge for mounting). And 4 other items including a flyer asking, "Did He Live in Vain?" about Martin Luther King, Jr. and issued by the League of Women Voters of Berkeley; a printed postcard featuring a halftone image of King at "Communist Training School;" and a 1968 issue of Detroit Schools featuring a portrait of King and article titled "Board Pays Tribute to Martin Luther King" on front page. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 47 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. Archive associated with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, incl. documents and publication, 1957-1967.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. Archive associated with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, incl. documents and publication, 1957-1967. A group of 8 items, comprising: News release. 8 August 1957. Montgomery, Alabama. Statement concerning the Civil Rights Bill as passed unanimously in a session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and other positions adopted by the conference. 3pp

Lot: 48 - [KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. SLEET, Moneta, Jr. (1926-1996), photographer. Dr. King asleep on plane en route to Oslo, Norway to Receive Nobel Peace Prize, 1964. Printed later.

[KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. SLEET, Moneta, Jr. (1926-1996), photographer. Dr. King asleep on plane en route to Oslo, Norway to Receive Nobel Peace Prize, 1964. Printed later. 8 1/8 x 10 in. (including margins) silver gelatin photograph (few creases to margins, light surface wear). Features Dr. King sleeping with his hands clasped together near his face and curtains pulled together over the windows behind his head. Verso bears affixed paper label with typewritten caption and ink inscription reading, "credit photographer Moneta Sleet, Jr." Born in Owensboro, KY, Moneta Sleet, Jr. studied journalism and photography extensively before serving his county in World War II. After returning to the US, he began a long career at Ebony Magazine in 1955. It was in that capacity that he followed Martin Luther King, Jr. for 13 years, witnessing (and more importantly, capturing) the Civil Rights Movement up close. One of his most famous images was a photograph of King with Rosa Parks, Ralph Abernathy, Ralph Bunche, and Coretta Scott King, leading a group of marchers. Sleet became the first African American to win the Pulitzer Prize for photography in 1969 for his photograph, Deep Sorrow, which captured Coretta Scott King at her husband's funeral. This is a circa 1970-1975 restrike of the original image. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 49 - [KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. LOUW, Joseph (1939-2003), photographer. Wire photograph capturing the immediate aftermath of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. [With:] Should Rioters be Rewarded pamphlet.

[KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. LOUW, Joseph (1939-2003), photographer. Wire photograph capturing the immediate aftermath of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. [With:] Should Rioters be Rewarded pamphlet. 8 x 6 3/8 in. wire photograph (small crease to upper right corner and minor surface imperfections). New York: Time Inc., 1978. Caption printed in margin reads, "(NY6-Dec. 31)--KING ASSASSINATION--Aides of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. point in the direction from which they believe his assailant fired as he lies dying on a Memphis, Tenn., motel balcony in 1968. On Saturday the House Assassinations Committee released its conclusion that the killings of President John F. Kennedy and Rev. King might have been the results of conspiracies..." Verso bears modern inscriptions, barcode label, and ink stamp. This thermal duplication of the original photograph taken by Joseph Louw for Time Magazine, was published following the release of the findings of the House Select Committee on Assassinations in 1978. [With:] Should Rioters be Rewarded? : An exposé of the plans to push bills through Congress to use your income tax dollars to bribe rioters to stop rioting. [New Orleans, LA]: The Independent American, 1968. 3 3/8 x 8 1/2 in. brochure (significant brown spot to front panel, few other spots, toning to some edges). Part of the "Tax Fax" series (No. 90), this pamphlet was published 11 days after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in the midst of what became known as the Holy Week Uprising. This was the term given to the collective wave of riots that erupted in the wake of King's death, some of the largest of which took place in Washington, DC, Baltimore, Chicago, and Kansas City. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 50 - [KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. Obsequies Martin Luther King Jr. [Atlanta]: n.p., 1968. [With:] Funeral card.

[KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. Obsequies Martin Luther King Jr. [Atlanta]: n.p., 1968. [With:] Funeral card. Obsequies Martin Luther King Jr. [Atlanta]: n.p., 1968. 8vo (5 1/2 x 8 3/4 in.). Half-titles. Original wrappers with halftone portrait King in prayer (light toning, light edge wear). Inside cover inscribed to Barbara Jean Danner from Lillie Armstrong Thomas, "One who knew Dr. King well, and admired him greatly!" dated 9 July 1998. Stanford University's Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute references a Lillie Thomas Armstrong Hunter who was an employee and close friend to Dr. King. She first worked as a church secretary at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church while Dr. King served as pastor and later worked as the bookkeeper for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. FIRST PRINTING of the program for Martin Luther King Jr.'s funeral held at Ebenezer Baptist Church and Morehouse College in Atlanta. The program was later reprinted on different paper bearing a copyright statement to Coretta Scott King. RARE, OCLC locates 9 copies with few ever sold at auction. Burns, Burial for a King, p.148. [With:] Martin Luther King Jr. funeral card. Philadelphia: Diversified Graphics, 1968. 5 3/4 x 4 1/2 in. printed card (minimal wear, including light residue near top edge of card, otherwise very fine). The funeral card was issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Atlanta, GA, shortly after the assassination of Dr. King in 1968 and features a portrait of Dr. King next to a quote from 10 December 1964. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 51 - [KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)] -- [RAY, James Earl (1928-1998)]. Wanted by the FBI / Civil Rights - Conspiracy - Interstate Flight - Robbery. Washington, DC: Federal Bureau of Investigation, 19 April 1968.

[KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)] -- [RAY, James Earl (1928-1998)]. Wanted by the FBI / Civil Rights - Conspiracy - Interstate Flight - Robbery. Washington, DC: Federal Bureau of Investigation, 19 April 1968. 10 1/2 x 16 in. printed poster (creasing, losses and tears to crease intersections and edges, adhesive residue to verso upper edge). This poster, mailed to the Postmaster in Matherville, IL, includes photographs taken of James Early Ray in 1960 and 1968, and warns that "Ray is sought in connection with a murder wherein the victim was shot. Consider armed and extremely dangerous." [With:] 10 3/4 x 8 1/2 in. press print of an graphic illustration titled, "From Escape to Capture-- The Twisted Trail of James Earl Ray" (creasing, wear, soiling to edges and corners). AP News: 30 December 1968. This graphic features a map of the United States having encircled numbers 1-30 placed within and without, marking the various locations of James Earl Ray between 23 April 1967 and 20 July 1968. Below, the locations and dates are identified in print. James Earl Ray killed Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on 4 April 1968, fleeing the scene and escaping to Toronto within the month, and fleeing to London in June. He was apprehended at Heathrow airport and brought back to the United States to face charges. He pleaded guilty to the murder of Dr. King and was sentenced to 99 years in prison. He escaped from Brushy Mountain State Penitentiary in Petros, Tennessee on 10 June 1977, but was recovered within three days. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 52 - [KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. 2 posters featuring Martin Luther King, Jr., incl. I am on the Mountain Top by Zap.

[KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. 2 posters featuring Martin Luther King, Jr., incl. I am on the Mountain Top by Zap. Zap, artist. I am on the Mountain Top. Albuquerque, NM: Artko Studios, 1971. 21 3/4 x 33 1/2 in. blacklight poster (some creasing throughout, including creases and wear to edges). A large portrait of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is featured at center, above the quote, "I am on the Mountain Top," a reference to the last speech delivered by Dr. King on 3 April 1968, one day before his assassination. Somebody Paid the Price for Your Right. Register/Vote. The Millenium Group, Inc., 1976. 16 x 18 1/2 in. poster (scattered spotting, edge and corner wear incl. pinholes, creasing, some chipping). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 53 - [KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. Living the Dream. [San Francisco], 1986.

[KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. Living the Dream. [San Francisco], 1986. 8 1/2 x 11 in. printed flyer on sky-blue paper (dampstaining to right edge). Featured to the upper left is a blue ink halftone portrait of Martin Luther King Jr. alongside cursive font reading, "Living the Dream." Text below invites readers to join in observance of the first federal holiday in honor of King, including at a "Mass March" at Spear and Market Streets beginning at 11 a.m. and a "Mass Celebration" at Civic Center Plaza beginning at 1 p.m. Verso features a list of assembly areas for various groups involved in the march, including "Seniors & Disabled," "Labor organizations," "Peace & International Solidarity groups," and others, along with a map. [With:] A Guide to Celebrating Martin Luther King Jr. Day. New York: New York City Board of Education, Office of the Deputy Chancellor for Instruction and Development, Office of Program and Curriculum Development, 1988. 88pp., 8 1/2 x 11 in. Staple-bound original illustrated wrappers (minor wear to page edges, toning to wrappers). A guide for celebrating the holiday for elementary and secondary grades 4-12 including worksheets and lesson plans. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 54 - KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968), and KING, Martin Luther, III (b. 1957). A group of 2 signatures.

KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968), and KING, Martin Luther, III (b. 1957). A group of 2 signatures. KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968). N.p., n.d. 4 3/4 x 2 3/4 in. clipped signature ("Best Wishes, Martin Luther King Jr.") (very good). Matted to 8 1/4 x 11 1/2 in. with a printed portrait of Dr. King. [With:] KING, Martin Luther, III (b. 1957). Elder son of Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King, served as 4th President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (1997-2004). Signature on 5 x 3 in. index card (very good). Authenticated by PSA/DNA and encapsulated, overall size 7 1/4 x 4 1/4 in. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 55 - [KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. A group of 11 pinback buttons related to Martin Luther King, Jr., SCLC, and CORE.

[KING, Martin Luther, Jr. (1929-1968)]. A group of 11 pinback buttons related to Martin Luther King, Jr., SCLC, and CORE. 11 pinback buttons, approx. 3 3/8 in. diameter and smaller, including: 6 illustrating or commemorating Martin Luther King, Jr., the largest being a button for "PCLC - SCLC Jobs-Income, Poor People's Campaign 1968, Washington DC," with portraits of Dr. King and Ralph Abernathy above "I Have a Dream." -- 2 buttons related to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). -- 3 buttons related to the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), including an example promoting the "Freedom Ride." Together, 11 pinback buttons. Condition generally good, with toning, occasional soiling, wear consistent with age and use. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 56 - [AUTOGRAPHS]. Autographs of pioneering 20th-century African American figures, including ANDERSON, POWELL, CHISHOLM, KING, and more.

[AUTOGRAPHS]. Autographs of pioneering 20th-century African American figures, including ANDERSON, POWELL, CHISHOLM, KING, and more. A group of 12 autographs, comprising: American singer, ANDERSON, Marian, 3 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. black and white photograph signed, accompanied by mailing envelope indicating Anderson's "Mariana Farm" return address and a Danbury, Conn. cancellation, 24 March, 1964; first African American woman in Congress, CHISHOLM, Shirley, 5 x 2 1/4 in. card signed with "always aim high!" below signature; Civil Rights activist, KING, Coretta Scott, 5 x 3 card signed; First African American woman to serve as an ambassador, HARRIS, Patricia Roberts, 8 x 10 in. photograph signed; African American Navy musician and close friend of FDR, JACKSON, Graham, check signed; actor, DAVIS, Ossie, 8 x 10 in. photograph signed; first African American in space, BLUFORD, Guion, two covers signed; Secretary of State and Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff, POWELL, Colin, 8 x 10 in. photograph signed; World War II Medal of Honor recipient, BAKER, Vernon, note signed; African American educator and anthropologist, STARR, Frederick, letter signed; and African American actress, MCQUEEN, Butterfly, 8 x 10 in. photograph signed. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 57 - [AUTOGRAPHS]. A group of XX autographs from prominent 20th-century Civil Rights activists including PARKS, JACKSON, MEREDITH, LEWIS, and ABERNATHY.

[AUTOGRAPHS]. A group of XX autographs from prominent 20th-century Civil Rights activists including PARKS, JACKSON, MEREDITH, LEWIS, and ABERNATHY. PARKS, Rosa (1913-2005). Note card signed ("Rosa Parks"). 5 x 3 in. -- MEREDITH, James (b.1933 ). Harriet Tubman First Day of Issue cover signed ("James Meredith"), 6 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. -- BOND, Julian (1940-2015). LEWIS, John (1940-2020). HOOKS, Benjamin (1925-2010). GREGORY, Dick (1932-2017). Modern 8 x 10 in. photograph of a 5 x 3 "Drafting the Emancipation Proclamation" woodcut signed ("Julian Bond" "John Lewis" "B Hooks" "Dick Gregory). -- SEALE, Bobby (b.1936 ). Check endorsement signed ("Bobby Seale"). -- ABERNATHY, Ralph (1926-1990). 8 x 10 in. photograph signed ("Ralph David Abernathy"). -- SMITH, Lillian (1897-1966). Typed letter signed ("Lil"). 8 1/2 x 11 in. -- CHAVEZ, Cesar (1927-1993). Photograph signed ("Cesar Chazez"). -- HOOKS, Benjamin (1925-2010). Note card signed "B.L. Hooks"). -- INNIS, Roy (1934-2017). 8 x 10 in. photograph signed ("Roy Innis"). -- JACKSON, Jesse L. (b. 1941 ). 8 x 10 in. photograph signed ("Jesse L. Jackson"). [With:] Two Jesse Jackson campaign buttons: "Keep Hope Alive" and "Jackson Delegate / Atlanta '88." This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 58 - [MALCOLM X (1925-1965)]. A group of items related to Malcolm X and the Organization of Afro-American Unity (OAAU), comprising:

[MALCOLM X (1925-1965)]. A group of items related to Malcolm X and the Organization of Afro-American Unity (OAAU), comprising: 2 typewritten drafts of a flyer for "Malcolm X Day," held on 19 May 1968. 8 1/2 x 11 in. (toning, dampstaining, creasing chipping to edges and corners). Text on both drafts identical, though one includes a pencil inscription, "Moon" in the left margin, likely indicating

Lot: 59 - [MALCOLM X (1925-1965)]. "To educate the man is to educate an individual. To educate the woman is to educate and liberate a nation." N.p., n.d. [ca 1960-1970s].

[MALCOLM X (1925-1965)]. "To educate the man is to educate an individual. To educate the woman is to educate and liberate a nation." N.p., n.d. [ca 1960-1970s]. 23 1/2 x 17 3/4 in. poster (large vertical creases on right and left sides and at center, corner and edge wear, scattered marks, light soil, verso with adhesive residue at corners). Designer uncredited. A scarce propaganda poster featuring a photograph of Malcolm X and quote attributed to him on the importance of educating women. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 60 - [CIVIL RIGHTS - MILITARIA]. A group of 3 posters involving Malcolm X and Fred Hampton, including: "You and I have not benefited from American Democracy, We've only suffered from American Hypocrisy." Ca 1970s.

[CIVIL RIGHTS - MILITARIA]. A group of 3 posters involving Malcolm X and Fred Hampton, including: "You and I have not benefited from American Democracy, We've only suffered from American Hypocrisy." Ca 1970s. "You and I have not benefited from American Democracy, We've only suffered from American Hypocrisy." Ca 1970s. 17 1/2 x 22 1/2 in. silk-screen poster (light toning to margins, some creasing, including a series of creases to top right corner). An anti-war poster believed to have been produced during the Vietnam era, featuring a young Black soldier in fatigues, with a quote from Malcolm X at bottom. [With:] Stop Genocide. Support the Hampton/Clark Trial. December 4th Committee. Chicago, IL: Salsedo Press, n.d., ca early 1970s. 24 1/2 x 20 in. poster (heavy wear, creasing throughout, edge tears incl. 5 in. tear extending from bottom edge, loss to top left corner, few punctures/tears near center, few staple holes). Featuring portraits of slain Civil Rights activists, including George Jackson, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Mark Clark, and Fred Hampton, with one of Hampton's quotes. Fred Hampton (1948-1969) was a prominent young Civil Rights activist in the 1960s. Joining the Black Panther Party in 1968, Hampton quickly found success in leadership roles there as well, forming a "rainbow coalition" of diverse groups, and even publicly brokering a nonviolence pact between two of the most violent street gangs in Chicago. Hampton took charge of the BPP's Chicago Chapter, organizing rallies, teaching political education classes, and promoting community surveillance of the police. Hampton's efforts eventually led to him becoming the BPP chairman of the entire state of Illinois, thrusting him to leadership at the national level. Hampton met his untimely death when, in an early morning police raid of the Black Panther Party headquarters on 4 December 1969, he and fellow BPP activist Mark Clark were shot and killed by police officers. Over five thousand people attended his funeral, and many in the activist community saw Hampton's death as unjust, and a group of nine plaintiffs won 1.85 million dollars in a civil lawsuit, which was paid out by the City of Chicago, Cook County, and the federal government. December 4th was commemorated as Fred Hampton Day by the Chicago City Council in 2004, as a way to remember and honor the fallen activist. [Also with:] "We declare our right on this earth...to be a human being, to be respected as a human being, to be given the rights of a human being in this society, on this earth, in this day, which we intend to bring into existence by any means necessary." - Malcolm X. Indianapolis, IN: The Family of Malcolm X by CMG Worldwide Inc., 1999. Published by Pyramid, Leicester, UK. 24 x 33 3/4 in. poster (some creasing, edge and corner wear, pinholes at each corner). Together, 3 posters. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 61 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. A pair of posters related to Civil Rights activism in the 1960s. Ca 1964-67.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. A pair of posters related to Civil Rights activism in the 1960s. Ca 1964-67. COBB, Ron (1937-2020), artist. Remember...Uncle Tom Says- "Only You Can Prevent Ghetto Fires." Sawyer Press: Los Angeles, CA, 1967. 22 3/8 x 33 1/8 in. poster (toning). Ron Cobb worked as a cartoonist for the radical Los Angeles Free Press in 1965, producing editorial cartoons commenting on social and political issues in the 1960s and 70s. This example references a sentiment among young Black activists at the time that the elderly in their communities, who disapproved of violent demonstrations, were "Uncle Toms." -- [SUZUKI, Lewis, (1920-2016), artist]. We Shall Overcome / We Shall Live in Peace / Freedom Now. 18 1/8 x 28 3/8 in. poster mounted to 19 1/8 x 30 in. on linen-backed cardstock (dampstaining to lower corners, toning, wear with some repair to edges and corners). Signed and dated "Suzuki 64" lower right. Lewis Suzuki was a watercolor and printmaking artist, who served in World War II and dedicated his postwar life to promoting peace and liberation movements throughout the world. -- Together, 2 posters. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 62 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. NEWMAN, Earl, artist. SNCC: Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. N.p., ca 1965.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. NEWMAN, Earl, artist. SNCC: Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. N.p., ca 1965. 22 1/2 x 35 in. silk screen poster in red and black (toning, soiling, edge and corner wear, incl. some loss to each corner, few tape repairs and adhesive residue on recto and verso, some edge tears, small puncture/hole to right of first "C" in "SNCC"). A tender depiction of a man holding a child. One of two posters designed by California-based printer, Earl Newman (b. 1931), to help raise money for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Lot: 63 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. NEWMAN, Earl, artist. SNCC: Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. N.p., ca 1965.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. NEWMAN, Earl, artist. SNCC: Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. N.p., ca 1965. 22 1/2 x 35 in. silk screen poster in gray and black (toning, soiling, edge and corner wear, incl. some creasing, few edge tears, hole in each corner). A woman is shown cradling a child. One of two posters designed by California-based printer, Earl Newman (b. 1931), to help raise money for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Lot: 64 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. I Am A Man. San Francisco: Emerson Graphics, 1968.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. I Am A Man. San Francisco: Emerson Graphics, 1968. 22 1/8 x 27 7/8 in. printed poster mounted to 23 1/8 x 29 7/8 in. linen-backed cardstock (adhesive discoloration/bleed through, light wear to edges, else good.) Colossal red bock letters spell out "I Am A Man" with much smaller text centered below reading "Memphis." Lithographer credited to lower left: "tea lautrec litho - san francisco." Copyright information and mail order price to lower right. The legendary "I Am A Man" poster became a powerful and prominent symbol of the Civil Rights Movement after its use, originally during the Memphis sanitation workers' strike, which continued from February to April of 1968. More than a thousand black sanitation workers in Memphis walked off the job after two of their own were crushed by a garbage truck compactor and the public works department refused compensation to their families. The cause drew the attention and support of Martin Luther King, Jr., who traveled to Memphis to join the strikers as part of his Poor People's Campaign. He gave a speech on 18 March and led a demonstration that grew violent 10 days later. After martial law was imposed, the striking workers continued their march, carrying signs that read "I Am A Man." Of the slogan, one sanitation worker explained: “We felt we would have to let the city know that because we were sanitation workers, we were human beings. The signs we were carrying said ‘I Am a Man,’ and we were going to demand to have the same dignity and the same courtesy any other citizen of Memphis has.” (BROWN, DeNeen L., "‘I Am a Man’: The ugly Memphis sanitation workers’ strike that led to MLK’s assassination." The Washington Post. 12 February 2018.) These and similar signs were also used in later in the summer of 1968 during the Poor People's Campaign demonstrations in Washington, DC. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 65 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. H. Rap Brown. Amerikkka says to Black people: "You either fight to die, or you live to die!" N.p.: N.p., ca 1970.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. H. Rap Brown. Amerikkka says to Black people: "You either fight to die, or you live to die!" N.p.: N.p., ca 1970. 18 x 23 3/4 in. poster printed on red paper (creases including significant crease near lower edge, small chips or tears at edges). H. Rap Brown (b. 1943) was the fifth chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in 1966 and during a brief 6-month alliance with the Black Panther Party, served as their minister of justice. As a high-profile protester, he often advocated for violence against the government, which caused him to be targeted by the COINTELPRO program. In early 1970, he fled for 18 months and appeared on the FBI's "Ten Most Wanted List." While imprisoned (1971-76), he converted to Islam and changed his name to Jamil Abdullah al-Amin.

Lot: 66 - [BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. End the War / Free Bobby & all political prisoners. [Berkeley: People's Legal Defense Committee, ca 1968].

[BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. End the War / Free Bobby & all political prisoners. [Berkeley: People's Legal Defense Committee, ca 1968]. 18 1/4 x 24 3/4 in. silkscreen poster (very fine condition, minimal toning to margins). Possibly produced for a 1968 exhibition at the Phoenix Gallery in Berkeley. Anonymously-produced poster featuring a portrait of Bobby Seale, who had been arrested as one of the original "Chicago Eight" charged with conspiracy and inciting a riot in the 1968 Democratic National Convention. He was never convicted but sentenced to four years for 16 counts of contempt. During this prison sentence he was further prosecuted in the New Haven Black Panther trials. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 67 - [BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. Cleaver for President of the United States of America. [San Francisco, CA]: Jamerson Printing Company, ca 1968.

[BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. Cleaver for President of the United States of America. [San Francisco, CA]: Jamerson Printing Company, ca 1968. 17 x 21 7/8 in. printed poster (some minor creasing and wear to edges/corners, else good.) A half-tone portrait of Cleaver fills up the lower left quadrant of the poster, with surrounding text in varying styles reading, "Cleaver for President of the United States of America / ...power to the People...black power to Black People! / Black Panther Party, Peace & Freedom Party." Though technically not able to run as he was not yet 35, Eldridge Cleaver was elected the presidential nominee for the Peace and Freedom Party in 1968. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 68 - [BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. An Attack Against One Is An Attack Against All. San Francisco, CA: Robert Brown Elliott League, ca 1968-1970.

[BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. An Attack Against One Is An Attack Against All. San Francisco, CA: Robert Brown Elliott League, ca 1968-1970. 17 1/2 x 22 1/2 in. printed poster (holes and loss from hanging to corners, some additional punctures and creases throughout; some adhesive residue to verso along edges) A pouncing black panther is featured between bold text above and below, declaring: "An Attack Against One Is An Attack Against All / The Slaughter of Black People Must Be Stopped! By Any Means Necessary!" While little is known about the Robert Brown Elliott League, their eponymous figure was a Reconstruction-era congressman who first served as the first African American commanding general of the South Carolina National Guard. RARE: OCLC locates only 2 copies. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 69 - [BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. DOUGLAS, Emory (b. 1943), artist. One of Our Main Purposes is to Unify Our Brothers and Sisters in the North with Our Brothers and Sisters in the South. San Francisco, CA: [Black Panther Party], ca 1969.

[BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. DOUGLAS, Emory (b. 1943), artist. One of Our Main Purposes is to Unify Our Brothers and Sisters in the North with Our Brothers and Sisters in the South. San Francisco, CA: [Black Panther Party], ca 1969. 15 x 22 5/8 in. poster (creasing throughout, fold lines, few short tears and pinholes in poster, wear to margins). With credit to Douglas in lower left margin, "Minister of Culture, Emory." A man is shown at center, standing together with other revolutionaries brandishing weapons. The featured subject wears a button that appears to depict Ericka Huggins, activist and Black Panther Party member. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 70 - [BLACK PANTHERS -- NEWTON, Huey P. (1942-1989)]. The Genius of Huey P. Newton. [San Francisco, CA]: [Black Panther Party], ca 1970.

[BLACK PANTHERS -- NEWTON, Huey P. (1942-1989)]. The Genius of Huey P. Newton. [San Francisco, CA]: [Black Panther Party], ca 1970. 8vo. Illustrations. Original illustrated wrappers (minor wear at corners, discoloration spot to upper left front wrapper). Compilation of the writings of Huey P. Newton with an introduction by Eldridge Cleaver who notes: "Huey P. Newton's thoughts, like his action is clear and precise, cutting always to the very heart of the matter." He concludes: "And finally let no one think that the Black Panther Party has relinquished its demand that Huey be set free." Includes a portrait of Newton by Emory Douglas as well as several photographic portraits. [With:] Huey Newton Talks to the Movement about the Black Panther Party, Cultural Nationalistm, SNCC, Liberals and White Revolutionaries. [Chicago?]: Students for a Democratic Society, 1968. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 71 - [BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. The Racist Dog Policemen Must Withdraw Immediately from our Communities... Emeryville, CA: ca 1971.

[BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. The Racist Dog Policemen Must Withdraw Immediately from our Communities... Emeryville, CA: ca 1971. 23 1/8 x 28 3/16 in. printed poster mounted to 23 5/8 x 30 3/4 in. linen-backed cardstock (some punctures and discolorations throughout). Graphic Arts of Marin Inc. imprint to lower right corner. Poster features halftone image of Bobby Seale and Huey Newton standing on guard in front of the Black Panther Party headquarters in Oakland, California. Both are armed and wearing leather jackets and berets. Below the image bold text reads, "'The racist dog policemen must withdraw immediately from our communities, cease their wanton murder and brutality and torture of black people, or face the wrath of the armed people.' / Huey P. Newton, Minister of Defense." The Black Panther Party mailing address is listed below, opposite the iconic illustrated black panther symbol. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 72 - [BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. Black is Beautiful poster. [With:] Photographic essays, incl. The Vanguard and Drums of Life.

[BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. Black is Beautiful poster. [With:] Photographic essays, incl. The Vanguard and Drums of Life. Black is Beautiful. N.p.: n.p., ca late 1960s-early 1970s. 21 1/2 x 28 in. printed poster (light toning to edges, light edge wear). Three uniformed Black Panthers are featured standing on the steps of the Alameda County Court House, where Black Panther Minister of Defense Huey P. Newton stood trial from June to September 1968. After an image taken by Pirkle Jones on 30 July during a demonstration in support of Newton. BARUCH, Ruth-Marion (1922-1997) and Pirkle JONES (1914-2009. The Vanguard: A Photographic Essay on the Black Panthers. Boston: Beacon Press, 1970. 4to. Photographic plates throughout. Original publisher's illustrated wrappers (creasing and edge wear to wrappers). -- HIGGINS, Chester Jr. (b. 1946) and Orde COOMBS (1939-1984). Drums of Life: A Photograph Essay on the Black Man in America. Garden City, NY: Anchor Books, 1974. 4to. Photographic plates throughout. Original publisher's illustrated wrappers (full separation at spine between pages 28-29, creasing and edge wear to wrappers). Together, 3 items. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 73 - [BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. ROTH, J., artist. Shout My Laughter to the Stars. Poster Factory, 1972.

[BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. ROTH, J., artist. Shout My Laughter to the Stars. Poster Factory, 1972. 17 1/2 x 23 in. silkscreen poster (light creasing, light corner and edge wear). Pencil inscribed, signed, and numbered along left edge, "For People Who Need Heroes, 14/20, J. Roth, Poster Factory, 1972." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 74 - [BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. Black Politics: A Journal of Liberation. Berkeley, CA, 1968-1969. A group of 9 issues.

[BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. Black Politics: A Journal of Liberation. Berkeley, CA, 1968-1969. A group of 9 issues. 9 issues in 5 quarto volumes (approx. 8 1/2 x 11 in.), staple-bound mimeographed sheets (some toning to extremities, light wear, occasional spotting, near fine). January 1968 Vol. 1, No. 1; March 1968 Vol. 1., No. 3; “Special Issue - Huey P. Newton” April/May 1968 Vol. 1, Nos. 4 & 5; Summer 1968 Vol. 1, Nos. 6-8; “George Prosser on Terrorism and Sabotage, Mek Nimr on Israel, Onij-Nejjih on Student Strikes” Vol. 2, Nos. 13-14. Nine issues of the important journal of black liberation theory Black Politics: A Journal of Liberation. Published by Japanese-American Black Panther Richard Aoki (under the pseudonym Richard Assegai), white radical Tom Sanders, and Ed Turner, the journal was closely linked with the Black Panther Party and international socialism. Articles focus on Communism and global leftist politics, urban guerrilla warfare and weaponry, and the repression of the Panthers, especially Huey P. Newton with many of the writers using assumed names. The weaponry articles by George Prosser (pseudonym, possibly Tom Sanders) prompted congressional committee investigation. (Danky 970). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 75 - [BLACK PANTHERS]. A group of 2 flyers associated with the "Panther 21,"comprising:

[BLACK PANTHERS]. A group of 2 flyers associated with the "Panther 21,"comprising: May Day / Weekend Gathering to Show Solidarity for Panther Prisoners of War. [Black Panther Party], ca 1970. 8 1/2 x 11 in. printed flyer (creasing, toning). Flyer announces a weekend of events and rallies put on to show support for the "New Haven 9" and the "Panther 21." Events include workshops, "Teach-In's," dances, speeches, and more. Speakers include Artie Seale, Ralph Abernathy, "Big Man," Abbie Hoffman, and others. Verso includes detailed information about the prisoners and the multi-faceted purpose of May Day. In part: "The AmeriKKKan government has one plan for the Black Panther Party--attempting to smash--but has different tactics. In Chicago and L.A. the pigs carried out vigilante style raids. In New York and New Haven the more smooth eastern liberals like Lindsey hide behind the black robes of the racist courts in their attempt to hold our Black warriors as prisoners of war." US Out of Vietnam Now — No Negotiations! No Loosening of Rent Control! Free the Panther 21! [New York]: [Students for a Democratic Society], ca 1969. 8 1/2 x 14 in. printed flyer (creasing). Flyer announces a demonstration to take place on 15 April at City Hall Park, in response to the arrest and indictment of the Panther 21. In part: "We in SDS believe that the way to fight these vicious attacks on black people is allying with our fellow black and Puerto Rican students in fighting our common oppression. This means throwing R.O.T.C., which trains scab officers for duty in Vietnam, Harlem and the Brooklyn G.P.O, out of Fordham and City College...It means demonstrating against the 'Great Friend of the People'-Mayor Linsay-who is head of the city administration which is framing the Panther 21..." On 2 April 1969, 21 members of the Black Panther Party were arrested for conspiracy to coordinate bombing and rifle attacks on public spaces in New York City. Those arrested included Afeni Shakur, Lumumba Shakur, Ali Bey Hassan, Michael Tabor, Dhoruba al-Mujahid bin Wahad, Jamal Joseph, Abayama Katara, Baba Odinga, Joan Bird, Robert Collier, Sundiata Acoli, Lonnie Epps, Curtis Powell, Kuwasi Balagoon, Richard Harris, Lee Berry, Lee Roper, Kwando Kinshasa (William King), and Thomas Berry. The resulting trial was the longest and most expensive in New York history up to that point, lasting 8 months. The defendants were finally acquitted of all charges on 12 May 1971. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 76 - [BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. Newspapers, press photos, and original flyers related to protests and programs involving the Black Panther Party and its members.

[BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. Newspapers, press photos, and original flyers related to protests and programs involving the Black Panther Party and its members. Detroit is a Labor/Black Town / Fight Klan Terror! Detroit: Allied Printing, ca 1979. 8 1/2 x 11 in. printed flyer (creasing, toning, small rips to edges). Flyer announces a rally in Kennedy Square on 10 November at 1:00 and urges, "Be There!" A

Lot: 77 - [BLACK PANTHER PARTY -- CLEAVER, ELDRIDGE (1935-1998)]. A group of pamphlets by the Minister of Information of the Black Panther Party.

[BLACK PANTHER PARTY -- CLEAVER, ELDRIDGE (1935-1998)]. A group of pamphlets by the Minister of Information of the Black Panther Party. CLEAVER, Eldridge. On the Ideology of the Black Panther Party. [San Francisco, CA]: [Black Panther Party], n.d. 8vo (183 x 266 mm). Staple-bound original illustrated wrappers (minor wear). Includes an article by Cleaver outlining the ideology of the Black Panther Party, with emphasis on the Marxist-Leninist interpretation and identification of the party and its purposes. Also included at the back of the pamphlet is the "October 1966 Black Panther Party Platform and Program," as well as subscription information for the Black Panther, Black Community News Service. CLEAVER, Eldridge. Education and Revolution. N.p.: n.p., n.d. 8vo (173 x 242 mm). Staple-bound original illustrated wrappers (minimal wear). From Cleaver's treatise: "a revolution is not a game, it is a war. We are involved in a war—a people's war against those who oppress the people, and this is the war in the clearest sense of the word." CLEAVER, Eldridge. Revolution in the Congo. London: Stage 1 (for the Revolutionary Peoples' Communications Network), 1971. 8vo (126 x 205 mm). Staple-bound original illustrated wrappers (some wear and creasing to edges and corners). Cleaver expounds upon the importance of the revolution in the Congo to black revolutionary movements elsewhere in the world. [With:] SACHS, Patricia and J. Alvin KUGELMASS. The Black Panthers. New York: Universal Publishing and Distributing Corporation, 1969. 8vo (207 x 277 mm). Staple-bound soft cover (front cover missing, spotting/discoloration and creasing throughout). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 78 - [BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. A group of flyers and other ephemera related to the imprisonment of Bobby Seale and other Black Panther Party members.

[BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. A group of flyers and other ephemera related to the imprisonment of Bobby Seale and other Black Panther Party members. DOUGLAS, Emory (artist, b. 1942). The Black Panther Manifesto: The Fascists Have Already Decided in Advance to Murder Chairman Bobby Seale in the Electric Chair. San Francisco: Black Panther Party Legal Defense Fund, n.d. 11 x 17 in. printed poster (some creasing including horizontal central crease, minor spotting). Douglas, the graphic designer who worked as the Black Panther Minister of Culture created this arresting image of Bobby Seale strapped, barefoot in an electric chair. Seale had been arrested and sentenced to four years in prison as one of the original "Chicago Eight" charged with conspiracy and inciting a riot in the 1968 Democratic National Convention. Free / Bobby Seale / Ericka Huggins. N.p.: [C.U.P.P.], ca 1971. 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. printed handbill (minor chipping and creasing to edges and corners). Announces a rally to take place on 17 November, at the New Federal Building on Los Angeles Street in Los Angeles, CA. The rally will feature speakers from the Black Panther Party, the C.U.P.P., and the National united Committee to Free Angela Davis. "Their Trial Begins Today...If we fail to act now, the state will surely convict them. This will lay the foundation for future Murders. Angela's life, and thousands of other political prisoners are also at stake. At the rally we will discuss and plan future actions." And 2 other items, including a photocopied letter on Committee to Defend the Panthers letterhead asking for funds, and a photocopied flyer announcing a rally for political prisoners including Bobby Seale, Lonnie McLucas, Martin Sostre, the Soledad Brothers, and others. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 79 - [BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. A group of pamphlets and other ephemera related to the Black Panther Party including a Harlem health clinic flyer.

[BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. A group of pamphlets and other ephemera related to the Black Panther Party including a Harlem health clinic flyer. To the People of the Community...The Harlem Branch of the Black Panther Party is opening a health clinic... [New York]: [Black Panther Party], n.d. 8 1/2 x 14 in. printed flyer (creasing, discoloration, and light soiling throughout). Featuring a half-tone illustration of an armed female Black Panther passing off a child to an armed male Black Panther wearing a nurse's uniform with a panther logo on the sleeve and a stethoscope around his neck. "In order to open the People's Free Health Clinic, we need people from the community with skills in carpentry, electrical work, plumbing, to help us build the People's Free Health Clinic...With much help we can open in August." LANDY, Sy and Charles CAPPER. Black Power. [Berkeley, CA]: Independent Socialist Club, n.d. 8vo, 8 1/2 x 11 in. Staple-bound original illustrated wrappers (dampstaining, creasing). Pamphlet discusses a variety of topics related to "Black Power," including the evolving role of white student allies and the "white poor." The New African. Vol. 1, No. 6. New Orleans, LA: Black Nation News Service, Ministry of Information, 1 August 1970. 12pp., folio, 11 3/8 x 16 in. (creasing, chipping, markings to text and annotations throughout). And 2 other items, including a Registration form for the Revolutionary People's Plenary Session from 5-7 September 1970 and a pamphlet about the Soledad Brothers. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 80 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. A group of 9 pamphlets, circulars, and flyers involving Black activists, incl. Black Panther Party members.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. A group of 9 pamphlets, circulars, and flyers involving Black activists, incl. Black Panther Party members. WHITE, Charles. Free Angelo Herndon. New York, NY: Youth Publishers, 1934 (toning, some chipping to edges). Pamphlet produced in support of the imprisoned Black CPUSA member and labor organizer, Angelo Herndon, who was sentenced to 20 years in prison on a charge of

Lot: 81 - [BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. A group of 20 pinback buttons related to the Black Panther Party, Huey Newton, Angela Davis, anti-Vietnam sentiments, and other movements.

[BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. A group of 20 pinback buttons related to the Black Panther Party, Huey Newton, Angela Davis, anti-Vietnam sentiments, and other movements. 20 pinback buttons, approx. 2 in. diameter and smaller. Highlights include: 7 buttons related to the Black Panther Party, Huey Newton, and the Panther 21. -- 4 buttons calling for freedom for Angela Davis. -- 2 buttons expressing anti-Vietnam sentiments, including "Black People: 10% in US, 22% in Vietnam. Why?," and "GI Unity." -- "Vote Socialist Workers / Self Determination for Afro Americans." -- And 6 others. Together, 20 pinback buttons. Condition generally good, with toning, occasional soiling, wear consistent with age and use. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 82 - [CIVIL RIGHTS] -- [HEIGHT, Dorothy I. (1912-2010)]. "Progress Report" issued by the National Council of Negro Women, Inc. June 1969.

[CIVIL RIGHTS] -- [HEIGHT, Dorothy I. (1912-2010)]. "Progress Report" issued by the National Council of Negro Women, Inc. June 1969. 8vo (8 x 10 7/8 in.) 22pp., staple-bound typed report (some wear to cover page, few spots of discoloration). Report regarding the "Self-Help Campaign Against Hunger" outlines the objective of the program along with details regarding the progress made in various components. A letter of application submitted by the National Council of Negro Women to the Federal Secretary of Agriculture (along with the reply) is also included in the report. Founded in 1935 with the goal of creating opportunities and improving the standard of living for African American women, their families, and communities, the National Council of Negro Women became known for its many self-help community programs in the 1960s, such as the one reported on here. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 83 - [BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. Free Angela Davis Now! New York: Committee to Free Angela Davis, ca 1970.

[BLACK PANTHER PARTY]. Free Angela Davis Now! New York: Committee to Free Angela Davis, ca 1970. 16 3/4 x 21 1/2 in. printed poster (minimal edge wear). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 84 - [CIVIL RIGHTS] -- [DAVIS, Angela Yvonne (b.1944 )]. Wanted by the FBI: Interstate Flight - Murder, Kidnaping [sic]. Washington, D.C.: Federal Bureau of Investigation, 18 August 1970.

[CIVIL RIGHTS] -- [DAVIS, Angela Yvonne (b.1944 )]. Wanted by the FBI: Interstate Flight - Murder, Kidnaping [sic]. Washington, D.C.: Federal Bureau of Investigation, 18 August 1970. 10 1/2 x 16 in. FBI "Wanted" poster (creases at folds). Poster features two images of Davis, descriptions of her physical characteristics, and details on the nature of her alleged offenses. Verso lists addresses and telephone numbers for FBI field offices as well as FBI return address and postage paid imprints. Following an armed takeover of a courtroom in Marin County, California, in which four persons were killed, it was determined that guns owned by Angela Davis were utilized in the commissioning of the crime. Davis was charged in connection with the courtroom killings, and a warrant was issued for her arrest. On August 18, 1970, four days after the warrant was issued, the FBI director J. Edgar Hoover listed Davis on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List. [With:] Vintage brown cotton t-shirt with collar and sleeves trimmed in white, size large, ca 1980-1984, featuring a silhouetted image of Angela Davis and text: "Angela Davis / Vice Presidential Candiddate [sic] / Communist Party, USA / Saturday, April 12, 3:00pm / Student Union Ballroom / University of Massachusetts / Amherst." Long politically active, Angela Davis ran as the Communist Party USA's nominee for vice president in 1980 and 1984, alongside running mate Gus Hall, General Secretary of the Communist Party USA. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 85 - [DAVIS, Angela (b. 1944)]. Angela Davis Urges - Declare Your Independence, Vote for Hall and Tyner. Hall-Tyner Election Campaign Committee: New York, 1976.

[DAVIS, Angela (b. 1944)]. Angela Davis Urges - Declare Your Independence, Vote for Hall and Tyner. Hall-Tyner Election Campaign Committee: New York, 1976. 15 1/2 x 22 1/4 in. halftone poster (light toning to margins, some creasing, light chipping, and few small tears at edges). Produced for the 1976 presidential campaign of Communist Party USA candidate Gus Hall (1959-2000) and his running mate Jarvis Tyner (b.1941). The poster features a large portrait of Davis orating and a plea for voters to sign a petition to include Hall and Tyner on the ballot. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 86 - [DAVIS, ANGELA (b. 1944)]. 5 items, incl. posters, flyers, and a photograph documenting the effort to acquit Angela Davis, ca 1970-1977.

[DAVIS, ANGELA (b. 1944)]. 5 items, incl. posters, flyers, and a photograph documenting the effort to acquit Angela Davis, ca 1970-1977. Lot comprised of four posters and one photograph dating from the incarceration of Angela Davis in connection with the Marin County Civil Center Attack and the resulting effort to "Free Angela Davis" prior to her acquittal. Items include: A Rally for Angela. San Francisco, CA, 1972. 17 1/4 x 22 3/4 in. poster mounted on board advertising a meeting to take place at the Longshoremens' Hall in San Francisco (central vertical crease, chips, some loss to edges and corners). Angela Davis l'enchainement. Stand-Art, 1977. 22 1/2 x 30 in. poster produced for a film by Jean-Daniel Simon from 1977 (folds). -- Committee to Free Angela Davis Presents "A Family Affair" Dance. 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. flyer for a dance (toning). Philadelphia, PA, 17 December 1971. --7 1/4 x 14 in. double-sided flyer for the book If They Come in the Morning: Voices of Resistance, edited by Angela Davis. -- 4 5/8 x 6 3/4 in. press photograph of Davis dated 18 August 1970, with typed caption affixed to verso describing the image (penciled notations and ink stamps on verso). Together, 5 items identified to Angela Davis. Condition generally good. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 87 - [CRIME & PUNISHMENT]. SHAKUR, ASSATA (b. 1947). Wanted by FBI / Joanne Deborah Chesimard. Washington, DC: Federal Bureau of Investigation, 10 February 1972.

[CRIME & PUNISHMENT]. SHAKUR, ASSATA (b. 1947). Wanted by FBI / Joanne Deborah Chesimard. Washington, DC: Federal Bureau of Investigation, 10 February 1972. 8 x 8 in. printed poster (2 double holes punched along upper edge, toning to left and bottom edges, original postal adhesive attached on verso). This poster, mailed to the Danville Hotel in Danville, VA, includes photographs taken of Shakur in 1971, and cites a federal warrant issued on 17 January 1872 charging her with bank robbery. Assata Shakur, born JoAnne Deborah Byron, joined the Black Panthers in 1970, leading the Harlem chapter and coordinating the Free Breakfast Program for children, free clinics, and community outreach. She became disillusioned and joined the militant offshoot Black Liberation Army which used violent tactics to engage in an armed struggle with the United States government. She began using the name Assata Olugbala Shakur in 1971 stating that her birth name was a "slave name." Between 1971 and 1973, the Black Liberation Army is believed to have robbed several banks, kidnapped, and attempted murder of police officers. Shakur was personally charged with several of these crimes, notably the murder of a New Jersey state trooper on 2 May 1973. Although she pled not guilty and many viewed the prosecution as political, she was convicted in 1977. She escaped prison in 1979 and fled to Cuba. She was included on the FBI Most Wanted Terrorists list since 2013, notably the first woman to be included on the list, making her the most wanted woman in America. Appiah and Gates, Africana pp. 1697-1698. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 88 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. Afro-American Weekend. University of Detroit Student Union, 11-12 February 1972. [With:] Speak-Out Against the War. Wayne State University, Detroit.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. Afro-American Weekend. University of Detroit Student Union, 11-12 February 1972. [With:] Speak-Out Against the War. Wayne State University, Detroit. Afro-American Weekend presented by the Black Forum & U.S.G. Detroit, MI, 1972. 10.75 x 17 in. poster printed on thin cardstock (minimal wear). Portraits of Black subjects are presented beside an outline of the weekend activities, which includes "play and poetry by Black Theater Workshop," displays including "black business and International Afro-American Museum," and workshops ranging from "police-community relations" and "drugs" to "black movement in America." [With:] Lincoln Lynch, Associate National Director of Congress of Racial Equality, Rev. Albert Cleage, and other Speakers, Speak-Out Against the War. Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, 12 October n.d., ca late 1960s. 11 x 8 1/2 in. printed flyer for Black power "Speak-Out" (toning to margins, loss to lower left edge). Lincoln Orville Lynch (1920-2011) was a Jamaican-American civil rights activist and Royal Air Force veteran. From 1966-1967, he served as Associate Director and Vice Chairman of CORE's national leadership and was one of the first civil rights activists to speak out against America's involvement in the Vietnam War. Albert B. Cleage Jr. (1911-2000) was a Black nationalist Christian minister, political organizer and candidate, newspaper publisher, and author. He founded the Shrine of the Black Madonna Church, as well as the Shrine Cultural Centers and Bookstores in Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, and Houston, TX. Cleage played an important role in the Civil Rights Movement in Detroit during the 1960s and 1970s. Together, 2 posters. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 89 - [CIVIL RIGHTS] -- SUTTON, Percy E. (1920-2009). "A Strategy Paper" written for the National Black Political Convention. Gary, Indiana. 11 March 1972.

[CIVIL RIGHTS] -- SUTTON, Percy E. (1920-2009). "A Strategy Paper" written for the National Black Political Convention. Gary, Indiana. 11 March 1972. Typed "Statement by Percy E. Sutton / President, Borough of Manhattan / at Gary, Indiana, Sunday, March 11th." 13pp, 8 1/2 x 14 in. (toning, light wear). Suttons writes at length regarding Black political history and power, urging a new course for the Black community: "I suggest that it is possible for Black people to develop a strategy, to develop unity and power, at the 1972 national convention. We can force, at least, the Democratic Party to react to a strategy developed and executed by Black Americans. / We gather here at Gary, Indiana to, among other things, talk of a national strategy. We gather to put a halt to our being used in strategy of others. We gather to gain power; not to give up power." Sutton later outlines the purpose of the convention as he sees it: "first to set forth a program for the achievement of Black political and economic power and secondly to unite behind a Black presidential candidacy which will serve as the symbol and the focus of a new national Black political movement." He ultimately concludes by advocating the candidacy of Congresswoman Shirley Chisolm. The National Black Political Convention, or the "Gary Convention," was held March 10-12, 1972, in Gary, Indiana. Approximately ten thousand African Americans gathered to strategize ways in which the community could increase the number of Black politicians in office and advocate for fundamental economic, societal, and political change to benefit Black communities. Though the convention was headlined by notables including Richard Hatcher, Jesse Jackson, and Charles C. Diggs, Jr., Percy E. Sutton would have been a highly-respected and widely recognized voice on behalf of the African American community. Sutton was a longtime activist in the Civil Rights Movement. He served as an intelligence officer with the Tuskegee Airmen, a Freedom Rider, served as legal counsel to Malcolm X, and was an influential leader in Harlem politics. In September 1966 he was elected Borough President of Manhattan, remaining in the post until 1977. It was while serving in this capacity that Sutton authored this powerful statement for the National Black Convention. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 90 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. 40+ press photographs, most featuring prominent African American subjects of the 20th century.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. 40+ press photographs, most featuring prominent African American subjects of the 20th century. 44 silver gelatin photographs, most being press prints, covering important events and figures in African American history, especially the Civil Rights Movement. Ranging in size from 7 x 9 in. to 8 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. Most with captions either printed in the negative or affixed to recto or verso. Many with UPI stamp to verso. A few others credited to AP and ACME. Highlights include: 8 photos related to the death of Malcolm X, including 6 capturing views of his funeral and burial, and 3 photos capturing the aftermath of his death, including an image of followers bowing in Ferncliff Cemetery, an image of police cars guarding the University of Islam and Muhammad's Temple #2 to prevent possible revenge attacks, and an image from inside a Black Muslim National Convention where Elijah Muhammad reportedly criticized Malcolm X, saying he "got what he preached." -- One photo credited to Y. R. Okamoto featuring Martin Luther King, Jr. about to shake hands with Lyndon Johnson. In-negative caption reads, "President Johnson is congratulated by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King following the signing of the Voting Rights bill, Aug. 6, 1965. The Rev. Ralph Abernathy is on Dr. King's right." Additional inscriptions and additional caption affixed to verso. -- One photo featuring a crowd of demonstrators outside of Selma City Hall on 19 March 1965. In-negative caption reads, "A group of about 300 persons marched from Browns Church to Selma city hall in a peaceful demonstration here just before noon...The group, swelled by out-state persons congregating here for Selma to Montgomery march, stood in front of the city hall and listened to speeches from Negro leaders." UPI stamp to verso. -- One photo of an African American woman punching a white police captain, grabbing his baton with her other hand, in the aftermath of a rally on 30 August 1967. In-negative caption reads, "A negro rally in Milwaukee 8/30 ended when police acting on orders from the mayor, moved in and arrested most of the 200. This woman fought with a police captain on the way to the paddy wagon." UPI stamp to verso. -- And many more. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 91 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. Jet. 250 issues (incomplete run). Chicago, IL: Johnson Publishing Co., 1952-1970.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. Jet. 250 issues (incomplete run). Chicago, IL: Johnson Publishing Co., 1952-1970. 1952 (1 issue). -- 1953 (2 issues). -- 1954 (15 issues). -- 1955 (15 issues). -- 1956 (16 issues). -- 1957 (5 issues). -- 1958 (7 issues). -- 1959 (2 issues). -- 1960 (6 issues). -- 1961 (8 issues). -- 1962 (23 issues). -- 1963 (16 issues). -- 1964 (12 issues). -- 1965 (17 issues). Includes "Untold Drama of the March on Montgomery." -- 1966 (15 issues). -- 1967 (13 issues). Includes "Aretha [Franklin] Bounces Back!" and "World's Fastest Human" (Charlie Greene). -- 1968 (36 issues). Includes "New Shift in Strategy for Poor People's Campaign" and "Black Men Who Helped RFK" (Robert F. Kennedy). -- 1969 (25 issues). Includes "Tragic Report: Hunger in the United States," "New Surge in Afro-American History," and "Banks: Best Cub in History of Baseball." -- 1970 (18 issues). Includes "Is Baseball Ready for a Black Manager?" and "Jackie Robinson Joins War Against Dope in Ghettos." Together, approx. 250 issues of Jet. Condition fair to good. Occasional spotting, dampstaining and soiling, some with address labels or scribbled notations. [With:] Jet Exclusive! On Sale Now! 10 1/4 x 13 1/4 in. advertisement printed on cardstock promoting Jet's 23 March 1967 issue, which features "The Greatest Interracial Love Story Ever Told," involving the relationship between Giovanna Agusta and Jose Germano (chipping, some loss to edges). Founded in November 1951 by John H. Johnson (1918-2005), Jet magazine is considered one of the most influential African American media businesses and chronicled the Civil Rights Movement including early events like the lynching of Emmett Till. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 92 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. "Christmas is a Time of Brotherly Love." 20 unused Christmas cards featuring African American and white subjects. No. Brunswick, NJ: Harrowsmith, Inc., ca 1970.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. "Christmas is a Time of Brotherly Love." 20 unused Christmas cards featuring African American and white subjects. No. Brunswick, NJ: Harrowsmith, Inc., ca 1970. 20 printed, unused Christmas cards, each 4 1/2 x 7 in., accompanied by original envelopes and housed in cardboard box (very good condition, light toning, light wear to box). The front, which states, "Christmas is a Time of Brother Love," presents a rendering of African American and white male subjects draping their arms around each other, and the interior contains an uplifting holiday message, "May it prevail in the hearts of all men at all times in all seasons." The cards were purportedly created by an African American sports figure based in North Brunswick, New Jersey. An uncommon group of uplifting holiday cards that received very limited distribution. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 93 - [BLACK POWER]. A group of 2 blacklight posters on velvet, incl. Pantheress and Panther. [Ca 1970].

[BLACK POWER]. A group of 2 blacklight posters on velvet, incl. Pantheress and Panther. [Ca 1970]. Pantheress. Chicago: One Stop Posters, [ca 1970]. 22 7/8 x 35 in. velvet blacklight poster (light creasing and chipping to edges, slight loss to right edge). -- Panther. Chicago: One Stop Posters, [ca 1970]. 22 7/8 x 35 in. velvet blacklight poster (light creasing and chipping to edges, short tear to lower margin). -- Together, 2 blacklight posters on velvet. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 94 - [BLACK POWER]. A group of 5 Black Power blacklight/Day-Glo posters, comprising:

[BLACK POWER]. A group of 5 Black Power blacklight/Day-Glo posters, comprising: War Queen. 1970. -- GOODE, George, artist. Man and Woman I. 1970 (signed in image) ((some loss to top right and bottom left corners, marginal chipping and creasing). -- GOODE, George, artist. Now! Free My Mind. 1971 (signed in image). -- GOODE, George, artist. Afro-Love. 1971 (signed in image) (short tear near top edge). -- Together, 4 blacklight posters, each Uvalde and Houston, TX: Houston Blacklight & Poster Dist. Co., Inc., each approx. 21 3/4 x 34 in., condition fine, with occasional short marginal tears and chipping. The artist George Goode created artworks that featured "Black fantasy warriors" published by the Houston Black Light Company. Two examples here have Goode's signature printed in image, however, others are also likely his work. (David Ensminger, "Black Light Panthers: The Politics of Fluorescence". Art in Print. Vol. 5, No. 2, July-August 2015, p.17) [With:] The Panther and the Guardians. Chicago, IL: Apogee Posters, Inc., 1972. 22 3/8 x 34 1/2 in. blacklight poster (few marginal chips, creases, slight loss to lower right corner). Together, 5 posters. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 95 - [BLACK POWER]. Right On. Poster featuring raised fist. N.p., n.d., ca 1970s.

[BLACK POWER]. Right On. Poster featuring raised fist. N.p., n.d., ca 1970s. 20 x 28 1/4 in. poster (some creasing and wear to edges, occasional soiling to margins). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 96 - [SOUTH AFRICA]. A group of 3 Anti-Apartheid posters, comprising:

[SOUTH AFRICA]. A group of 3 Anti-Apartheid posters, comprising: CUSHING, Lincoln, artist. End Apartheid. Berkeley, CA: Inkworks Press, 1985. 22 x 18 in., poster (toning to top right corner resulting from tape on verso, light edge wear). A man's face and hands are superimposed over South Africa, with text reading, "South Africa / Must Be Free / Divest Now." Issued by the Bay Area Free South Africa Movement (BAFSAM), an anti-apartheid organization established in 1984. The group, born from demonstrations against the unloading of South African cargo from ships docked in San Francisco, began meeting regularly at East Oakland's First Universe Baptist Church and emphasized similarities between the racism and oppression in South Africa and the racism and economic oppression facing African Americans in California. [With:] MONTOYA, Malaquias, artist. Hey Soweto. N.p.: Tolbert Small, 1977. 23 1/2 x 18 1/2 in. poster (some wear, including dampstaining, creasing, short tears to margins). The poster features Tolbert Small's poem, Hew Soweto, comprised of four columns of text against a backdrop depicting South African warriors with spears behind barbed wire. The poem contrasts life under apartheid with life before South Africa's colonization. Copyrighted lower right by Dr. Tolbert Small, who ran a medical clinic for the Black Panther Party. [Also with:] DAVIS, Lenora, and BREEN, Axie, artists. Freeing South Africa, Freeing Ourselves. N.p.: Salsedo Press, [1985]. 23 1/2 x 17 3/4 in. poster (light creasing, light edge wear). A poster produced by the Free South Africa Movement, with partial funding by the Playboy Foundation, featuring a rendering of two hands, one bound by chains and the other by rope, each freeing the other. Together, 3 posters. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 97 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. A small archive of items related to the Scottsboro Trial, including

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. A small archive of items related to the Scottsboro Trial, including Save Our Lives, They Must Not Burn Dec. 7, Join the Fight to Free Them! New York: Scottsboro-Herndon Defense Fund, n.d. Small 8vo pamphlet (central vertical crease, horizontal rip to front page, dampstaining, and wear to edges and corners). Includes a tear-away mail-in slip for donation to the Scottsboro Herndon Defense Fund. Back page includes facsimile letter from Patterson and Norris, expressing a desire to be represented by Walter Pollack and Osmond Fraenkel. HERNDON, Angelo. The Scottsboro Boys: Four Freed! Five to Go! New York: Workers Library Publishers, Inc., 1937. Small 8vo. (Some clipping to corners, slight chipping and rips to some pages.) Original illustrated wrappers (clipped right corners, toning). Flash. Vol. 1, No. 22. Washington, DC: Flash Publishing Company, 2 August 1937. 8 7/8 x 11 7/8 in. Staple-bound original wrappers (multiple pages fully separated from binding, chipping and loss to edges, discoloration throughout). Issue features a 2-page article entitled "Five Scottsboro Boys Will Not Die" including an image of Ozie Powell preparing to have a bullet removed from his head after being shot by Sheriff Sandlin. The "Scottsboro Boys" as they came to be called, were a group of nine African American preteens, teenagers, and young men falsely accused of raping two white women on a freight train in northern Alabama in March of 1931. Eight of the defendants were convicted and sentenced to death by an all-white jury, while the ninth was granted a mistrial by the judge on account of his youth. Public outcry and protests in the north succeeded in getting the convictions overturned by the Supreme Court in 1932, citing the defendants' inadequate legal representation. The process of retrial, reconviction, and appeal went on for years, and ultimately the "Scottsboro Boys" served a collective 100+ years in prison. The Scottsboro cases, or rather the widespread indignation and national dialogue they sparked, led to two important Supreme Court decisions reached in 1935 regarding the exclusion of African Americans from jury service. The injustice suffered by the "Scottsboro Boys" also inspired a myriad of popular works including Richard Wright's 1940 novel, Native Son. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 98 - [TILL, EMMETT (1941-1955)]. BURNHAM, Louis E. Behind the Lynching of Emmet Louis Till. New York: Freedom Associates, Inc., 1955.

[TILL, EMMETT (1941-1955)]. BURNHAM, Louis E. Behind the Lynching of Emmet Louis Till. New York: Freedom Associates, Inc., 1955. 8vo, (Some minor discoloration). Original wrappers, staple bound (rusting to staples). FIRST EDITION pamphlet regarding the abduction, brutal beating, and murder of Emmett Till by Roy Bryant and J.W. Milam. Burnham begins: "In all the foul record of human oppression, few crimes have matched in unbridled savagery the kidnap-murder of Emmett Louis Till. The discovery of the fiendishly mutilated body of this 14-year-ld Chicago boy in Mississippi's Tallahatchie River on August 28, 1955, revealed more than the handiwork of a pair of hate-crazed 'white supremacists.'" He goes on to lay out the denial of human and constitutional rights to all Black people in the southern United States through the plantation economy and the white ruling class, ending with a call to action for "all citizens everywhere" to speak up and urge their Congressmen to enforce the Constitution. [With:] 10 1/8 x 13 1/2 in. cardstock printed ad (chipping, loss to edges and corners). Promoting the December 1955 issue of Ebony magazine featuring "The Emmett Till Story." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 99 - [CIVIL RIGHTS] -- [DESEGREGATION]. FAUBUS, Orval E. (1910-1994). Typed letter signed ("Orval E. Faubus"), as Governor of Arkansas, regarding the Little Rock Affair. [Little Rock, Arkansas], 3 January 1958.

[CIVIL RIGHTS] -- [DESEGREGATION]. FAUBUS, Orval E. (1910-1994). Typed letter signed ("Orval E. Faubus"), as Governor of Arkansas, regarding the Little Rock Affair. [Little Rock, Arkansas], 3 January 1958. Addressed to Mr. Eli Walker of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. On "State of Arkansas / Office of the Governor / Little Rock" letterhead. 1p, 8 1/2 x 1 1 in. (creasing at folds and corner staple, light wear). Faubus responds to Walker's inquiry about the status of "Negro Student[s]" at Little Rock School, writing: "Please be advised that the 9 Negro children are still attending Central High School, and approximately 425 former Arkansas National Guardsmen are still under federal jurisdiction. It is my considered judgement that President Eisenhower would like to forget all about the Little Rock affair, and I doubt if there will ever be a recurrence of this particular situation." A handwritten note in Faubus's hand appears below the signature, and reads "One student is suspended from school attendance at this time for dumping her food tray on a white by student's head." [With:] Typed letter from Mr. Eli Walker to Governor Orval Faubus, attached by staple in left corner to the Governor's reply. N.p., 25 December 1957. 1p, 8 1/2 x 11 in. (creasing at folds). "The Little Rock Nine" were a group of nine African American students enrolled in the all-white Little Rock Central High School in 1957 following the historic U.S. Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education. Governor Orval Faubus opposed desegregation, and initially prevented the Black students from entering the segregated school by calling out the Arkansas National Guard on 4 September 1957 to prevent their entrance. In response, President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued an Executive Order federalizing the Arkansas National Guard and ordering the soldiers to protect the students and support the integration. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 100 - [CIVIL RIGHTS -- SEGREGATION]. Montgomery bus sign, "Colored / Please Do Not Move Board." [Montgomery, AL], [1949].

[CIVIL RIGHTS -- SEGREGATION]. Montgomery bus sign, "Colored / Please Do Not Move Board." [Montgomery, AL], [1949]. Wood sign for a segregated bus, 10 x 5 in., approx. 3/4 in. depth, with two even-sized holes in the base. Hand-painted in pale green with hand-stenciled silver letters. One side with "Colored / Please Do Not / Move Board" and reverse with ""White / Please Do Not / Move Board" (losses to paint and to portions of wood board, particularly on "Colored" side). Provenance: Consignor relates that his father, who had moved to Alabama from Cleveland, Ohio, removed the sign from a Montgomery bus in 1949. A note handwritten by the consignor's father in 1993 accompanies the sign, and reads in part: "Taken from a Montgomery, AL bus in 1949." A powerful remnant of the segregated South. Just six years after this sign was removed, Rosa Parks' arrest would launch the Montgomery bus boycott.

Lot: 101 - [CIVIL RIGHTS - SEGREGATION]. Colored Seat to the Rear. Bus sign. N.p., n.d.

[CIVIL RIGHTS - SEGREGATION]. Colored Seat to the Rear. Bus sign. N.p., n.d. 20 x 4 in. metal sign painted white with black lettering (wear consistent with age and use, bending, significant surface scratching throughout). Jim Crow-era sign featuring 1/8 in. mounting holes on right and left sides. Provenance: Consignor relates that the sign was originally found in Georgia. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 102 - [CIVIL RIGHTS - SEGREGATION]. Colored Entrance. Building sign. N.p., n.d.

[CIVIL RIGHTS - SEGREGATION]. Colored Entrance. Building sign. N.p., n.d. 18 x 7 in. metal sign painted black with gold lettering (wear consistent with age and use, bending, some rusting, surface scratching throughout, yellow and red paint on reverse side). Jim Crow-era sign featuring 1/8 in. mounting hole at each corner. Provenance: Consignor relates that sign was originally found in Georgia. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 103 - JACKSON, Samuel L., ed. Jackson's International Almanac: A Pocket Encyclopedia of the Negro. [New York]: [Vanguard], [1940].

JACKSON, Samuel L., ed. Jackson's International Almanac: A Pocket Encyclopedia of the Negro. [New York]: [Vanguard], [1940]. 18mo (122 x 160 mm). (Some page corners creased, few ink markings to text.) Original wrappers, staple bound (wear and discoloration). Pamphlet provides demographic information, being "Negro and Total Population" for cities in the United States, the principal islands of the West Indies, African cities, and "Negro Territories controlled by whites;" demographic and political information for Ethiopia, Haiti, and Liberia; biographical sketches of prominent Black political and cultural leaders; and more. RARE: OCLC locates only one copy. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 104 - [SEGREGATION]. Boy-Cott Stag Beer. Stop Before You Buy. Are you A Stag Beer Drinker? If You Are, You are Drinking Segregation. [Memphis, TN]: N.A.P.A., n.d., [1964?].

[SEGREGATION]. Boy-Cott Stag Beer. Stop Before You Buy. Are you A Stag Beer Drinker? If You Are, You are Drinking Segregation. [Memphis, TN]: N.A.P.A., n.d., [1964?]. 6 x 8 15/16 in. printed handbill on light orange paper (very minor wear to edges and corners). A handbill encouraging a boycott of Stag beer in response to the lack of African American representation in A.S. Barboro Distribution, Stag's Memphis distributor. The issuing organization "N.A.P.A." remains unidentified but was almost certainly a local civil rights organization. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 105 - [SEGREGATION]. Notice! Stop Help Save the Youth of America. Don't Buy Negro Records. New Orleans, LA: Citizens' Council of Greater New Orleans, n.d., [ca 1960s].

[SEGREGATION]. Notice! Stop Help Save the Youth of America. Don't Buy Negro Records. New Orleans, LA: Citizens' Council of Greater New Orleans, n.d., [ca 1960s]. 5 7/8 x 8 7/8 in. printed handbill on green-gray paper(toning to edges and center). Racist handbill decrying the effect of "negro records" on white youth: "The screaming, idiotic words, and savage music of these records are undermining the morals of our white youth in America...Don't Let Your Children Buy, or Listen To These Negro Records." The Citizens' Council, also known as the White Citizens' Council, was formed in Indianola, Mississippi, following the United States Supreme Court's landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling. Formed initially by white supremacists and segregationists in Mississippi, the organization established additional chapters throughout the south in later years. Council members often included prominent white citizens such as businessmen, law enforcement, publishers, lawmakers, and civic and religious leaders. Council activities included voter suppression, economic harassment, publication of racist books, and the establishment of segregated schools. While the Citizens' Councils officially eschewed the public violence associated with the KKK, the two organizations worked closely together, and some Councils, including the Citizens' Council of Greater New Orleans, directly incited violence against members of the African American community. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 106 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. A pair of flyers denouncing Philadelphia Police Commissioner Frank Rizzo.

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. A pair of flyers denouncing Philadelphia Police Commissioner Frank Rizzo. 4 1/4 x 9 1/8 in. printed handbill on yellow paper (creasing, soiling, toning). Let's Have a Black Christmas. Boycott All Merchants...Rizzo Must Go. [Philadelphia, PA]: n.p., [1967]. Flyer calls for a boycott of "All Merchants," urging: "Don't Spend Your Green Power with White Power Until They Respect Black Power / Rizzo Must Go." 8 1/2 x 11 in. printed flyer (spotting, creasing, soiling). Cisco-Kidd Pig Rizzo Oinks Again! [Philadelphia]: [Black Panther Party], ca 1970. Recto features a statement from Rizzo upholding the actions of Philadelphia policemen in the shooting of a Black man by the name of Harold Brown, along with typewritten assertions that "Rizzo and his maniacs must be brought to justice!!" Verso features photocopied news article about the death of James Hamilton. The Black Panther logo and photocopied handwriting asserting that Hamilton was murdered and the press is untruthful fill in the right margin. Francis "Frank" Rizzo (1920-1991) was appointed commissioner of the Philadelphia Police Department from in 1967. In November of that same year, Black public high school students staged a walk out to protest racial inequalities in their schools. Rizzo's aggressive response to that protest (sending in police officers who brutalized students, sending many to the hospital and others to jail) provoked the "Black Christmas Boycott" promoted by the first flyer featured here. The second flyer was produced following the deaths of Harold Brown and James Hamilton, two Black men killed by Philadelphia police officers. Amidst multiple demonstrations and calls for Rizzo's dismissal, he not only kept his position as commissioner, but was also elected mayor of the city, serving from 1972-1980. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 107 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. A group of 3 pamphlets addressing Civil Rights and discrimination, comprising:

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. A group of 3 pamphlets addressing Civil Rights and discrimination, comprising: CROSBY, Alexander L. Discrimination in Housing in these 10 Cities: Charlottesville, Sledge, Phoenix, Los Angeles, Denver, Springfield, Chicago, Detroit, Waterbury, and New York. New York, NY: Public Affairs Committee, 1951, Second Printing. 11 x 8 1/8 in., 30pp (some toning, light soiling to margins). A pamphlet that "tells how minorities are housed in ten communities of the United States. The house generally determines the family's place in the community. A segregated house leads to discrimination in schools, churches, employment, and recreation." Plentifully illustrated with photographs by Marion Palfi. [With:] Poor Black Women. Boston, MA: New England Free Press, ca 1968-1969. 8 1/2 x 11 in., 4pp (toning to margins, minor edge wear). Printed pamphlet containing the following essays: "Birth Control Pills and Black Children," a statement by the Black Unity party; "A Response," by "black sisters"; and "Poor Black Women," by Patricia Robinson, in which she examines oppression not only by white people but also by men in general. -- PROCTOR, Roscoe. Black Workers and the Class Struggle. New York, NY: New Outlook Publishers, February 1972. 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. pamphlet, 37pp (toning to wrappers, light soiling to first 5 pages). A communist publication addressing concerns involving Black workers. The pamphlet also includes a political advertisement for the Communist ticket for the 1972 presidential election, as well as advertisements for other communist publications. Together, 3 pamphlets. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 108 - [CIVIL RIGHTS]. A group of 4 pamphlets related to the fight against segregation and racial inequality, comprising:

[CIVIL RIGHTS]. A group of 4 pamphlets related to the fight against segregation and racial inequality, comprising: PECK, Jim, ed. Sit Ins: The Students Report. New York: Congress of Racial Equality, 1960. 8vo (153 x 215 mm). Staple-bound original illustrated wrappers (vertical central crease throughout pamphlet from old fold, light toning). Includes six letters from students detailing their experiences participating in sit-ins across the country, with an introductory letter by Lillian Smith entitled, "Only the Young and the Brave." PECK, Jim, and Alexander L. CROSBY, eds. A First Step Toward School Integration. New York: Congress of Racial Equality, 1958. 8vo (152 x 216 mm). Staple-bound original illustrated wrappers (vertical central crease throughout pamphlet from old fold, toning and occasional spots of discoloration throughout). Features an article by Anna Holden narrating the desegregation in Nashville schools in the fall of 1957 and the way a CORE group supported parents and children through the process. A foreword by Martin Luther King, Jr. concludes: "The key to success in Nashville was CORE's policy of backing up the parents—by visiting them and by escorting their children to integrated schools. If Little Rock had had a strong interracial group, Governor Faubus might have been checked without the use of federal troops." 5 & 10c End Jim-Crow in Woolworths. [New York, NY]: New York Youth Congress], n.d. 8vo (138 x 210 mm). Original illustrated wrappers (some wear, creasing). Pamphlet discusses the discrimination against young Black women applying for jobs at Woolworth stores. Freedom Now: New Stage in the Struggle for Negro Emancipation. New York: Pioneer Publishers (for the Socialist Workers Party), 1963. 8vo (154 x 228 mm). Staple-bound original illustrated wrappers (chipping, loss, creasing throughout, some ink underlining to text). Reprinted from the Fall 1963 issue of the International Socialist Review, the article featured in this pamphlet, in part, discusses the role of the Socialists Workers Party in the "negro struggle." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 109 - [BUSINESS -- WALKER, Madam C.J. (born Sarah Breedlove, 1867-1919)]. The Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Manual: A Thorough Treatise Covering All Branches of Beauty Culture. FIRST EDITION. Indianapolis: The Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Co. Inc., ca 1928.

[BUSINESS -- WALKER, Madam C.J. (born Sarah Breedlove, 1867-1919)]. The Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Manual: A Thorough Treatise Covering All Branches of Beauty Culture. FIRST EDITION. Indianapolis: The Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Co. Inc., ca 1928. 8vo, original blue cloth, lettered in white (some loss to title on spine, rubbing to extremities, light soil, blue cloth somewhat blotchy). 211pp followed by 3pp of advertisements for "Madam C.J. Walker's Superfine Preparations for the Hair and Skin" and index (scattered dampstaining, light soil, occasional tears). Illustrated throughout with line drawings and black and white photographs. Inscribed (presumably in original owner's hand) with name and address: "Mary E. Hamilton / 1422 N 'G' Street / Richmond, Ind." A scarce example of this important manual, with OCLC locating no libraries with the First Edition. Mary Ethel Hamilton Calhoun (1916-1989) was born in Richmond, Indiana. The 1940 US Federal Census indicates that she was a 24-year-old "Neg[ro]" woman, living at home in Richmond, and working as a "Beautician" at a "Beauty Shop." Her obituary indicates that she was "a graduate of Madam Walker School of Cosmetology in Indianapolis and had been a self-employed beautician many years." [With:] A modern color photograph showing a two-story home, with modern ink inscription on verso reading in part: "Mary Calhoun's Beauty Shop @ 239 S. 13th St. Richmond, IN." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 110 - [BUSINESS]. Travel Guide of Negro Hotels and Guest Houses. Published by Afro-American Newspapers of Baltimore, Washington, Philadelphia, Newark, and Richmond, [ca 1942].

[BUSINESS]. Travel Guide of Negro Hotels and Guest Houses. Published by Afro-American Newspapers of Baltimore, Washington, Philadelphia, Newark, and Richmond, [ca 1942]. 1 sheet folded to 4 1/4 x 8 1/2 in. pamphlet (wear consistent with age and use, soiling and creasing throughout, ink stamp and penciled markings). Provenance: Estate of African American photographer, Johnnie R. Crump (1905-1975) (ink stamp on back of guide). Featuring a travel map compiled by the Afro Travel Bureau and a state by state listing of hotels and guest houses East of the Mississippi River. Also with a listing of YMCAs and YWCAs located throughout the US and large advertisement section. Johnnie Crump, a self-taught photographer, documented the lives of Black subjects in Mississippi under segregation during the 1940s-1950s. Crump, who was friends with Medgar Evers, was very involved in the Civil Rights movement and was a member of the NAACP along with his wife Clara. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 111 - [AFRICAN AMERICANA - COLORADO]. A group of items involving African American towns in Colorado, incl. Lincoln Hills brochure and photographs.

[AFRICAN AMERICANA - COLORADO]. A group of items involving African American towns in Colorado, incl. Lincoln Hills brochure and photographs. Lincoln Hills marketing brochure. Folio, 16 x 22 in. (heavily tattered, with creases, separations, taped repairs, loss, and chipping throughout). Denver, CO: Lincoln Hills, Inc., n.d. Ink inscribed "Zepha Grant" to lower right. Brochure describes Lincoln Hills as "A city of beauty, a place of refinement, a panorama of achievements and golden opportunities...A challenge to the ability, energy and ingenuity of all soon to be translated into action through our racial unity, civil pride and courage. A contribution to the Great State of Colorado with her fair laws that benefit all." A quotation from the eponymous Abraham Lincoln is featured below a picture index: "Having chosen our course without guile and with pure purpose, let us renew our trust in God and go forward without fear and with manly hearts." Brochure includes images of landscape views and structures on the development, a long list of people who have purchased lots, a map showing railroad and highway access, and a plot map showing the locations of individual lots and estates. Boasts "Easy Terms / $5 Down / $5 Per Month on $50 Contracts." 17 silver gelatin photographic copies of earlier photographs or documents related to the all-Black town and settlement of Dearfield, Colorado, founded by O.T. Jackson, ranging in size from approx. 5 x 5 in. to 5 x 7 in., including: 4 images of pages of a brochure about the town, 7 images featuring O.T. Jackson and/or his family members, one image of an unidentified resident farm, one image of the school house and church, and 4 others. Each with inscribed caption on verso. 5 silver gelatin snapshots of views at Dearfield including Dearfield Lake and two houses. Each with inscribed caption on verso and dated 1972. [With:] 5 photographs, including a cabinet card by the Pikes Peak Photographers, that are not identifiable to Lincoln Hills or Dearfield. Lincoln Hills was the brainchild of 3 white Denver entrepreneurs, who created Lincoln Hills, Inc. to build a summer development for middle class African Americans in Gilpin County, Colorado. They were likely inspired by the larger development of Idlewild, Michigan. Dearfield was established as a black majority settlement in Weld County, Colorado. Oliver Toussaint Jackson filed on the homestead that would become the town in 1910, advertising for "colonists" to make their homes there. The town ultimately fell victim to the Great Depression, and fell to a population of 12 by 1940. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 112 - GILBERT, Don, ed. Negro City Directory, 1947-1948. Dallas: Don Gilbert & T.W. Pratt; Dallas Negro Chamber of Commerce, 1947.

GILBERT, Don, ed. Negro City Directory, 1947-1948. Dallas: Don Gilbert & T.W. Pratt; Dallas Negro Chamber of Commerce, 1947. Large 4to (203 x 273 mm). Original red cloth with black titles (significant wear throughout including some separation to internal and external binding, dampstaining and some creasing/tearing to pages, and scuffing to covers). Gilbert compiled and published the directory and was also the editor of Applause magazine. The Directory features an illustrated guide of the city and highlights Dallas’s first black police officers, postal carriers, and others. A section of Dallas attorneys includes William J. Durham (1896-1970), a prominent leader in the civil rights movement who would try Sweatt v. Painter (1950) forcing the integration of the University of Texas School of Law. Illustrated throughout with advertisements of black-owned businesses as well as national brands including Budweiser and Borden's. The State Fair of Texas even advertises “Two Big Negro Achievement Days” and the white Texas League Dallas Rebels baseball team thank their “loyal Colored Fans who deserve the Best in Sports entertainment.” This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 113 - [AFRICAN AMERICANA - BUSINESS]. The Houston Negro Chamber of Commerce pamphlet. Ca 1951. [With:] 3 business cards representing Louis W. Dickerson's Houston, Texas, business enterprises.

[AFRICAN AMERICANA - BUSINESS]. The Houston Negro Chamber of Commerce pamphlet. Ca 1951. [With:] 3 business cards representing Louis W. Dickerson's Houston, Texas, business enterprises. Short pamphlet concerning the business and philanthropic activities as well as the membership of the Houston Negro Chamber of Commerce. Single leaf, 4pp, 7 x 3.75 folded (adhesive remnants on left and right sides of front page, toning). Circa 1951. [With:] A group of 3 business cards, comprising: "Club Matinee" card of Louis W. Dickerson; "Crystal Hotel" card identifying "L.W. Dickerson, Proprietor"; and card of "Madeline Wysingle / Club Matinee." Louis Wilton Dickerson (1903-ca 1970) was a businessman who operated multiple establishments in Houston's Fifth Ward - a neighborhood near downtown Houston that was traditionally populated by immigrants and African Americans. Located at 3300 Lyons Avenue in the Fifth Ward, "Club Matinee" was a legendary Houston nightspot, labeled "The Cotton Club of the South." The club opened in 1936 and offered segregated audiences some of the greatest musical talent of its time including Cab Calloway, Ray Charles, James Brown, Sam Cooke, Little Richard, B. B. King and more. In addition to Club Matinee, Dickerson operated (and depending on accounts, also owned) two hotels and a fleet of cabs as part of "Crystal Enterprises." The development of US. Interstate 10 essentially split the Fifth Ward neighborhood in the 1950s, and once profitable businesses began to shutter. Dickerson, once considered one of the wealthiest and most politically powerful Black man in the city, saw his empire and influence dwindle. In 1973, the enterprise that started it all, Club Matinee, closed. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 114 - [BUSINESS - MUSIC]. Black and Brown Stamp Album. San Francisco, CA: Black & Brown Trading Stamp Corporation, [1969]. Promoting black-owned businesses.

[BUSINESS - MUSIC]. Black and Brown Stamp Album. San Francisco, CA: Black & Brown Trading Stamp Corporation, [1969]. Promoting black-owned businesses. Original color pictorial wrappers, 48pp, 6 1/4 x 5 in. (wear to paper wraps and edges, light creasing, toning). Approx. 3 1/2 pages filled with 88 pasted in James Brown stamps. The Black and Brown Trading Stamp Corporation was founded by former pro football wide receiver Arthur "Art" Powell (1937-2015). His goal for establishing the corporation was to increase patronage to black owned businesses in downtown Oakland, California, and promote pride by featuring Black icons. The first and only icon featured on the stamps was James Brown, which reflects his direct support to help start the company. A full book of fifty pages was worth the equivalent of three dollars in merchandise at participating locations. Blank pages include promotional slogans for the project. By 1971, the stamps were being distributed in 10 cities across the country. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 115 - [OCCUPATIONAL]. National Surety Medal for Valor presented to African American police officer Leslie H. Carroll. New York: Tiffany & Co., 1943.

[OCCUPATIONAL]. National Surety Medal for Valor presented to African American police officer Leslie H. Carroll. New York: Tiffany & Co., 1943. 14k gold award medal, weight approx. 2.4 ounces, 2 in. on the diagonal, 1 1/2 in. square (very faint nicks and scratches). Obverse with "Police Department / City of New York" and departmental arms; reverse with "National Surety / Medal for Valor" encircling identification to "Leslie H. Carroll / 1943." Stamped "Tiffany & Co." and "14 kt. gold." Original blue ribbon, suspension, suspension ring, and brooch pin together measuring approx. 2 x 1 1/2 in. (ribbon with some light soil and wear). Tiffany medal presented to New York City rookie patrolman Leslie Holmes Carroll (1913-1989) for "conspicuous bravery" following an incident on 20 March 1943 during which a holdup suspect fired at the patrolman and Carroll returned fire killing the suspect. Carroll is identified in New York City newspaper reports as Shield 19,658 of the W. 135th St. station. He received the award in a Police Department ceremony on City Hall Plaza in June 1944. Carroll was mixed-race, born in Massachusetts to George Carroll and Nellie Carroll. He joined the New York City police force in 1942, and records show he was on the force at least through 1962. During the course of his career, Carroll received additional awards and commendations including the "Guardian Association Medal for Valor." By the 1970s Carroll had relocated to California and was serving as a pastor. He died in Sacramento in 1989 at the age of 75. Awards and citations for African American NYPD officers are rare in this era. Though the National Surety medal was awarded for at least 22 years (1935-1957), this is is the only example located, and may be the only example awarded to an African American officer. [With:] Photocopies of research and 6 x 4 in. blue velvet covered presentation box (wear, box not definitively original to the piece). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 116 - [OCCUPATIONAL]. Pullman Porter collection identified to Willie Leonard Sims (1910-1969), incl. uniform cap, ID card, documents, and photographs.

[OCCUPATIONAL]. Pullman Porter collection identified to Willie Leonard Sims (1910-1969), incl. uniform cap, ID card, documents, and photographs. A group of 9 items, including a Pullman porter cap, approx. 8 1/2 x 9 in. and 3 1/2 in. height, faded blue fabric with black visor and cords anchored at each end by a small "Pullman" button, badge at center above visor reads "Southern Sleeping Car Porter," interior sweat band present along with manufacturer's label for "Ruby's Uniform Caps" in Chicago. [With:] Card placard stating "This car is served by W.L. Sims"; Identification card issued to Sims by The Pullman Company on 8 June 1943; Commissary Circular No. 91, Chicago: The Pullman Company, 1946; 2 "Payroll Deduction and Earnings" statements; a State of Georgia Withholding Tax Statement; a 4 x 3 1/4 in. black and white snapshot of Sims along with two other African American Pullman employees; and a photograph of Sims, framed to 6 1/2 x 9 in. Provenance: From the estate of Nelly Sims, daughter of Willie L. Sims, native of Stockbridge, Georgia. Lot includes a typed personal statement from Sims's daughter describing his work as a Pullman porter. Willie Leonard "W.L." Sims started as Pullman porter at the age of 32, working as a "Southern Sleeping Car Porter" on the Southern Railway System from 1942-1964. Though African American men working as Pullman Porters often faced rampant discrimination, difficult working conditions, and received low pay, the position nonetheless still maintained an aura of prestige within the African American community. This was exemplified, in part, by the Porter's uniform, but came at a steep cost. An April 1915 government inquiry led by Chairman Frank P. Walsh of the Federal Industrial Commission found that porters were typically paid $27.50 a month wages, but were required to purchase their uniforms exclusively at Marshall Fields & Company at the cost of $24.50 whenever they needed a new uniform. Despite this, Sims's daughter's statement indicates that her father was "Proud to be a Pullman porter, [and] Proud to wear the cap that said 'Southern Sleeping Car Porter.'" This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 117 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Occupational CDV portrait of an African American individual, possibly a railway porter.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Occupational CDV portrait of an African American individual, possibly a railway porter. Uncredited, ca 1860s. 2 1/4 x 3 1/2 in. CDV on cardstock mount showing an African American male subject seated in a studio, wearing a suit and holding what appears to be a uniform cap (residue to margins of left and bottom margins of print and mount, small imperfection/crease near right edge of print and mount).

Lot: 118 - [OCCUPATIONAL]. KUEHNLE, Margaret Trigg, and CHANCE, Ruby Lee. Ruth. N.p., n.d., ca mid-19th century. Self-published tribute to housekeeper from Natchez, MS.

[OCCUPATIONAL]. KUEHNLE, Margaret Trigg, and CHANCE, Ruby Lee. Ruth. N.p., n.d., ca mid-19th century. Self-published tribute to housekeeper from Natchez, MS. 8vo (6 x 9 in.), paper wrappers (light soiling and creasing to wrappers, else very good). Written by two women from Natchez, MS, about an African American woman named Ruth who almost certainly worked for one or both of the authors. The book contains several writings referencing "Ruth" after her death. SCARCE: OCLC locates 8 institutional holdings. One of the authors, Margaret Trigg Kuehnle (1890-1990), lived to be 100 years old and is buried in Natchez, MS. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 119 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Sixth plate daguerreotype of a lovely African American woman. Ca 1850s.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Sixth plate daguerreotype of a lovely African American woman. Ca 1850s. Sixth plate seated portrait of an African American woman wearing gold-highlighted jewelry including dangle earrings. She is shown seated next to a stack of books. (Fading to image, scratching and wiping to plate, some tarnish to plate.) Housed in half leatherette case (general wear). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 120 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Sixth plate ruby ambrotype of a young African American male subject.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Sixth plate ruby ambrotype of a young African American male subject. Sixth plate seated portrait of a bearded African American man holding a wide-brimmed hat in his lap. (Some spotting and chemical discoloration to emulsion, with wear and chemical deterioration along edge; unsealed.) This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 121 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Sixth plate tintype portrait of a Black man wearing a large hat.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Sixth plate tintype portrait of a Black man wearing a large hat. Sixth plate tintype seated portrait of a bearded and grizzled Black man with what appear to be dreadlocks under his thick-brimmed hat. (Heavy loss and oxidation to significant portions of plate mostly covered by mat, other lesser surface scratches and imperfections throughout, subject remains rather clear; unsealed.) Housed under mat, glass, and preserver. Subject wears a worn jacket and gazes slightly upward and to the side, just off-camera. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 122 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Sixth plate tintype portrait of an African American man wearing Masonic attire.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Sixth plate tintype portrait of an African American man wearing Masonic attire. Sixth plate tintype full standing portrait of an African American Freemason. (Some loss to plate, with a few bends/creases, spots, and areas of discoloration/residue; unsealed.) Housed in a pressed paper case. Subject wears a lightly tinted sash and apron over his suit, and stands with his hand resting on the back rail of a chair beside him. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 123 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Tintype of African American mother and child.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Tintype of African American mother and child. 2 7/8 x 4 1/4 in. loose tintype (few light horizontal bends to plate, some surface scratches to plate incl. abrasion/scratch near child's mouth). A tender studio portrait of an African American woman holding her toddler-aged child in her lap. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 124 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Ninth plate tintype portrait featuring a young African American girl holding a white baby.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Ninth plate tintype portrait featuring a young African American girl holding a white baby. Ninth plate studio portrait of a young African American girl wearing a polka-dotted dress with puffed sleeves sitting in a chair and holding a white baby on her lap. The baby wears a long white dress. A studio pillar is visible to the viewer's left. (Surface mottling/chemical deterioration, 3 circular indentations to upper left portion of plate, corners clipped.) Housed in a Union case (loose hinge, chipping to edges). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 125 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Tintype of an African American couple in an outdoor setting.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Tintype of an African American couple in an outdoor setting. 2 5/8 x 3 1/2 in. loose tintype (few surface abrasions/scratches near top edge of plate). A portrait of a smartly-dressed couple seated in a beautiful outdoor setting. The gentleman is shown wearing a three-piece suit complete with a bowler-style hat and his companion wears a fancy dress with fingerless gloves. A small clutch rests on the woman's lap.

Lot: 126 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Tintype portrait of a young African American male subject.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Tintype portrait of a young African American male subject. 2 1/8 x 3 1/4 in. tintype portrait of a young male subject confidently seated in a studio setting, wearing a suit, with a small ribbon tied around his collar (significant bend to plate, light tarnish). Housed under 2 3/8 x 4 in. paper mount, with period seals holding the image in place on verso. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 127 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY - AFRICAN AMERICANA]. A group of 3 tintypes of African American subjects.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY - AFRICAN AMERICANA]. A group of 3 tintypes of African American subjects. Ninth plate tintype of an African American man standing in a studio wearing a hat and suit (few minor surface scratches). Housed in octagonal Union case with geometric design [Berg 3-40]. -- Ninth plate tintype of an African American woman. Housed in Union case, Harvest Motif [Berg 1-46]. -- 3/4 x 1 in. tintype of a young African American girl (some small scratches/nicks to surface). Housed in Union case with floral/scroll motif (not original to the image). -- Together, 3 tintype portraits of African American subjects. Condition overall good. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 128 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. BALL, James Presley (1825-1904), photographer. Sixth plate daguerreotype of two women. Cincinnati, Ohio.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. BALL, James Presley (1825-1904), photographer. Sixth plate daguerreotype of two women. Cincinnati, Ohio. Sixth plate seated portrait of two lovely young women, each wearing a brooch and long chain. (Tarnishing along edge, minor spotting to upper portion; resealed.) Housed in a full pressed paper case with girl scattering flowers motif on both covers (surface wear). Velvet pad marked for Ball. Portions of original seals present in case behind image. James Presley Ball (1825-1904) is one of the most renowned African American photographers, at one point owning the largest photographic gallery west of the Appalachians. When visiting White Sulphur Springs, Virginia in 1845 he met John B. Bailey, an African American Daguerreotypist from Boston where he acquired the passion and skill of photography. He opened a studio in Cincinnati later that year, and though it was unsuccessful, he continued his art with studios in Pittsburgh and Richmond and traveled as an itinerant Daguerreotypist. In 1849, he reopened a studio in Cincinnati. He hired his younger brother Thomas Ball to work as an operator, and in 1852 hired his future brother-in-law Alexander Thomas to work with him. By 1857, their gallery was one of the grandest in the United States attracting notables including Frederick Douglass. In 1887 Ball was chosen as the official photographer of a celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation held in Minneapolis-St. Paul. In 1888, he moved to Helena, Montana with his son where he operated a studio for several years before moving again in 1892 to Seattle. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 129 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. BALL, James Presley (1825-1904), photographer. 2 CDVS of male and female subjects. Cincinnati, Ohio.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. BALL, James Presley (1825-1904), photographer. 2 CDVS of male and female subjects. Cincinnati, Ohio. 2 1/8 x 3 1/2 in. CDV on cardstock mount featuring a vignetted portrait of a woman, which may be a cropped view that previously included another subject as indicated by what looks like a shoulder to the left of the woman (surface wear/abrasion left of woman's face, few spots, light soiling. Verso with imprint of J.P. Ball's Photographic Gallery, No. 30 West 4th Street, Cincinnati, Ohio, and 3-cent Internal Revenue Proprietary stamp initialed "J.P.B.," possibly written in the hand of J.P. Ball, although this cannot be confirmed. -- 2 1/4 x 3 1/2 in. CDV on cardstock mount, showing a young man standing in a studio wearing a loose-fitting jacket and pants, with a hat in hand (soiling to print and mount, trimmed edges). Verso with imprint of Ball & Thomas Photographic Art Gallery, 120 W. 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, and 2-cent Internal Revenue Proprietary stamp which appears to be initialed "B & T," presumably representing "Ball & Thomas." -- Together, 2 CDVs. James Presley Ball (1825-1904) is one of the most renowned African American photographers, at one point owning the largest photographic gallery west of the Appalachians. When visiting White Sulphur Springs, Virginia in 1845 he met John B. Bailey, an African American Daguerreotypist from Boston where he acquired the passion and skill of photography. He opened a studio in Cincinnati later that year, and though it was unsuccessful, he continued his art with studios in Pittsburgh and Richmond and traveled as an itinerant Daguerreotypist. In 1849, he reopened a studio in Cincinnati. He hired his younger brother Thomas Ball to work as an operator, and in 1852 hired his future brother-in-law Alexander Thomas to work with him. By 1857, their gallery was one of the grandest in the United States attracting notables including Frederick Douglass. In 1887 Ball was chosen as the official photographer of a celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation held in Minneapolis-St. Paul. In 1888, he moved to Helena, Montana with his son where he operated a studio for several years before moving again in 1892 to Seattle.

Lot: 130 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. CDV of a young African American woman identified as a servant aboard the USS Neptune. New York: J.B. Gardner, ca 1865-1866.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. CDV of a young African American woman identified as a servant aboard the USS Neptune. New York: J.B. Gardner, ca 1865-1866. 2 1/8 x 3 5/8 in. CDV on cardstock mount (toning, some soiling, edge wear to mount). Seated portrait of an African American woman wearing a bonnet and patterned dress, seated against a simple studio backdrop. Penciled notation on verso identifies the subject as, "Mary Nash servant on board Steamship Neptune 1865." Verso with Gardner's studio imprint and 2-cent US Internal Revenue stamp, which appears to be initialed and dated "J.B.G. / 1866." The USS Neptune was a steam vessel taken up from the civilian trade and converted to a gunboat. Neptune was employed on the West Indies Station from January 1864 until it was decommissioned in May 1865.

Lot: 131 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. CDV of Rev. Josiah Henson, the "Original 'Uncle Tom.'" Philadelphia, PA: E.H. Hart.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. CDV of Rev. Josiah Henson, the "Original 'Uncle Tom.'" Philadelphia, PA: E.H. Hart. 2 1/4 x 3 1/2 in. CDV on cardstock mount (toning, soiling, some edge wear to print and mount). Mount recto with imprint in lower margin, "The Original 'Uncle Tom.' [Rev. Josiah Henson]." Mount verso with photographer's imprint and biographical information about Henson. Born into slavery in Maryland, Josiah Henson (1789-1883) was barely five when he was sold after his first master’s death, ending up eventually on the plantation of Isaac Riley, along with his mother. A convert to Christianity at 18, Henson acted as a lay Methodist preacher and saved up funds to purchase his freedom, but nothing was to come easy for him. Facing financial straits in 1825, Riley transferred Henson to his brother Amos in Kentucky, who according to Henson’s autobiography, accepted Henson’s saving as the price for freedom in 1829, but then reneged on the exchange. After finding that Riley was shipping him to New Orleans to be sold - a plan fortuitously delayed - Henson decided to escape. In 1830, he, his wife and four children crossed the Ohio River through Indiana and Ohio, via Buffalo, into freedom in Canada. There Henson established a settlement for self-liberated enslaved people called New Dawn in 1834 and became a prominent member of the Black community in Canada, becoming known internationally as an abolitionist and preacher. His 1849 autobiography and encounter with Harriet Beecher Stowe led to his becoming the model for Uncle Tom in the best-selling antislavery novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Lot: 132 - [JASPER, John. (1812 - 1901)]. Cabinet card of formerly enslaved Reverend John Jasper. New York, NY: Anderson.

[JASPER, John. (1812 - 1901)]. Cabinet card of formerly enslaved Reverend John Jasper. New York, NY: Anderson. 4 x 5 7/8 in. cabinet photograph on cardstock mount (indentation at each corner of mount/print, occasional soiling). Mount recto with photographer's imprint and period identification with quote, "The Rev. Mr. Jasper, 'The Sun do move.'" John Jasper was born in enslavement in Fluvanna County, VA, on 4 July 1812. His father, Philip Jasper, had been a Baptist preacher, but John, the youngest of 24 children, was born 2 months after his father died and so did not benefit from his father's example. Attitudes toward Christianizing enslaved people were mixed in the antebellum South. Some feared the enslaved people would take Biblical lessons, such as the Exodus, to heart. Those who viewed them as "beasts of the field" did not see the need to convert them. As the tensions over slavery increased, large-scale efforts at conversion were undertaken, some in recognition of the enslaved peoples' humanity, others to attend to their "needs," and thus demonstrate that they were being "humanely" treated. John was converted in 1839 and began preaching shortly thereafter. By 1844 he became known for his funeral orations, and was in great demand throughout the region. Those hiring him paid his owner for the loss of his time at home. By the end of the Civil War, Jasper was reaching the peak of his career. To accommodate those wanting to hear him preach, he founded the Sixth Mount Zion Baptist Church in 1867. His widest recognition came with his "Sun Do Move" sermon in 1874, which he gave over 250 times, once to the state General Assembly. Jasper taught himself to read and write and was perfectly literate, but always preached in the dialect of the southern enslaved person, his primary audience. It is reported that some white southerners came to hear him preach to ridicule his speech patterns, but many more seem to have recognized the power of his message in any language. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 133 - [JASPER, John. (1812 - 1901)]. Photograph of formerly enslaved Reverend John Jasper. N.p., n.d., ca 1870s.

[JASPER, John. (1812 - 1901)]. Photograph of formerly enslaved Reverend John Jasper. N.p., n.d., ca 1870s. 5 1/2 x 8 1/4 in. albumen photo mounted on a 7 3/4 x 9 3/4 in. cardstock mount (toning, some soiling, and retouched areas of print, some surface residue on lower margin of print; soiling, chipping areas of loss to mount). A view of John Jasper seated in a studio, holding his hat in one hand and a cane in the other. John Jasper was born in enslavement in Fluvanna County, VA, on 4 July 1812. His father, Philip Jasper, had been a Baptist preacher, but John, the youngest of 24 children, was born 2 months after his father died and so did not benefit from his father's example. Attitudes toward Christianizing enslaved people were mixed in the antebellum South. Some feared the enslaved people would take Biblical lessons, such as the Exodus, to heart. Those who viewed them as "beasts of the field" did not see the need to convert them. As the tensions over slavery increased, large-scale efforts at conversion were undertaken, some in recognition of the humanity of the enslaved, others to attend to their "needs," and thus demonstrate that the enslaved were being "humanely" treated. John was converted in 1839 and began preaching shortly thereafter. By 1844 he became known for his funeral orations, and was in great demand throughout the region. Those hiring him paid his owner for the loss of his time at home. By the end of the Civil War, Jasper was reaching the peak of his career. To accommodate those wanting to hear him preach, he founded the Sixth Mount Zion Baptist Church in 1867. His widest recognition came with his "Sun Do Move" sermon in 1874, which he gave over 250 times, once to the state General Assembly. Jasper taught himself to read and write and was perfectly literate, but always preached in the dialect of the southern enslaved, his primary audience. It is reported that some white southerners came to hear him preach to ridicule his speech patterns, but many more seem to have recognized the power of his message in any language.

Lot: 134 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. 2 cabinet cards of African American subjects by African American photographers James Conway FARLEY and Otis G. FIELDS.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. 2 cabinet cards of African American subjects by African American photographers James Conway FARLEY and Otis G. FIELDS. Cabinet card of an African American gentleman. Richmond, VA: Jefferson Fine Art Gallery, operated by James Conway Farley, ca 1895-1906. 3 7/8 x 5 1/2 in. cabinet photograph on cardstock mount (significant toning, few ink marks affecting portrait, wear to mount edges and corners including loss to lower left). Jefferson Gallery imprint on mount recto. Standing portrait of a bearded man wearing a suit and watch chain resting his hand on a wicker chair next to him. James Conway Farley (1854-ca 1910) was born to enslaved parents in Prince Edward County, Virginia, from which he eventually moved to Richmond with his mother around 1861. He learned about photography by working in the chemical department at C.R. Rees's company, and from there went to work as an operator at G.W. Davis Photography Gallery, where he stayed for twenty years. He finally opened his own studio in 1895, and both black and white patrons utilized his services. He is listed as being at 523 East Broad Street through 1906, and at 627 East Broad Street in 1907 and 1908. Farley appears as a working photographer in Jersey City in a 1910 census, but this is the last record of him. His work was widely celebrated and showcased at various exhibitions including the World Industry and Cotton Centennial Exposition in New Orleans. [With:] Cabinet card of a mother and her two young daughters. Toledo, OH: Otis G. Fields, ca 1890. 3 7/8 x 5 1/2 in. cabinet photograph on cardstock mount (toning, soiling throughout, wear with some paper loss to bottom edge; wear to mount edges and corners). Fields' blindstamp to mount recto. Vignetted portrait of a mother with her two young daughters. Otis G. Fields (b. 1862), the son of another pioneering African American photographer, George B. Fields, worked with his father from 1882-1885, and had his own studio at 419 Summit St. by 1888. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 135 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. CDV of a large group of African Americans. Philadelphia, PA: Trask & Bacon, n.d.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. CDV of a large group of African Americans. Philadelphia, PA: Trask & Bacon, n.d. 3 3/4 x 2 1/4 in. CDV on cardstock mount (light toning, minimal soiling, some edge wear to mount). A studio view of a group of 15 African American subjects, both male and female, of varying ages. Consignor relates that the CDV was found in a Philadelphia Quaker family album.

Lot: 136 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. A large collection of assorted photographs of African American vernacular subjects.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. A large collection of assorted photographs of African American vernacular subjects. 43 photographs, ca late 19th to mid-20th century, many mounted on cardstock, with sizes varying from 2 1/2 x 4 in. to 12 x 9 5/8 in. Includes CDVs, cabinet cards, real photo postcards, and mounted and unmounted silver gelatin photographs. Conditions vary but generally fair. Highlights include a cabinet card featuring a Black woman dressed as a maid holding a white baby on her lap. Richmond, VA: Campbell & Co., n.d. -- 3 CDVs of lovely and well-dressed young Black women, credited to photographers in Battle Creek, MI, Grand Rapids, MI, and Philadelphia. -- CDV of a striking young Black man posed in a studio with a painted backdrop. Barry, IL: E. R. Burnham, n.d. -- Large format mounted photograph of a large group of farm workers out in a field with numerous tall wooden baskets placed every so often among the crop rows. N.p., n.d. -- Cabinet card of a young Black woman wearing an interesting outfit including polka-dotted dress, very thin hat, and beaded choker, and holding an umbrella. Weatherford, TX: D. Whittaker, n.d. -- Cabinet card of a young Black family including a father, mother, and their 4 baby-to-toddler-aged children. Reading, PA: Strunk. -- Real photo postcard featuring an older Black man posed with books, a large brass horn, and a large sign that reads, "Love with Patience - A - 4 Act Religeous [sic] Drama." -- Real photo postcard featuring a profile portrait of W. E. B. DuBois. Boston, MA: West Moreland Co., ca 1900s. -- Real photo postcard of a Black woman holding a white baby on her lap in a studio. N.p., n.d. -- And many more. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 137 - [MUSIC - WIGGINS, Thomas Greene "Blind Tom" (1849-1908)]. WARREN, George Kendall (1824-1884), photographer. Cabinet card of Blind Tom.

[MUSIC - WIGGINS, Thomas Greene "Blind Tom" (1849-1908)]. WARREN, George Kendall (1824-1884), photographer. Cabinet card of Blind Tom. 4 x 5 3/4 in. cabinet card on cardstock mount (indentation at each corner of mount/print, occasional spotting and lighting). Period identification on mount below image. Verso with photographer's imprint. The story of Thomas “Blind Tom” Wiggins

Lot: 138 - [MUSIC] -- [McKOY, Millie and Christine (1851-1912)]. HUGHES & Co., photographers. CDV of the famous conjoined twins from North Carolina. St. Louis, ca 1860s.

[MUSIC] -- [McKOY, Millie and Christine (1851-1912)]. HUGHES & Co., photographers. CDV of the famous conjoined twins from North Carolina. St. Louis, ca 1860s. CDV studio portrait on cardstock mount (light toning, minor spotting and wear to print edges, some wear and discoloration to mount edges and corners). Credited verso. The twins stand, wearing a dress with applied crescent moons along the hem. [With:] 8 1/8 x 10 3/4 in. printed sheet, likely removed from a stable-bound booklet (staple holes to left edge, creasing, spotting). A halftone image of the twins as grown women makes up the top half of the page, while text below (and continuing onto verso) provides the "History of Miss Mille-Christine." Page numbers 77 and 78 appear at bottom of recto and verso. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 139 - [MUSIC - EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Two photographs of African American conjoined twins Millie-Christine.

[MUSIC - EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Two photographs of African American conjoined twins Millie-Christine. CDV, studio view of Millie-Christine, with a guitar at their side. Philadelphia, PA: W.L. Germon's Temple of Art, n.d., ca 1870s. 2 3/8 x 3 5/8 in. CDV on cardstock mount (toning, soiling, small surface abrasion to print). Photographer's imprint and lightly penciled identification on verso. -- Cabinet card, studio portrait of Millie-Christine. Boonton, NJ: Wendt, n.d., ca 1890s. 3 7/8 x 5 1/2 in. cabinet photograph on cardstock mount (light toning, spotting/soiling to print and mount, edge wear to mount). Photographer's imprint on mount recto and period identification on verso. Born into enslavement on a plantation in southeastern North Carolina, the conjoined twins were sold several times while children and abducted twice by people looking to exploit them. Eventually, they came to be enslaved by Joseph Smith who toured the sisters through the United States, Canada, and Europe. They were freed by the Emancipation Proclamation and continued to tour internationally. The talented singers were successful enough to purchase the property where they were born and build a grand home where they lived until their death. In early October 1912, Millie died after contracting tuberculosis. Christine was unable to be safely separated and died the next day. Though they had separate personalities, they were often referred to with one name, "Millie-Christine" and are themselves quoted as saying, "Although we speak of ourselves in the plural, we feel as but one person."

Lot: 140 - [MUSIC - McKOY, Millie and Christine (1851-1912)]. Printed card advertising performances by the "Carolina Twins" Millie and Christine.

[MUSIC - McKOY, Millie and Christine (1851-1912)]. Printed card advertising performances by the "Carolina Twins" Millie and Christine. 2 3/4 x 5 1/2 in. advertisement printed on thin cardstock (toning, otherwise near excellent). Obverse features depictions of the conjoined twins performing acts from their show. Reverse with heading, "Don't Fail to See Millie Christine. A Famous Woman," with accompanying details about Millie Christine. Born into enslavement on a plantation in southeastern North Carolina, the conjoined twins were sold several times while children and abducted twice by people looking to exploit them. Eventually, they came to be enslaved by Joseph Smith who toured the sisters through the United States, Canada, and Europe. They were freed by the Emancipation Proclamation and continued to tour internationally. The talented singers were successful enough to purchase the property where they were born and build a grand home where they lived until their death. In early October 1912, Millie died after contracting tuberculosis. Christine was unable to be safely separated and died the next day. Though they had separate personalities, they were often referred to with one name, "Millie-Christine" and are themselves quoted as saying, "Although we speak of ourselves in the plural, we feel as but one person." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 141 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Real photo postcards and Photographs of Predominantly African American circus performers.

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Real photo postcards and Photographs of Predominantly African American circus performers. Cabinet card featuring "Twin White Moors" William and Lizzie Cavaliers. Chicago: Fred D. Maisch, n.d. Verso bears printed description of the performers: "The only Twin White Moors on Exhibition before the American Public that we have any knowledge of; Ages 19 years; now traveling with Ringling Bros.' World's Greatest Shows." -- Photo postcard featuring Ella Williams, whose stage name was "Abomah, the Tallest Lady in the World." Preston: Arthur Winter Photo, n.d. -- Postally used photo postcard of George Forster, the "Negro Actor-Vocalist." N.p., n.d. The featured photo collage is made up of 5 portraits of Forster from various scenes in "The Old Slave." -- 3 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. printed photograph of "Deacon James Finch / Ht. 7 ft. / Wt. 650 Lbs." N.p., n.d. Finch's name, height and weight are written in the negative. -- And 4 snapshots, 2 of which feature Ella Williams in swimming garments. -- Together, 8 images of performers. Conditions vary, though largely fair, with light toning and surface wear present in most. [With:] 4 3/8 x 5 7/8 in. partial newspaper clipping (significant loss, chipping) promoting the Dixie Land exhibition in Northern Indiana presented by Otis Vore. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 142 - [PHOTOGRAPHY]. VAN VECHTEN, Carl (1880-1964), photographer. Portrait of Cab Calloway. 1933.

[PHOTOGRAPHY]. VAN VECHTEN, Carl (1880-1964), photographer. Portrait of Cab Calloway. 1933. 6 5/8 x 9 in. silver gelatin photograph (some edge and corner wear). Verso with manuscript credit, "Photograph by Carl Van Vechten, XIX b:24, January 12 1933." One of a number of photographs by Van Vechten capturing the exuberance of Cab Calloway (1907-1994), legendary bandleader, singer, and all-around entertainer of the swing era. Carl Van Vechten was well-connected to the people and places of the Harlem Renaissance at a time when racial segregation and Jim Crow laws were intense. Throughout the 1920s, he indulged in the parties and social scene of New York's Black creative class, which he captured in his provocatively titled novel Nigger Heaven. When the Depression came, he stopped writing novels and began taking photographs, most notably of influential African Americans, taking iconic portraits of thought leaders, entertainment stars, sports figures, artists, writers of the Harlem Renaissance, and more. His collection of over 9000 images, mostly portraits, is held at the Beinecke Library at Yale University. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 143 - [PHOTOGRAPHY]. VAN VECHTEN, Carl (1880-1964), photographer. Portrait of composer William Grant Still Jr. (1895-1978).

[PHOTOGRAPHY]. VAN VECHTEN, Carl (1880-1964), photographer. Portrait of composer William Grant Still Jr. (1895-1978). 7 3/8 x 9 9/16 in. silver gelatin photograph (some edge and corner wear, bit of silvering to lower portion). Credited to Van Vechten on recto (blindstamp) and verso (ink stamp) with verso inscription: "William grant Still / March 12 1949 / I gg 11." Carl Van Vechten was well-connected to the people and places of the Harlem Renaissance at a time when racial segregation and Jim Crow laws were intense. Throughout the 1920s, he indulged in the parties and social scene of New York's Black creative class, which he captured in his provocatively titled novel Nigger Heaven. When the Depression came, he stopped writing novels and began taking photographs, most notably of influential African Americans, taking iconic portraits of thought leaders, entertainment stars, sports figures, artists, writers of the Harlem Renaissance, and more. His collection of over 9000 images, mostly portraits, is held at the Beinecke Library at Yale University. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 144 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Ebony Boys. New York, NY: G.G.G. Photo Studio, 1933, operated by noted Harlem photographer James VANDERZEE (1886-1983).

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Ebony Boys. New York, NY: G.G.G. Photo Studio, 1933, operated by noted Harlem photographer James VANDERZEE (1886-1983). 7 x 9 in. silver gelatin photograph (light toning, few minor spots, some edge wear). Signed and dated in negative at lower right corner, "1933, VanDerZee, N.Y.C." Verso with "G.G.G. Photo Studio, 2077-7th Ave., N.Y.C." ink stamp. Inscribed lower right in ink, "To Mrs. Ross From 3 Ebony Boys." James VanDerZee was best known for his photographs of African American New Yorkers. He began his career as a darkroom assistant in 1915, but opened his own studio in Harlem the following year. Throughout World War I, his business blossomed, and following the war, he produced hundreds of portraits of Harlem's expanding middle class population. Some of VanDerZee's more famous subjects include Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, Joe Louis, Florence Mills, Countee Cullen, and Marcus Garvey. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 145 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Church Group, 1938. New York, NY: G.G.G. Photo Studio, operated by noted Harlem photographer James VANDERZEE (1886-1983).

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY]. Church Group, 1938. New York, NY: G.G.G. Photo Studio, operated by noted Harlem photographer James VANDERZEE (1886-1983). 8 x 10 in. (including margins) unmounted silver gelatin photograph (wear to edges and corners, including creasing to each corner). Signed and dated in negative at lower right corner, "VanDerZee, 1938." Verso with 3 "G.G.G. Photo Studio, 2077-7th Ave., N.Y.C." ink stamps, and penciled number "5223." James VanDerZee was best known for his photographs of African American New Yorkers. He began his career as a darkroom assistant in 1915, but opened his own studio in Harlem the following year. Throughout World War I, his business blossomed, and following the war, he produced hundreds of portraits of Harlem's expanding middle class population. Some of VanDerZee's more famous subjects include Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, Joe Louis, Florence Mills, Countee Cullen, and Marcus Garvey. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 146 - SISKIND, Aaron (1903-1991). Boy, from "Harlem Document," ca 1935. Printed ca 1959.

SISKIND, Aaron (1903-1991). Boy, from "Harlem Document," ca 1935. Printed ca 1959. 7 x 4 3/4 in. silver gelatin photograph, 14 x 11 in. mount, signed, dated "Xmas 1959" and "Greetings!" in ink in the margin. This lot is located in Chicago.

Lot: 147 - [MUSIC]. JONES, Paul T., photographer. Billie Holiday performing at the Bambola in Pittsburgh, PA. Ca 1947.

[MUSIC]. JONES, Paul T., photographer. Billie Holiday performing at the Bambola in Pittsburgh, PA. Ca 1947. 8 x 10 in. (including margins) silver gelatin photograph (some creasing throughout, toning). Signed and inscribed on image in an unknown hand: "Best of Luck Joe & Betty / Resia[?] / 2/11/48." Stamped "Photo by Paul T. Jones" on image and verso. Billie Holiday is captured mid-performance as she stands before a microphone wearing flowers in her hair and a long, gauzy black dress. A few musicians are visible behind her, including Tommy Turrentine on muted trumped and Cecil Brooks II on drums, along with a few crowd members and part of the awning above reading "Bambola." The Bambola social club was a venue integral in Pittsburgh's Black entertainment scene in the 1940s. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 148 - [EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY - MUSIC]. WILLIAMS, Ted (1925-2009), photographer. Sarah Vaughn, Backstage / Chicago theater 1949 (printed later).

[EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY - MUSIC]. WILLIAMS, Ted (1925-2009), photographer. Sarah Vaughn, Backstage / Chicago theater 1949 (printed later). 9 1/4 x 7 1/4 in. silver gelatin photograph affixed with tape on verso to 14 x 11 in. mat (print in excellent condition). Lower margin of mount titled and signed by Ted Williams. A later printing of a portrait taken during Sarah Vaughn's first national tour as a solo artist. She is shown spraying perfume at her dressing table. Williams was well known in the jazz scene and his portraits are highly-regarded for their ability to capture the musicians while playing. In an excerpt from Jazz: The Iconic Images of Ted Williams, the photographer says the following about the image offered here: "I was a student at The Institute of Design at the time, and called Sarah directly at her hotel (possible in those days) and received permission to photograph her in her dressing room for the next issue of a non-existent college newspaper. Dave Garroway (the first Today show host) was a well-known Chicago disc jockey then and 'Sassy's' biggest and most vocal fan. When she came onstage, David preceded her scattering rose petals for her to walk on. This got a lot of press locally and did not resonate too well with a few bigots that took notice. About mid-week, a group sat in the front row and waited for Sarah to start singing, and proceeded to throw tomatoes at her. This photo was taken a few days before that notorious incident." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 149 - [EARY PHOTOGRAPHY] -- [MUSIC]. WIGGINS, Eddy (1904-1989?), photographer. A group of 5 photographs of jazz musicians and vocalists taken by African American photographer Eddy Wiggins. Paris, France. Ca mid-20th century.

[EARY PHOTOGRAPHY] -- [MUSIC]. WIGGINS, Eddy (1904-1989?), photographer. A group of 5 photographs of jazz musicians and vocalists taken by African American photographer Eddy Wiggins. Paris, France. Ca mid-20th century. Two (2) 10 3/4 x 8 1/2 in. silver gelatin photographs and three (3) 9 1/2 x 7 in. silver gelatin photographs (some edgewear, slight abrasions). Ink inscriptions identifying subjects on verso of three images. Two images with handwritten attribution to "E.H. Wiggins / Paris" and another with "photo d' Eddy Wiggins." Subjects include Louis Armstrong (1901-1971), Jimmy Rushing (1901-1972), Guy Lafitte (1927-1998), Ray Charles (1930-2004), Leroy Cooper (1928-2009), and Ella Fitzgerald (1917-1996). The life and career of African American photographer Eddy Wiggins remains little explored despite the fact that he used his lens to document some of the most famous African American musicians and vocalists of the twentieth century. According to records of the Bibliotheque Nationale de France, Wiggins was born in New Orleans in 1904 (other sources cite his birth in Mississippi). French author Gilles LeRoy's 2008 book Eddy Wiggins. Le Noir et le Blanc. provides some biographical background, indicating that Wiggins moved from New Orleans to Chicago as a young man hoping to escape the violence and racism of the south. He left Chicago in 1933 moving to Paris as a correspondent for the prominent African American newspaper The Chicago Defender. He then covered the Parisian jazz scene for the newly founded French jazz magazine Jazz Hot. Following World War II, he served as a photographer and jazz correspondent for several American magazines, working with some of the greatest artists of the time. His photographs depict the lives of legendary African American artists in Paris, including candid moments backstage in concert halls such as Paris's famed concert venue, L'Olympia. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 150 - [ENTERTAINMENT - MUSIC]. Jim Crow, the American Mountebank performing at the Grand Theatre. London: S.W. Fores, ca 1830s. [With:] The Old Folks at Home. Illustrated sheet music.

[ENTERTAINMENT - MUSIC]. Jim Crow, the American Mountebank performing at the Grand Theatre. London: S.W. Fores, ca 1830s. [With:] The Old Folks at Home. Illustrated sheet music. Jim Crow, the American Mountebank performing at the Grand Theatre. London: S.W. Fores, ca 1830s. 10 x 13 1/2 in. lithograph (light soiling, verso with residue near corners, slightly trimmed along top edge). The lithograph depicts Thomas Rice wearing the costume of his character "Jim Crow," with his right arm raised and skipping a small dance step. The depiction is the same as that featured on a songsheet showing Rice as he performed at the Surrey Theatre in Southwark ca 1836-1837. British figures are shown in the background watching Rice perform, including the subject at far left who is believed to be John Scott, 1st Earl of Eldon. Considered the "father of American minstrelsy," Thomas Dartmouth "Daddy" Rice (1808-1860) began his career as a traveling actor, creating his signature act of Jim Crow in 1832. His performances were typically part of a variety show or included between acts in a play. Rice's act included the song and dance "Jump Jim Crow," which would later lend its name to the "Jim Crow Laws" used by southern legislatures at the end of the 19th century. [With:] The Old Folks at Home, Song and Chorus. London: Davidson, Peter's Hill, Doctors' Commons, South of St. Paul's, n.d. 4pp., 9 3/4 x 13 1/2 in. sheet music. Disbound and including music only for "The Old Folks at Home" (toned, chips and repaired tears to edges). Sheet music featuring cover illustration of an African American male subject. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 151 - [MUSIC]. A group of 4 musical publications, incl.

[MUSIC]. A group of 4 musical publications, incl. The Lover's Forget-Me-Not, and Songs of Beauty...with all the Late Negro Melodies (1845), Jubilee Songs and Plantation Melodies (1884), and an early publication of “When The Saints Are Marching In,” in Songs of the Soul (1897). The Lover's Forget-Me-Not, and songs of Beauty: A Choice Collection of Sentimental, Comic, and Temperance Songs, with all the late Negro Melodies. Philadelphia: John B. Perry, 1845. 48mo (3 x 4 1/2 in.), containing numerous woodcuts (soiling, wear to interior, few inked notations, lacking pages 127/8 and 229/30). Bound in leather (significant surface wear, some edge and corner loss). SCARCE: WorldCat locates one institutional holding of this edition. [With:] Jubilee Songs and Plantation Melodies. (Words and Music,) Specially Arranged by Prof. J.J. Sawyer, and Sung by The Original Nashville Students, the Celebrated Concert Company. Chicago: H.B. Thearle, 1884. 8vo. Music and lyrics for 15 songs. (Toned pages, very occasional small tear at edge). Original publisher's chromolithographic wrappers (front wrapper and first page detached, corner and edge loss to wrappers and interior pages, chipping, short tears). The group of 8 or 9 singers was formed in Chicago in about 1882 and toured widely until at least 1890. [With:] BLACK, James Milton (1856-1938), editor. Songs of the Soul No. 2. For Use In......Sunda Evening Congregations, Revivals, Camp-Meetings, Social Services and Young People's Meetings. Cincinnati, OH, et al. and New York et al: Curts & Jennings and Eaton & Mains, 1897. 8vo. Hymnal music. (Toned.) Original illustrated boards (scuffing, toned). FIRST EDITION, second (?) printing with early publication of "When the Saints are Marching In" as hymn No. 59 on p. 59. With lyrics by Katharine E. PURVIS (1843-1907) and music by James Milton BLACK who also edited the hymnal. While this version does differ from the jazz standard, James Fuld regards this as the first known publication of the Black spiritual with "words and music quite similar to those in present form". The more recognizable version did not appear until 1927. Only one other copy of the first edition was located, held at Western Kentucky University with both the cover and title page bearing 1896. The copy here bears the copyright date of 1896 on the cover and on the music, however, 1897 is printed on the title page. RARE: OCLC locates only 1 copy held at Western Kentucky University, no other copies of the 1897 printing were located at the time of cataloging. [Also with:] BOATNER, Edward, editor. Spirituals Triumphant Old and New. Nashville, TN: Sunday School Publishing Board, copyright 1927. 8vo. Hymnal music. Original wrappers. Cover notes that it is "Revised and Enlarged", and appears to be a modern facsimile copy. Together, 4 items. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 152 - [MUSIC]. The Swallows and All Star Dance Orchestra. Gregory's Ballroom, Richmond, VA. Baltimore, MD: Globe Poster Corps, [1953].

[MUSIC]. The Swallows and All Star Dance Orchestra. Gregory's Ballroom, Richmond, VA. Baltimore, MD: Globe Poster Corps, [1953]. 22 x 28 1/2 in. poster/window card on thin cardstock (dampstaining to top margin, few punctures and 2 in. loss to bottom edge, small holes to top and bottom margins). Boxing-style poster promoting a performance by The Swallows, featuring an image of the Baltimore Doo-Wop group and "King Recording Stars" as well as some of their hits, including "Beside You," "Laugh," and "Bicycle Tillie." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 153 - [ROBESON, PAUL (1898-1976)]. A group of 14 items mostly related to Robeson's career as a performer.

[ROBESON, PAUL (1898-1976)]. A group of 14 items mostly related to Robeson's career as a performer. 6 1/4 x 9 1/4 in. handbill announcing a solo performance by Paul Robeson as part of a "Negro Song Jubilee" at the County Center in White Plains on 16 April 1931. [New York]: n.p., [1931]. Upper portion of handbill features bold text reading, "Old Spirituals in a Modern Setting." -- 6 1/4 x 9 3/8

Lot: 154 - [BAKER, Josephine (1906-1975)]. A pair of programs for the Folies Bergère featuring Josephine Baker, 1926 and 1937.

[BAKER, Josephine (1906-1975)]. A pair of programs for the Folies Bergère featuring Josephine Baker, 1926 and 1937. La Revue des Folies Bergère...1926-1927. Paris: Editions Artistiques de Paris, 1926. 9 3/8 x 12 1/8 in. Original gilt pictorial wrappers with glassine jacket, featuring a color portrait of a topless Josephine Baker on the title page and richly illustrated (overall very good, minor wear). -- Folies Bergère 1937 en Super-Folies. Paris: n.p., 1937. 9 1/2 x 12 1/8 in. Original gilt pictorial wrappers with glassine jacket, featuring color reproduction of a nude painting of Josephine Baker tipped to first page, richly illustrated (overall very good, minor wear). Accompanied by insert from Deauville "La Plage Fleurie", 4pp, 9 x 11 1/2 in. (overall very good). Interior with color spread promoting "La Jungle Marveilleuse avec Josephine Baker." -- Together, 2 programs from the Folies Bergère, the famed French cabaret hall where Josephine Baker got her first big break in her career. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 155 - [MUSIC] -- [DE PAUR, Leonard (1914-1998)]. Concert program from the 5th Annual Tour of de Paur's Infantry Chorus. Spring 1951.

[MUSIC] -- [DE PAUR, Leonard (1914-1998)]. Concert program from the 5th Annual Tour of de Paur's Infantry Chorus. Spring 1951. "Tour of South American and the Caribbean / Spring 1951." 24pp, 9 x 12 in. (light wear, toning, mild dampstaining to cover). Program includes an introduction to the chorus, biographies of de Paur and the soloists, and a full concert listing. Illustrated with more than 30 photographs. [With:] Program, "The Community Concert Association Presents de Paur's Infantry Chorus." 1951-1952. 4pp, 6 1/4 x 9 1/2 in. (light soil, faints creases). Includes a full listing of songs in the program as well as a brief background on de Paur and the Infantry Chorus. Leonard de Paur was a prominent African American musician, composer, and choral director best known for conducting the de Paur Infantry Chorus, a part of the 372nd Infantry Regiment. The chorus, a group of thirty-five African American veterans, had its roots in World War II during which time the chorus was created to sing for American troops. During their three years of travel, the chorus gave more than 2000 concerts for the American armed forces, visiting every theater of the war. De Paur had already achieved a level of national acclaim as a conductor prior to enlisting in the United States Army Air Forces in 1942, but post-war his career and fame exploded as the de Paur Infantry Chorus embarked upon transcontinental tours and became the top performing group at Columbia Masterworks Records. De Paur disbanded the Infantry Chorus in 1957, though in later years he formed a new choral group and embarked upon a lengthy career with the Lincoln Center. A scarce program from a famed African American chorus group. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 156 - [MUSIC]. The Biggest Rhythm & Blues Show of '55. Concert poster promoting performances by The Drifters, Roy Hamilton, and Laverne Baker at the Memorial Auditorium, Chattanooga, TN. 27 May 1955.

[MUSIC]. The Biggest Rhythm & Blues Show of '55. Concert poster promoting performances by The Drifters, Roy Hamilton, and Laverne Baker at the Memorial Auditorium, Chattanooga, TN. 27 May 1955. Baltimore, MD: Globe Poster, 1955. 22 1/4 x 28 1/2 in. poster printed on cardstock (toning, some soiling, area of loss across the bottom edge, some fading at the bottom right corner). Boxing-style poster featuring an incredible lineup of R & B performers, headlined by Roy Hamilton, The Drifters, and Laverne Baker, along with Willie Mabon, The Spaniels, The Hearts, Jimmy Reed, Erskine Hawkins, and Little Walkin' Willie. Portraits of featured acts and some of their hit songs are also noted. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 157 - [MUSIC]. EULA, Joe, artist. The Supremes. Lincoln Center Philharmonic Hall. Friday, October 15, 1965. Signed by Mary WILSON (1944-2021).

[MUSIC]. EULA, Joe, artist. The Supremes. Lincoln Center Philharmonic Hall. Friday, October 15, 1965. Signed by Mary WILSON (1944-2021). New York: Distributed by Darien House Inc., 1965. 24 x 37 1/2 in. (sight) poster, framed, 28 x 41 1/2 in. (unexamined outside frame, small chip to top right edge visible). A stylistic rendering of The Supremes, Motown's most successful act of the 1960s, produced by fashion illustrator Joe Eula. Signed lower left by Mary Wilson ("Mary Wilson"), one of the founding members of the legendary female group. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 158 - [MUSIC]. From the USA. Little Stevie Wonder. Mojo Club, Sheffield, England. 8 October [1967].

[MUSIC]. From the USA. Little Stevie Wonder. Mojo Club, Sheffield, England. 8 October [1967]. 20 x 29 3/4 in. poster, red printed on white (pinholes at corners and right and left edges, light creasing, light soiling, some edge and corner wear incl. few creases and chips). A poster produced during the early years of Stevie Wonder's storied career, when he was called "Little Stevie," a nickname given to him by Motown Records founder Berry Gordy Jr. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 159 - [MUSIC]. In Person. Double Dynamite! Sam and Dave. La Chic Club, Ft. Worth, TX. 4 November [1973].

[MUSIC]. In Person. Double Dynamite! Sam and Dave. La Chic Club, Ft. Worth, TX. 4 November [1973]. 18 x 23 1/2 in. poster printed on heavy cardstock (some creasing, edge wear, loss to top left corner). Boxing-style poster featuring a portrait of the legendary soul and R & B due Sam and Dave at center, with some of their greatest hits listed, including "Soul Man" and "Hold On I'm Coming." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 160 - [MUSIC]. 3 posters promoting female musicians of the 20th-21st centuries, incl. Aretha Franklin and Erykah Badu.

[MUSIC]. 3 posters promoting female musicians of the 20th-21st centuries, incl. Aretha Franklin and Erykah Badu. GLASER, Milton, artist. Aretha. [1968]. 19 1/8 x 25 in. offset lithograph poster of Aretha Franklin, originally issued with the November 1968 issue of Eye magazine (folds, creasing, 2 in. vertical edge tear near top right corner, small holes top right and left corners). Articles printed on reverse. -- Aretha. Friday, May 9th, 9pm at the Spectrum and the Dells. Philadelphia, PA, [1969]. 13 3/4 x 21 1/2 in. poster printed on cardstock (5 punctures from staples, most notably one affecting the area near Aretha's neck, wear to edges incl. loss near top right and left, edge tear at right center). A vibrant portrait of Aretha singing is depicted at center. [With:] EMEK, artist. Erykah Badu. Moscow, Russia. 19 April 2008. 17 x 25 5/8 in. silkscreen poster (very fine condition, short vertical tear near center bottom edge). A limited edition poster signed and dated lower right, "Emek '08," numbered 158 of 350. Together, 3 posters. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 161 - [MUSIC]. A group of 12 programs and magazines featuring African American musicians, incl. Diana Ross and the Supremes, Aretha Franklin, and Ray Charles.

[MUSIC]. A group of 12 programs and magazines featuring African American musicians, incl. Diana Ross and the Supremes, Aretha Franklin, and Ray Charles. An Evening with Diana Ross and the Supremes. New York, NY: Raydell Publishing & Distributing Corp., publishers, 1968. Motown Record Corporation, Detroit, MI, copyright (creasing to covers). -- Aretha Franklin. Irvington, NJ: Gil Kravette, n.d. (surface abrasions to wrappers, creasing, chipping, some short tears). -- The Fifth Dimension. New York, NY: Raydell Publishing & Distributing Corp., ca 1970s. -- Ray Charles. New York, NY: Program Publishing Co., 1967. -- Alan Freed "Rock N Roll" Second Anniversary. New York, NY: Program Publishing Company, 1956 (toning, occasional soiling, wear to wrappers). [With:] 7 magazines showcasing African American musicians, ca 1950s-1970s, including: Song Time. -- Rhythm and Blues. -- Rock and Roll Songs. -- Song Hits of the Fabulous Fifties. -- Ebony Song Parade (3). Together, 12 programs and magazines. Wear generally good and consistent with age and use. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 162 - [MUSIC]. NEWMAN, Earl, artist. Monterey Jazz Festival. 1965.

[MUSIC]. NEWMAN, Earl, artist. Monterey Jazz Festival. 1965. 22 1/2 x 35 in. poster (horizontal crease through center, creasing and short tears to edges and corners incl. 2 in. tear near top right corner, tape repairs to edges and corners, holes at corners, slight residue near right edge). Dates listed September 17, 18, 19. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 163 - [MUSIC]. A group of 3 posters promoting performances by jazz musicians, incl. Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, and Hugh Masekela.

[MUSIC]. A group of 3 posters promoting performances by jazz musicians, incl. Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, and Hugh Masekela. Norman Granz Presents an Evening with Ella Fitzgerald. Palais des Beaux-Arts, Bruxelles. [Brussels, Belgium], 4 February 1968. 12 1/4 x 18 3/4 in. poster (folds, some creasing throughout, edge and corner wear including small pinholes to top edge and chipping, surface abrasion near lower right edge). "Belgique" ink stamp near lower right corner. [With:] Columbia Artists Festivals presents Dizzy Gillespie in Concert. New York, NY: Artcraft Lithograph & Printing Co., n.d., ca 1980. 14 x 22 in. poster on cardstock (light edge wear including some creasing to edges). Featuring a portrait of Gillespie at center after a photograph by Martin Cohen. [Also with:] JORDAN, Ken, artist. Hugh Masekela & the Union of South Africa and the Crusaders. "A people's concert" Sat., July 31, 8:00pm, Philharmonic Hall at Lincoln Center. New York, NY, n.d., ca early 1970s. 21 1/4 x 27 1/4 in. poster (toning, some spotting, creasing throughout, edge and corner wear including chipping and some short tears, several pinholes near corners). Together, 3 posters. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 164 - [MUSIC]. M. Morton Hall presents Nina Simone, Monday, January 15, Martin Luther King Day at Kennedy Center. N.p., [1979].

[MUSIC]. M. Morton Hall presents Nina Simone, Monday, January 15, Martin Luther King Day at Kennedy Center. N.p., [1979]. 23 x 29 in. printed poster on glossy cardstock (creasing and bumping to edges and corners, otherwise very good condition). A scarce poster promoting a concert held on Martin Luther King Day in early 1979 at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC, featuring the celebrated singer, songwriter, and civil rights activist, Nina Simone. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 165 - [MUSIC]. Poster promoting The Impressions, Gene Chandler, Jerry Butler, Gladys Knight & The Fabulous Pips, and other musical groups performing at the Memorial Auditorium, Chattanooga, TN. Philadelphia, PA: Posters Inc. 2 November [1965].

[MUSIC]. Poster promoting The Impressions, Gene Chandler, Jerry Butler, Gladys Knight & The Fabulous Pips, and other musical groups performing at the Memorial Auditorium, Chattanooga, TN. Philadelphia, PA: Posters Inc. 2 November [1965]. 22 x 28 poster printed on thick card stock (edge wear including some creasing and chipping). Boxing-style poster featuring several musical groups including The Impressions, Gene Chandler, Jerry Butler, Major Lance, The Three Ikettes, Barbara Mason, Fontella Bass, G.L. Crockett, and Gladys Knight and The Fabulous Pips. Portraits of the headliners are featured along with titles to some of their hit songs. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 166 - [MUSIC]. A group of 3 posters promoting African American gospel singers, incl. the 5 Blind Boys of Alabama and Shirley Ceasar.

[MUSIC]. A group of 3 posters promoting African American gospel singers, incl. the 5 Blind Boys of Alabama and Shirley Ceasar. Appearing in Person the Original 5 Blind Boys of Alabama and the Sensational Canaan Happyland Singers. Philadelphia: Keystone Poster Printing Co. Inc., n.d., [late 1960s?]. 14 x 22 in. poster printed on cardstock. Concert poster for renowned African American gospel group The Five Blind Boys of Alabama. After first performing together at the Alabama Institute for the Negro Deaf and Blind in Talladega in 1939, the group rose to prominence in the 1940s and 1950s. Though gospel music was on the decline during the mid-century, the group continued to tour and frequently preformed at concerts benefitting the civil rights movement and Martin Luther King, Jr. specifically. In 1969, founding member and frontman Clarence Fountain left the group but rejoined in 1977. This poster appears to date from the late 1960s before Fountain's departure. [With:] Chip Davis Productions / A Head Above the Rest & O.J.'s Barber Shop present Blessings from Heaven Featuring Shirley Caesar. Veterans' Memorial Auditorium, Columbus, OH. Baltimore, MD: Globe Poster Printing Corp., 1996. 16 1/2 x 29 in. poster printed on cardstock (holes/punctures near each corner, light soiling, some creasing). Portraits of Grammy Award winning gospel singer Shirley Ceasar and other featured acts are presented. -- Down Lo Promotions Presents Tour of Hope '98. Veterans' Memorial Auditorium, Columbus, OH. N.p., 21 June 1998. 17 1/4 x 22 1/4 in. poster printed on cardstock (holes/punctures near each corner, soiling, creasing). Featured acts include Shirley Caesar, Yolanda Adams, and The Canton Spirituals. Together, 3 posters. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 167 - [MUSIC]. CRUMB, Robert, artist. Maxwell Street Alley Blues. Big John Wrencher and his Maxwell Street Blues Boys. [With:] 3 posters promoting Blues performances.

[MUSIC]. CRUMB, Robert, artist. Maxwell Street Alley Blues. Big John Wrencher and his Maxwell Street Blues Boys. [With:] 3 posters promoting Blues performances. 15 1/2 x 15 1/2 in. silkscreen print, matted and framed, 24 x 24 in. overall (very fine condition, unexamined outside frame). A limited edition print signed and dated lower right, "R. Crumb 2017," numbered 12 of 125. [With:] King of the Blues Lightnin' Hopkins [His Only Berkeley appearance outside the Blues Festival] and Dan Paik. 26 & 27 April n.d. Berkeley, CA: The Jabberwock. 14 1/2 x 23 1/4 in. poster (some creasing, including diagonal crease extending from right edge through "pk" in "Hopkins", minimal spotting). -- Chicago Blues Festival. Petrillo Music Shell Grant Park, 8, 9, 10 June 1984. Chicago, IL: Graphics & Reproduction Center, 1984. 20 x 31 in. poster mounted on foam core board (some surface wear, edge and corner wear including some creasing). -- Benny Latimore in Concert. Singing: Let's Straighten it Out. East of the Ryan Ballroom. Chicago, IL: n.p., 21 March 1998. 16 3/4 x 26 in. poster on thick cardstock (edge and corner wear including creasing, holes in margins and near corners, some chipping to edges). Featuring a portrait of Benny Latimore. Together, 4 items. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 168 - [MUSIC]. An Evening with...B.B. King, the King of Blues. With Special Guest Artist 15 Year Old Renowned Keyboardist...Joey DeFrancesco and Strictly Business. Playhouse Theatre, Wilmington, DE. Baltimore, MD: Globe Poster, 29 May n.d., ca 1960s.

[MUSIC]. An Evening with...B.B. King, the King of Blues. With Special Guest Artist 15 Year Old Renowned Keyboardist...Joey DeFrancesco and Strictly Business. Playhouse Theatre, Wilmington, DE. Baltimore, MD: Globe Poster, 29 May n.d., ca 1960s. 22 x 35 in. poster printed on cardstock (light soiling, some edge and corner wear including light creasing). Boxing-style poster featuring a portrait of B.B. King near the top. Included is an additional promotion for an "After Concert Party at Ambrosia Night Club" featuring the "Four Tops" as the "coming attraction." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 169 - [MUSIC - JIMI HENDRIX]. ROBERTS, Joe, Jr. "The Experienced." Los Angeles, CA: R.S.C., Cocorico Graphics, ca 1960s.

[MUSIC - JIMI HENDRIX]. ROBERTS, Joe, Jr. "The Experienced." Los Angeles, CA: R.S.C., Cocorico Graphics, ca 1960s. 21 x 30 3/4 in. blacklight poster (some areas of creasing, small pinholes and some chipping to margins, slight loss to top left corner, 3 1/2 in. tear extending from top edge repaired with adhesive on verso, additional tape on verso). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 170 - [MUSIC]. A group of 2 posters promoting performances by Ike & Tina Turner, comprising:

[MUSIC]. A group of 2 posters promoting performances by Ike & Tina Turner, comprising: GARRETT, Danny, artist. Ike and Tina Turner. Texas Opry House. 24 June 1974. 11 x 17 in. poster (toning, spotting/light soiling throughout, some edge and corner wear). A poster promoting Ike and Tina Turner's performance at the Texas Opry House in Austin, which was described as "an impressive concert" by the The Austin American-Statesman in a 25 June 1974 review of the show. The review noted, "From the first raspy chord to the final strobe-lit dance, the band was in command and the audience knew it." [With:] TUTEN, Randy, artist. Winterland Presents Ike and Tina Turner / Spirit / Southwind / Bert Sommer. San Francisco, CA: 1970. 14 x 21 in. poster (creasing throughout, edge and corner wear). Together, 2 posters. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 171 - [MUSIC]. 2 advertisements for African American funk and soul bands incl. the Isley Brothers and Booker T & the MG's at the Cow Palace.

[MUSIC]. 2 advertisements for African American funk and soul bands incl. the Isley Brothers and Booker T & the MG's at the Cow Palace. Soul 70 Comes to Town with the Isley Bros., The Dells, Booker T & the MG's...at the Cow Palace. [San Francisco, CA], 6 February [1970]. 5 3/4 x 8 1/2 in. printed handbill (fold, light creasing, tape residue on verso). -- The Groove Academy Presents Bootsy's Rubber Band Feat: Bernie Worrell. Manhattan Center, NY, 19 October, ca 1990s. 4 x 5 1/4 in. printed advertisement (very good overall, adhesive residue on verso). -- Together, 2 posters promoting musical performances. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 172 - [MUSIC]. Sly and the Family Stone. Paramount Northwest. Seattle, WA: Train Printing & Poster Co., [1973].

[MUSIC]. Sly and the Family Stone. Paramount Northwest. Seattle, WA: Train Printing & Poster Co., [1973]. 13 1/2 x 22 in. window card printed on thick cardstock (light creasing and wear to edges). An action-shot of Sly depicted in neon green is shown at center. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 173 - [MUSIC]. A group of 2 Bob Marley posters, comprising:

[MUSIC]. A group of 2 Bob Marley posters, comprising: Bob Marley & The Wailers On Tour! Munich, 13 June 1980. 23 1/2 x 33 in. poster (light creasing, light edge and corner wear). -- Bob Marley and the Wailers / Rasta Revolution. N.p., n.d. 24 x 33 3/4 in. poster (creasing through, including margins, edge and corner wear including chipping, some tears, and pinholes). -- Together, 2 posters. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 174 - [LITERATURE]. HURSTON, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1937.

[LITERATURE]. HURSTON, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1937. 8vo. Publishers original orange cloth lettered in black, with original dust jacket (some light staining to cloth binding; dust jacket heavily worn, with some chips, tears, and areas of loss). FIRST EDITION of what many consider to be Zora Neale Hurston's most revered work. Written over a period of seven weeks in Haiti, Their Eyes Were Watching God is a classic title from the Harlem Renaissance, featuring a strong, independent Black female protagonist on a quest to find her true identity. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 175 - [POETRY]. 2 titles, incl.: BROWN, Sterling. Negro Poetry and Drama. Washington, DC: The Associates in Negro Folk Education, 1937.

[POETRY]. 2 titles, incl.: BROWN, Sterling. Negro Poetry and Drama. Washington, DC: The Associates in Negro Folk Education, 1937. 8vo (5 1/2 x 8 1/4 in.), original decorated boards (some edge and corner wear to boards, incl. light crease to back board, light edge wear to interior pages). This book was an offering (No. 7) in a series entitled "Bronze Booklets", which looked at "the history, problems and cultural contributions of the Negro." The volume was compiled by Black scholar and Howard professor Sterling A. Brown and details the contribution of Black people to American drama and poetry. [With:] MEARNS, Hugh, General Editor. The Pamphlet Poets. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1927. 8vo (5 1/2 x 8 1/2 in.), stapled paper wrappers (front cover fully separated with chipping and edge loss, some toning, edge wear to interior pages). Printed by Simon and Schuster as part of the series "Four Negro Poets," the pamphlet contains poems by Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, and Jean Toomer, and includes an introduction by Alain Locke.

Lot: 176 - HUGHES, Langston (1902-1967). Print program from the "Tenth Annual Festival of Music and Drama" signed ("Langston Hughes"). Carnegie Hall, New York, 9 February 1963.

HUGHES, Langston (1902-1967). Print program from the "Tenth Annual Festival of Music and Drama" signed ("Langston Hughes"). Carnegie Hall, New York, 9 February 1963. 16pp, 8 1/2 x 11 in. (light wear and soil). Hughes, who served as the emcee for this February 1963 WLIB Festival of Negro Music and Drama, boldly signs the cover "awards presented by Langston Hughes." The festival's presenting radio station, New York City's WLIB, had in the 1950s targeted large amounts of programming to African American audiences and became a leading voice of New York's black residents. In the 1960s, the station was one of several jazz stations in New York. Among the performers at the festival were the "Combined Choirs of Antioch Baptist Church, Brooklyn," pioneering African American soprano Camilla Williams, as well as multiple rhythm & blues, jazz, and gospel groups. The program notes that "Miss Ella Fitzgerald" was to be the recipient of the WLIB Festival Award. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 177 - [ART]. MacLeish, Norman. Exhibition of Negro Artists of Chicago. Washington, DC: Howard University Gallery of Art, 1941.

[ART]. MacLeish, Norman. Exhibition of Negro Artists of Chicago. Washington, DC: Howard University Gallery of Art, 1941. 4pp., 8 x 11 in. (dampstaining, soiling, creasing, 1 1/4 in. separation to bottom of fold edge). Exhibition brochure lists artists on front page, from Henry Carter to Charles White. The second page features an introduction by Norman MacLeish titled "Negro Art in Chicago," in which he pays tribute to the recently deceased Black artist, George Neal. In part: "George Neal, a painter of marked ability and purpose, lived in the district and saw about him latent creative talent expressing itself in many whimsical ways. Possessed of enthusiasm and am ambition to give direction to this talent, he gathered about him a group of promising young painters who became his pupils...No one could afford to pay him for instruction and the few sales which he made of his paintings were for pitifully small sums. More important to him than money or humiliation was his desire to impart what he knew about painting to his people...George Neal is still alive among his followers who are transmitting it to those who follow them." A full catalogue of the artworks in the exhibition (in varying media) extends over the final two pages. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 178 - [ART]. [WEEDEN, Maria Howard (1847-1905)]. Portrait of an elderly African American woman.

[ART]. [WEEDEN, Maria Howard (1847-1905)]. Portrait of an elderly African American woman. Watercolor, n.d., on 9 x 11 in. board (toning, some residue near top edge, minimal spotting). Signed lower left. Maria Howard Weeden, who signed her work and published as Howard Weeden, was an American artist and poet based in Huntsville, Alabama. She was well-known for her nuanced portraits of formerly enslaved people. Property from the Collection of George C. Kaiser, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Lot: 179 - [ENSLAVEMENT]. ULMANN, Doris, and PETERKIN, Julia. Roll, Jordan, Roll. Text by Julia Peterkin. The Photographic Studies by Doris Ulmann. New York: Robert O. Ballou, 1933.

[ENSLAVEMENT]. ULMANN, Doris, and PETERKIN, Julia. Roll, Jordan, Roll. Text by Julia Peterkin. The Photographic Studies by Doris Ulmann. New York: Robert O. Ballou, 1933. Large 4to (8 1/2 x 11 3/4 in.), ½ gilt-lettered white linen over embossed brown boards, profile of an African American man embossed onto front cover, top edge gilt (scattered spotting to spine; overall the plates are clean and bright, with occasional light spotting/staining). Illustrated with 90 full-page, hand-pulled copper photogravures after photographs by Ulmann depicting formerly enslaved people and their descendants on the Gullah coastal region of South Carolina. LIMITED ISSUE, 122 of 350 copies signed and numbered by Ulmann and Peterkin on the colophon. Accompanied by a separate photogravure of a young African American female subject signed by Ulmann. Roll, Jordan, Roll was critically acclaimed for providing a narrative account examining the descendants of formerly enslaved African Americans living in the Gullah coastal region of South Carolina as fully-dimensional individuals rather than as stereotypes. American photographer Doris Ullman (1882-1934) conceived of the idea for the book following a meeting with Julia Peterkin at a literary gathering in 1929. The portraits of the Gullah subjects were taken on the Lang Syne plantation, located near St. Matthews, Calhoun County, South Carolina. Ullman's portraits were then paired with stories composed by Peterkin and presented in what is considered one of the greatest documentary photobooks of the 1930s. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 180 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 3 prints related to the Atlantic slave trade, including plans for two forts along Africa's west coast.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 3 prints related to the Atlantic slave trade, including plans for two forts along Africa's west coast. van der SCHLEY, Jakob, after William Smith. Zuid-West Gezigt van't Fort Winneba, of Wimba. N.p., n.p., ca 1727. Etched view of Fort Winneba, in modern-day Ghana, from the south west. Image 11 x 7 1/2 in. (sheet 13 1/8 x 10 1/2 in.) (Some creasing, loss, chipping and toning to edges, with modern adhesive remnants to verso). Features a cartouche containing a small aerial diagram of the fort, with sections labelled by letter and a key to the left. Fort Winneba was built by the Royal African Company in 1694, with the purpose of facilitating the trade of enslaved people. William Smith, who had been appointed to review the Company's castles in Africa, surveyed the fort in 1727. Plan de l'Isle de Goré Avec ses Fortifications. N.p.: n.p., ca 1760s]. Etched plan of the island of Gorée, located along the west coat of Africa in the harbor of Dakar, Senegal. Image 10 3/4 x 7 3/4 (sheet 14 3/8 x 10 1/8 in.) (Some Creasing, toning, and minor chipping to edges.) Features Fort St. Francois and Fort St. Michel, along with several supporting batteries. Cartouche to upper right; compass rose and rhumb lines above key map to lower left. The island of Gorée was instrumental in the trade of enslaved persons between African and the Americas. The Dutch first fortified the island in the early 17th century, but it was seized by France in 1677 and purposed as their trading center for enslaved persons being transported to the Indies. Lithographed scene and diagram, image 5 x 8 1/2 in. (sheet 7 1/2 x 10 1/2 in.) (Likely disbound from a volume, with soiling, spotting, brittleness to edges, and tape remnants to verso). Two parts include a scene of an African subject dancing with spectators in the background, captioned in Italian, "La Danza di Sango in Congo," and a diagram, showing profile and floor views, of a slave ship captioned, "Una nave di Schiavi." The translated version of both captions are roughly "Sango dance in Congo," and "a slave ship," respectively. (RARE: only one other version could be located, and it is a colored version held at the Villèle Museum, Department of Réunion). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 181 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. CDV of a plantation scene featuring enslaved workers picking cotton. N.p., n.d., ca 1860s.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. CDV of a plantation scene featuring enslaved workers picking cotton. N.p., n.d., ca 1860s. 3 x 2 1/4 in. CDV on cardstock mount (toning, minimal spotting to mount). An uncredited, outdoor photograph showing approximately 8 enslaved people harvesting cotton with two white overseers on horseback visible in the distance.

Lot: 182 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. BRADY, Mathew, photographer. Slave Pen, Alexandria, Va. New York: E. & H.T. Anthony, ca 1860s.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. BRADY, Mathew, photographer. Slave Pen, Alexandria, Va. New York: E. & H.T. Anthony, ca 1860s. 6 1/4 x 3 1/8 in. stereoview on cardstock mount (toning, spotting, some edge and corner wear to mount). View capturing the interior of a "slave pen," showing the doors of cells where the enslaved individuals were held before being sold. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Early Photography Collection of Jules Martino, Silverton, Oregon

Lot: 183 - CHANCELLOR, Dr. William (1727-1762). Autograph letter signed ("Wm. Chancellor"), with reference to the transatlantic slave trade. London. 1 September 1761.

CHANCELLOR, Dr. William (1727-1762). Autograph letter signed ("Wm. Chancellor"), with reference to the transatlantic slave trade. London. 1 September 1761. 2pp, 14 1/4 x 12 in. (sight) framed to 15 1/4 x 13 in. (unexamined outside frame, creasing, tears at folds, small losses not affecting text). Addressed to Richard Wister, a merchant on Market Street in Philadelphia. Chancellor writes to Wister with news of his arrival in London, as well as his ongoing studies with surgeons and at hospitals to advance his medical knowledge. In a postscript below his signature, Chancellor adds: "If Dr. Bond or Greme [Graeme] should die put in for my being the person appointed to search the Dutch ships as I understand the trade will be largely carried on." Chancellor may refer here to the continuation of the slave trade despite the ongoing French and Indian War. The position which he seeks in Philadelphia is an appointment by the assembly as an inspector of unhealthy ships, specifically ones arriving with cargo consisting of enslaved men, women, and children from Africa. William Chancellor worked as a doctor on board the sloop "Wolf" when it departed New York in September 1749 as part of a 20-month slaving voyage to the coast of West Africa. The surviving volume of the diary he kept while on board documents the misery he witnessed amongst the captured Africans. That diary, along with one other letter written to a friend on 6 September 1761, are the only other manuscripts by Chancellor known still to exist. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 184 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION] -- [QUAKERS]. The Epistle from the Yearly-Meeting in London, Held by Adjournments, from the 15th of the Fifth Month 1780, to the 20th of the same, inclusive. [London]:[Society of Friends], [1780].

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION] -- [QUAKERS]. The Epistle from the Yearly-Meeting in London, Held by Adjournments, from the 15th of the Fifth Month 1780, to the 20th of the same, inclusive. [London]:[Society of Friends], [1780]. 4pp, 8 1/2 x 13 1/4 in. (creasing at center fold, separation at folds, light soil). Signed in type by William Bleckly, Clerk to the Meeting. OCLC indicates this version, where the "L" of "London" in title falls under the "A" of "Yearly-Meeting," may be an American line-by-line reprint. Provenance: Deaccession stamp from collections of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Reporting on front page states that "the just and charitable endeavors of friends on that continent [America] have so happily succeeded, that the slavery of the poor negroes is nearly put an end to amongst them, and has greatly decreased amongst those of other professions." Reflecting accounts and epistles from New England, New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey, the author relays an optimistic assessment of the progress of abolitionist Quakers in those regions and on the status of enslavement in the northern American colonies. Despite progress, however, it would be more than two decades before all Northern states had voted to abolish the institution of slavery within their borders. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 185 - [REVOLUTIONARY WAR]. CHESWILL, Wentworth (1746-1817). Document signed ("Wentworth Cheswill") as Justice of the Peace. Newmarket, NH, 12 October 1812.

[REVOLUTIONARY WAR]. CHESWILL, Wentworth (1746-1817). Document signed ("Wentworth Cheswill") as Justice of the Peace. Newmarket, NH, 12 October 1812. One page, 7 3/4 x 12 3/4 in., old folds, some discoloration and wear to edges and fold intersections. Docketed verso. Partly printed writ issued by Cheswill (sometimes spelled "Cheswell") to the Rockingham County Sheriff to collect a debt owed by Joseph Purinton of Epping, New Hampshire. Wentworth Cheswill was born in 1746 in Newmarket, New Hampshire, where his grandfather, formerly enslaved, became the first black person to own land in 1717. Wentworth was born to a free biracial father and white mother, and went on to fight in the Revolutionary War. He served his town as a constable (elected in 1768), teacher, assessor, justice of the peace, and selectman throughout his life. He is said to be the first African American elected official in the United States. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 186 - [UPRISING OF ENSLAVED PEOPLE]. American Eagle. No. 1. Salem, MA: Thomas C. Cushing, 5 January 1790.

[UPRISING OF ENSLAVED PEOPLE]. American Eagle. No. 1. Salem, MA: Thomas C. Cushing, 5 January 1790. 4pp., folio, 10 1/2 x 16 1/2 in. Disbound (partially separated at central fold, chipping, tears including a few tears repaired with adhesive, some loss to edges, newspaper toned with occasional spotting). Original owner's name included in the upper right margin in brown iron gall ink. Page 3 of the newspaper reports on an uprising of enslaved people in Demerara (Guyana) on the northern coast of South America. The uprising was put down by the White Europeans and 30 enslaved people were executed for their part in the rebellion. This issue also contains news of William Paca, a signer of the Declaration of Independence from Maryland, being appointed by President George Washington as a Federal judge for the State of Maryland. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 187 - [SHIPWRECKS]. Manuscript testimony (court duplicate) of Thomas Kent, a Black man aboard the brigantine Britannia, wrecked off the coast of New Brunswick, British North America. 24 April 1835.

[SHIPWRECKS]. Manuscript testimony (court duplicate) of Thomas Kent, a Black man aboard the brigantine Britannia, wrecked off the coast of New Brunswick, British North America. 24 April 1835. 3pp, 7 7/8 x 12 3/4 in., folio, docketed on page 4 (some wear near folds, some toning). Signature of the notary, official embossed seal, and marked with an "X" by the sailor, Thomas Kent. The manuscript document, identified as a "Duplicate," contains the testimony of Thomas Kent, who was aboard the brigantine Britannia when the ship wrecked off the coast of New Brunswick. [With:] Contemporary newspaper account of the wreck. City of Saint John, New Brunswick, 16 March 1835. 2 3/4 x 6 in. clipping (some creasing). The newspaper account identifies the four survivors of the shipwreck by name, including "Thomas Kent a colored man." Together, the four men survived on a barrel of potatoes and by drinking the blood of a shark they caught the second day after the accident. Reports indicate that they were stranded at sea for seven or eight days before being rescued. Purportedly, the captain and other crew members drowned in the cabin section of the ship. A "colored man" was also killed with the master, T.W. Walker. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 188 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION - AMISTAD]. A group of 5 ALsS from attorneys and others involved in the Amistad case, including Lewis TAPPAN, Roger BALDWIN, Henry GILPIN, and Theodore SEDGWICK.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION - AMISTAD]. A group of 5 ALsS from attorneys and others involved in the Amistad case, including Lewis TAPPAN, Roger BALDWIN, Henry GILPIN, and Theodore SEDGWICK. TAPPAN, Lewis (1788-1873). Autograph letter signed ("Lewis Tappan"). New York, [NY]. 1p, 22 April [n.y.]. Tappan writes regarding making a payment on his account and expressing his satisfaction with the service and charges proffered by recipient. New York abolitionist and founder of the American Missionary Association who in 1839 was instrumental in securing lawyers and public support for the captive Africans on the Amistad following their slave revolt. BALDWIN, Roger Sherman (1793-1863). Autograph letter signed ("R.S. Baldwin"). 2pp, 26 June 1843. Referencing a claim against Isaac Hammond. 32nd Governor of Connecticut from 1844 to 1846 and a United States senator from 1847 to 1851. As a lawyer, his career was most notable for his participation in the 1841 Amistad case. GILPIN, Henry Dilworth (1801-1860). Autograph letter signed ("Henry D. Gilpin"). 2pp, 5 March 1858. Thanking his recipient for "the very agreeable volume, 'The Chemistry of the Seasons.'" -- Autograph letter signed ("H.D. Gilpin"). 2pp, 15 February 1846. Addressed to The Honorable George Bancroft. Gilpin makes apologies for not joining Bancroft at an evening engagement. 14th Attorney General of the United States under President Martin Van Buren from 1840 to 1841. He served as the 2nd Solicitor of the United States Treasury from 1837 to 1840 and U.S. Attorney for the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania from 1831 to 1837. President Martin Van Buren named him 14th Attorney General of the United States in 1840. He served until 1841, during which time he presented the U.S. government's side of the Amistad case to the U.S. Supreme Court. SEDGWICK, Theodore Jr. (1780-1839). Autograph letter signed ("Th Sedgwick, Jr."). 1p, 26 July 1829. Regarding a parcel containing proofs of Miss Sedgwick's new series. Sedgwick was one of three defense lawyers appointed part of the Africans' legal team by the Amistad Committee of the American Missionary Association. He would later become US Attorney for the Southern District of New York. [With:] BALDWIN, Roger Sherman (1793-1863). Clipped signature ("RS Baldwin"). 2 3/8 x 3/8 in. (mounted to blue paper, matted in display with half tone image of Baldwin and half tone court room illustration. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 189 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Letter from the Secretary of the Treasury, Transmitting a Statement of the Valuations of Lands, Lots, and Dwelling Houses, and of Slaves in the Several States...." Washington: William A. Davis, 1816.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Letter from the Secretary of the Treasury, Transmitting a Statement of the Valuations of Lands, Lots, and Dwelling Houses, and of Slaves in the Several States...." Washington: William A. Davis, 1816. Printed valuation document issued by United States Secretary of the Treasury A.J. [Alexander James] Dallas (1759-1817) to the Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives [Henry Clay], "In obedience to the resolution of the House of Representatives of the 22d instant...." 3pp, 8 1/4 x 13 in. (disbound, toning, chipping at edges). Dallas provides a statement of property values for 11 of the 18 states pursuant to the 1813 Act that ruled slaves as directly taxable property. "The States of New-Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, South-Carolina, Georgia, Ohio, and Kentucky, assumed and paid their quotas of the tax; and no valuations, therefore, were made, under the act of July 22d, 1813, in those States." He then lists "Values of lands, lots, and dwelling houses," "Value of slaves," and "Total valuation" for the remaining northern and southern states that had not already paid their quotas of taxes. Notably several northern states including Connecticut and New York still retained enslaved persons, and the one Louisiana district that reported reflects a value of lands, lots, and dwellings that was nearly identical to the value of the enslaved persons there residing. A powerful document reflecting an increasing north and south divide in slaveholding, and the disturbing reality of the valuation of slaves as taxable property. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 190 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Anti-Black satirical broadside. Greenfield, MA: N.p., [1818].

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Anti-Black satirical broadside. Greenfield, MA: N.p., [1818]. Bobolition of Slavery!!!! Grand Selebrashum by de Africum Shocietee!!!! Greenfield, MA: N.p., 1818. Visible 9 5/8 x 14 1/4 in. printed broadside (old folds, toned); matted and framed to 14 3/4 x 19 1/2 in. (not examined out of frame, dampstain to lower right of mat). Signed in type "Cesar Crack-Em-All". Text in three columns written in a dialect caricature satirizing the African Society of Boston's annual celebration of the end of the slave trade on July 14th. The African Society was a mutual aid society founded in 1796 by 44 African American freedmen living in Boston. In addition to charity lectures, they hosted an annual celebration commemorating the official end of the transatlantic trafficking of kidnapped Africans to the United States in 1808. RARE: OCLC locates only 1 copy held at the New-York Historical Society Library. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 191 - [AMERICAN COLONIZATION SOCIETY]. A group of 3 items related to American Colonization Society agents Ebenezer BURGESS and David CHRISTY. Ca 1830s.

[AMERICAN COLONIZATION SOCIETY]. A group of 3 items related to American Colonization Society agents Ebenezer BURGESS and David CHRISTY. Ca 1830s. BURGESS, Ebenezer (1790-1870). Autograph letter signed ("E. Burgess"), to Phillips Academy instructor Mr. James B. Richards. Dedham [Massachusetts], 14 October 1839. 1p, 7 3/4 x 10 in. (adhesive residue, creasing at folds, light soil). Burgess inquires if Richards is interested in a teaching engagement in the Upper Village District, and states that his sons inquire whether he might not teach them next winter. Burgess was a minister who served as an agent of the American Colonization Society, accompanying the Rev. Samuel J. Mills to explore the western coast of the African continent in 1817-1818. CHRISTY, David (1802-1882). A group of 2 receipts, signed ("D. Christy" and "David Christy"), dated 21 January 1832 and 19 June 1832, each approx. 8 x 2 1/2 in. Receipts issued for payment to Christy for publishing notices on behalf of executors for estates of the deceased. Christy was a prominent antislavery writer best known for his contribution to Cotton is King, and Pro-Slavery Arguments: Comprising the Writings of Hammond, Harper, Christy, Stringfellow, Hodge, Bledsoe, and Cartwright, on this Important Subject. Additional writings include those published in conjunction with the American Colonization Society such as African Colonization by the Free Colored People of the United States an Indispensable Auxiliary to African Missions (1854). This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 192 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. By Hewlett & Bright. Sale of Valuable Slaves, (On account of departure). New Orleans: Benjamin Levy, 1835.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. By Hewlett & Bright. Sale of Valuable Slaves, (On account of departure). New Orleans: Benjamin Levy, 1835. 11 1/8 x 16 1/2 in. letterpress broadside (laid down on paper, with separations, areas of loss, and discoloration throughout). This broadside advertises the sale of 10 enslaved persons, Sarah (45 years old), Dennis (Sarah's son, 24 years old), Chole (36 years old), Fanny (Chole's daughter, 16 years old), Dandridge (26 years old), Nancy (Dandridge's wife, 24 years old), Mary Ann (Nancy's daughter, 7 years old), Fanny or Frances (22 years old), Emma, (10 or 11 years old), and Frank (32 years old) by their enslaver, who is departing for Europe. The sale is slated to take place at the New Exchange on the corner of St. Louis Street and Chartres St., on Saturday 16 May. The enslaved persons are listed with further descriptions, including their inferred ethnicities (mulatress, mulatto, creole), skills, and character traits. For example, Fanny is described as "a mulatress, aged 16 years, speaks French and English, is a superior hair-dresser, (pupil of Guilliac,) a good seamstress and ladies' maid, is smart, intelligent, and a first rate character." Terms of sale listed at the bottom include "One-half Cash, and the other half in notes at Six months, drawn and endorsed to the satisfaction of the Vendor, with special mortgage on the Slaves until final payment." An example of this broadside is curated by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Photographs and Prints Division. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 193 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. 100 Dollars Reward! Ran Away from the service of Mr. George Ridenour, in Jefferson county, Virginia...a Negro Man named John. Charlestown, VA: 31 October 1839.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. 100 Dollars Reward! Ran Away from the service of Mr. George Ridenour, in Jefferson county, Virginia...a Negro Man named John. Charlestown, VA: 31 October 1839. 12 x 11 in. letterpress broadside (areas of loss, some with repair, spotting, soiling throughout). Signed in type by Richard Parran. A reward broadside offering $100 for the self-emancipated freedom seeker named John Morton. Broadside includes a physical description, in part: "He is very black, and has some apparent defect in his eyes, looking down when spoken to." Various reward amounts are listed for the apprehension of John in different locations: "Twenty-five Dollars reward will be given for the apprehension of John in Virginia; Fifty Dollars if secured in Maryland; or $100 if taken in Pennsylvania, so that I get him again, and all reasonable charges paid." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 194 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Marshal's Sale. Broadside promoting the public auction of two enslaved men. Louisville, KY, 30 September 1850.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Marshal's Sale. Broadside promoting the public auction of two enslaved men. Louisville, KY, 30 September 1850. 12 x 9 3/4 in. letterpress broadside (folds, toning, light smudges/soiling, some creasing to margins, wear to bottom edge). Undersigned in print by John A. Crittenden, MLCC, and Charles J. Meng, Deputy. Docketed verso: "Filed with Report / Sale Oct 11 1830." Broadside announces the 30 September 1850 public auction of "Two Negro Men--the one named Clark, about 25 years old; the other named Grandison, about 40 years old." The auction is part of a legal proceeding between "Albert E. Jones and Wife," and "Massena Fontaine's Heirs, &c." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 195 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Negroes For Sale. I will sell by Public Auction...Eight Valuable Family Servants. Warrenton, NC: 28 October 1859.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Negroes For Sale. I will sell by Public Auction...Eight Valuable Family Servants. Warrenton, NC: 28 October 1859. 10 7/8 x 8 in. letterpress broadside (linen-backed and varnished; some loss to edges/creases, dampstaining). Signed in type by Jacob August and auctioneer P.J. Turnbull. A broadside advertising the 29 November auction of "Eight Valuable Family Servants, consisting of one Negro Man, a first-rate field hand, one No. 1 Boy, 17 years of age, a trusty house servant, one excellent Cook, one House-Maid, and one Seamstress. The balance are under 12 years of age." Other examples of this broadside are curated by the Robert W. Woodruff Library as part of the Henry P. Slaughter Collection; the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division; and the Badagry Heritage Museum in Nigeria. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 196 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript legal document detailing the division of named enslaved individuals according to the last will and testament of their enslaver James Jordan Scott. Southampton County, [VA], 25 February 1786.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript legal document detailing the division of named enslaved individuals according to the last will and testament of their enslaver James Jordan Scott. Southampton County, [VA], 25 February 1786. [With:] additional estate document. 7 3/8 x 12 1/8 in. (creasing, small losses to crease intersections, light chipping, discoloration). Returned and docketed on verso 12 October 1786. "Pursuant and agreable [sic] to the last Will & Testament of James Jordan Scott deceased We proceeded to make a division of the negro's [sic] that belonged to the estate of the said dece'd and have divided them into five equal distinct and separate parts & portions as follows. To Wit.. Robin, Nenus, Celia and Rachel compose the first Lot or one fifth part of all the above said negro's which Miriam Scott widow of the said James Jordan Scott dec'd made choice of as and for her full share and proportion...the second lot...consists of negro's Old Will, Sue, young Will and Treasey...assigned to Ann Scott...the third lot...Consisting of negro's Pompey, Sam, Ben & Cherry...assigned to James Scott...the fourth lot...being negro's Edey, Cary, Mourning, & Sall...assigned to Robert Scott...the last fifth part or fifth lot Consisting of negro's Rose, Jenny, Frederick and Lewis...assigned to Sarah Scott..." [With:] 1825 estate inventory, approx. 7 3/4 x 12 1/2 in. (several rips, tears, chipping, and losses to edges and corners, toning and some dampstaining/spotting throughout). Individuals listed include Claiborne, Humphrey, and Alfred, described as "3 negro boys given to A.G. Prince" for $1475; Dave, Harry, and Graham, described as: "3 Boys given to Robert Prince" for $1350; James, described as "1 Boy...given to I[?].G.T. Prince" for $350; Lucinda, described as "1 woman given to Ths. Shelby" for $550; Isaac, described as "1 Boy...to W.B. Prince" for $350; and Henry, described as "1 Boy...to W. P[?]" for $350. The above individuals are listed as part of the estate of Robert Prince, sworn to before a probate judge on 25 July 1825. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 197 - RANDOLPH, Thomas Mann (1768-1828), Virginia Governor and Thomas Jefferson's son-in-law. Autograph letter signed ("Th. M. Randolph"), discussing financial matters and enslaved persons. Richmond, Virginia. 12 January 1824.

RANDOLPH, Thomas Mann (1768-1828), Virginia Governor and Thomas Jefferson's son-in-law. Autograph letter signed ("Th. M. Randolph"), discussing financial matters and enslaved persons. Richmond, Virginia. 12 January 1824. Stampless cover addressed to Manhattan financier and friend of Thomas Jefferson, Henry Remsen, Jr. (1762- 1843) at the office of the Manhattan Company, Wall Street, New York. 1p, 8 x 9 3/4 in. (toning, light soil, several small tears at folds). Randolph writes to Remsen regarding drafts made in payment of debts "on the Estate called Varina" and another on "the Estate called Edgehill in Albermarle...." He notes that he will "add all my slaves to the security" if there should be any doubt as to his repayment, and closes stating, "There are still 1200$ to pay on acct. of the lien upon Edgehill and the Negroes...." Thomas Mann Randolph descended from a "First Family" of Virginia, and was a descendant of Pocohontas through his mother. He served as a U.S. Representative from Virginia and later as the 21st Governor of Virginia from 1819-1822. He married Martha "Patsy" Jefferson Randolph (1772-1836), the eldest child of Thomas Jefferson, at Monticello on February 23, 1790. According to the Encyclopedia of Virginia, for their marriage settlement the Randolphs received two plantations, a 950-acre plantation called Varina in Henrico County that came with 40 enslaved persons, and 1,000 acres in Bedford County with 27 enslaved persons. The couple later acquired Edgehill Plantation in Albermarle County near Monticello. The marriage proved to be a difficult one, with Randolph's alcoholism and financial difficulties exacerbating the strained marriage. Due to debt, the Randolphs were forced to sell Varina in 1825. In 1826, they lost Edgehill to foreclosure when they were forced to sell the plantation to their son. A desperate letter demonstrating the close association of Thomas Jefferson and his family to the institution of chattel slavery. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 198 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript sale bill from the estate of William Anderson listing six enslaved persons, including male subject named "Anytime." N.p., possibly Virginia, March 1832.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript sale bill from the estate of William Anderson listing six enslaved persons, including male subject named "Anytime." N.p., possibly Virginia, March 1832. 1p, 7 1/4 x 12 1/2 in., bifolium, folds, toning, some smudges, docketing to terminal leaf. Manuscript sale bill of the estate of William Anderson listing six enslaved persons by name and price, as well as the individuals who purchased them. Includes a male subject named "Anytime" who was sold for $766. The list also includes mares and bushels of cotton. Consignor relates that this came from a Virginia estate. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 199 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Partly-printed "List of Taxable Property within the District of James D. Tennille Commissioner of the Revenue in the County of Prince William for the year 1848." Prince William County, Virginia, [1849].

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Partly-printed "List of Taxable Property within the District of James D. Tennille Commissioner of the Revenue in the County of Prince William for the year 1848." Prince William County, Virginia, [1849]. 17pp, approx. 16 1/2 x 14 in., string binding (rolled, chipping and tears at edges, particularly heavy and affecting text on pages 1-2, some dampstaining). Each page of document identifies "Person Chargeable with Tax," followed by columns indicating taxable property including "Slaves above 16 years of age" and "Slaves above 12 years of age." List is arranged in alphabetical order by last name. Enslavers were taxed on the state, county, and city levels before the Civil War. Commissioner of the Revenue James D. Tennille (1797-1868) was engaged in Prince William County politics for decades serving in a variety of roles including on the Committee of Vigilance. He was also an enslaver. This document lists him on page 16 as enslaving one slave above 16 years of age. An illustrative document demonstrating the way in which enslaved persons were valued as property, as well as the divisions between the planter class and the non-enslaving citizens of Virginia. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 200 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Four leaves from a ledger listing the Armistead and White family histories, incl. births of several enslaved individuals.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Four leaves from a ledger listing the Armistead and White family histories, incl. births of several enslaved individuals. Four leaves from a ledger book, each 6 1/2 x 7 1/2 in., with manuscript notations recording generations of births, deaths, and marriages, the latest notation recording the death of William P. White on 10 June 1865. Incorporated within the pages are records of the births of enslaved children alongside other family details. Leaves likely represent an attempted family history, compiled over time through to the 1880s. The births of 19 enslaved children are recorded in three separate entries under the heading "Births of Negroes." Children are all identified by first name, and in some cases with a surname as well. Among the enslaved children born are "James Spraggins" born 12 February 1847, "Jack Stanhope" born 16 July 1852, "Katy's Calvin" born 11 February [n.y.], and "Virgin Mary" born 22 February 1859. John W. Armistead (1818-1883) married Elizabeth White (1825-1906) in October 1844. The 1850 and 1860 US Federal Slave Schedules show that Armistead enslaved 10 persons in 1850 and 7 in 1860. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 201 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Letter from a Virginia enslaver describing the management of a plantation and its enslaved labor. N.p. [Virginia], 15 February 1852.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Letter from a Virginia enslaver describing the management of a plantation and its enslaved labor. N.p. [Virginia], 15 February 1852. 2pp, 7 3/4 x 9 3/4 in. (creasing at folds, loss on address leaf). Henry E. Edmunds (1814-1910) writes to his brother-in-law Samuel Hannah (1792-1859) regarding management of a plantation in Virginia: "I determined at once I would hire the men hands out & keep only the women & children on the farm to make what they could & take care of the plantation. I was fortunate enough to hire the 5 men to Mr. Thomas Harvey near R.C. for $135 apiece to work on the South Side R Road & I understand they are well pleased & doing well they are working some when in the neighborhood of Walker's Church & are permitted to come to see the wives once in four or five weeks...." Edmunds later refers to the escape of 90 slaves from the Kanawha region of western Virginia, an area near the Ohio border which utilized enslaved labor to operate the salt mines which permeated the area. "I see from the papers 90 negroes have run off from Kanawha. I hope you have lost none of yours if I was living in Kanawha after such a stampede as that I would start to run over this way as as fast I could come." The 1850 U.S. Federal Slave Schedule indicates that Edmunds enslaved at least 29 men, women, and children in Charlotte, Virginia. His letter provides a glimpse into the ways in which enslaved labor in Virginia was utilized beyond plantation-based agricultural production, while still subjecting enslaved persons to forced familial separations and difficult labor conditions. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 202 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Letter from Thomas Leigh to Allen K. Jones, Jack's Creek, TN, pertaining to payment for the rental of enslaved persons. Halifax Court House, VA, 27 August 1856.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Letter from Thomas Leigh to Allen K. Jones, Jack's Creek, TN, pertaining to payment for the rental of enslaved persons. Halifax Court House, VA, 27 August 1856. 1 page, 8 x 9 3/4 in., folds, toning and occasional spotting, light chipping. Addressed on verso, "Allen K. Jones, Jack's Creek, Henderson Cty., Tennessee." With original cover with black cancellation, "Halifax C.H., VA Aug. 27." Thomas Leigh writes to Allen K. Jones, "Enclosed you will find a check for $74.63 money collected on account of your negroes for the year 1855. I hope in a short time to collect & remit the balance of the hires." Leigh also mentions their crops of corn, which "are worse than ever known in this county," while "tobacco is tolerable." The community of Jack's Creek, Tennessee, was settled in the 1820s in Henderson (now Chester) County. It was the site of a Civil War battle involving 2,500 Confederate troops under General Nathan Bedford Forrest in September 1863. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 203 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Letter from a southern slave trader describing the transportation of enslaved persons from Virginia to auction markets in the Deep South, 1820.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Letter from a southern slave trader describing the transportation of enslaved persons from Virginia to auction markets in the Deep South, 1820. Stampless cover from "L.[?] Daly" addressed to Mr. William Townes of Boydton, [Mecklenburg County], Virginia. Union District, South Carolina. 28 March 1820. 2pp, 6 1/2 x 8 in. (dampstaining affecting text, chipping at edges, toning). Writing to Townes for the first time since his departure from Mecklenburg County, Daly describes his trip from Virginia through North Carolina and on to South Carolina, a journey undertaken to find the best market for the group of Townes's enslaved workers. Daly writes, in part: "The cause of my delay [in writing] has been principly [sic] in order to ascertain the price of Negroes so far as I could. Which I do assure you from the opportunities I have had as yet to learn the prospect is remarkably Gloomy....The Girl Hannah was taken sick in two days after I left home....To be candid with you sir she was damned hard bargain she has never walked any since taking sick but some what mended. I am somewhat at a loss sir to know whether I shall sell her for a sound Negro or not.... Judy & youngest child will be dull sale she is a tremendous ugly Negro. The Negroes will not be sold in South Carolina for the prices you spoke of. I believe they may in Georgia. I shall start to Georgia in two more days and assure you the best exertions will be made for your Interest.... Six hundred dollars for Judy & children is the most I have been offered as yet. Charles will sell well & [is the] most saleable Negro I have...." William Wade Townes (1791-1879) was a wealthy and influential Mecklenburg County businessman and owner of the plantation "Occoneechee." The 1830 U.S. Federal Census indicates that he enslaved 39 persons, while just a decade later that number had jumped to 160. The rise of cotton production in the Lower South and the end of the transatlantic slave trade in 1808 created a burgeoning market for the sale of enslaved labor. Hoping to maximize profits, Virginia enslavers like Townes sold enslaved people to meet the increasing demand for labor, often relying on slave traders to transport enslaved men, women, and children to urban centers in the Lower South for sale. This domestic slave trade yielded devastating consequences for enslaved persons, often resulting in the permanent separation of African American families. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 204 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Letter describing conditions on a Mississippi plantation, including the escape and punishment of an enslaved man "Ned." Honey Island, Mississippi. 3 March 1837.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Letter describing conditions on a Mississippi plantation, including the escape and punishment of an enslaved man "Ned." Honey Island, Mississippi. 3 March 1837. Stampless cover addressed to Dr. Lloyd Warfield of Lexington, Kentucky. 3 1/2 pp, 7 3/4 x 10 in. (creasing at folds, toning). Author's signature somewhat illegible, possibly Caleb Worley, who appears to be managing the plantation. Detailed letter describing conditions on a Mississippi plantation, most notably the health and status of multiple enslaved persons. The letter begins noting the pervasive sickness affecting the enslaved workers: "...we have a great deal of sickness this Summer and several deaths Nig [?] Jenny, Austin, Yelton, & Lame Billie, the latter died recently, Dianna's & Levinia's youngest children I believe have been all the death that have taken place....we now have a great many sick nig Loudon, Elias, Big Charles, Little Charles, Easter, Ellen, Diana, Silla, & Levinia scarcely any of the above named have done much work since the first August...." The author continues detailing the fever and violent convulsions that are affecting the enslaved workers, who are not able to take care of themselves. With the assistance of a "Doctor Mainerd," the author has been administering medicine to the sick. The letter then relates details of the overseer "Perkins" and the story of "Ned," an enslaved man who the author describes as "the biggest rascal I have ever known." Ned, who made an attempted escape, was returned to the plantation and chained until morning. When the author went to the slave quarters where Ned was chained he "shamed him," then "in our presence he attempted to cut his throat with a pen knife." Later the author states that he has declined to keep Ned at any price. The plantation on which Ned is enslaved appears to have been owned by partners from Lexington, Kentucky, Dr. Lloyd Warfield (1799-1872) and his brother-in-law Dr. Samuel Theobald (1790-1867), along with Caleb Worley (possibly early Mississippi settler and businessman ca 1773- ca 1850). A year after this letter was written, advertisements in the Vicksburg Tri-Weekly Sentinel (27 November 1838) and in the Lexington Union (1 December 1838) show that Warfield, Theobald, and Worley offered their Honey Island plantation for sale along with the 25 enslaved African Americans who resided there. Though the exact identity of "Ned" cannot be determined from this document, it is possible that the letter refers to Ned Rounds (b. ca 1825) who was born into slavery in Kentucky and was either sold or taken down South to Honey Island, Mississippi. After emancipation, Ned Rounds went on to become one of the largest landowners on Honey Island, and to serve as a banker for residents of the island. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 205 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 3 Virginia documents listing property including enslaved persons. Ca 1815-1854.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 3 Virginia documents listing property including enslaved persons. Ca 1815-1854. Manuscript receipt "A list of land & slaves owned by Jacob Campbell the first day of April 1815. The first district of Virginia Washington City." 1p, 7 1/2 x 4 in. (creasing, toning). Lists 8 enslaved persons by gender, age bracket, and value, totaling $2,170. [With:] Tax receipt for Miss Francis Jane Irby. Washington County, Virginia. 1854. 1p, 6 1/4 x 2 in. (light creasing at center fold). Taxable categories include "Black" titheables as well as other personal property, salary, land, and a road levy. -- Tax receipt for Robert L. and John Berry. Washington County, 1848. 1p, 6 3/4 x 2 in. (toning, creasing, scattered marks). Taxable "Revenue" items include "Slaves" as well as horses, clocks, and land. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 206 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 4 documents identified to the Carr and Tebbs families of Virginia, incl. references to the manumission and sale of enslaved persons.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 4 documents identified to the Carr and Tebbs families of Virginia, incl. references to the manumission and sale of enslaved persons. Documents spanning 1791-1854, comprising: Manuscript copy of the 23 January 1790 Last Will & Testament of enslaver William Carr of Prince William County, Virginia. 8 February 1791. 8pp, 8 x 10 in. (toning,

Lot: 207 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of six letters associated with enslaved individuals, including a letter related to the Randolph family of Virginia.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of six letters associated with enslaved individuals, including a letter related to the Randolph family of Virginia. RANDOLPH, Col. Archibald Cary (1769-1813). Autograph letter signed to his brother, Thomas Randolph (1771-1811), then serving as Attorney General of the Indiana Territory. Millwood, [Virginia]. 22 February 1810. 2pp, 8 x 9 3/4 in. (creasing at folds, small tears). The elder Randolph writes, in part, regarding the financial difficulties that have befallen their brother Isham Randolph: "his large & helpless family will require all the aid you can afford him...his lease is taken from him & all the negroes sold, so that he is now entirely without house or home...." The Randolph family was one of the wealthiest and most powerful families in Virginia. The 1810 U.S. Federal Census indicates that Isham Randolph enslaved ten persons, while his brother Archibald enslaved 34 persons. [With:] Five letters related to enslavement: B.J. Britt writes to Col. M. Cooke of Norfolk, Virginia, regarding the sale and transport of "Old Sizzy," 26 January 1848; Nathaniel Curreau (sp?) writes to Mr. Henry Moffit of Washington, D.C., regarding a legal case in which $6200 was offered for the sale of negroes to settle a dispute and pay a debt, 8 November 1842; William Crawley writes to Col. Wilson Hemingway of Jackson, Mississippi, regarding "the girl Francis" whose chill was cured with a mixture of "calomal, quinine & sage"4 May 1845; and two more, one regarding transport of "negroes" and another regarding the health of a young enslaved child. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 208 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A pair of documents related to claims for compensation made by enslavers to the Confederate States Army for deceased slaves. South Carolina, 1864-65.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A pair of documents related to claims for compensation made by enslavers to the Confederate States Army for deceased slaves. South Carolina, 1864-65. Partly-printed "Original Receipt" for "Claim No.125." Columbia, South Carolina. 8 January 1864. 1p, 8 1/2 x 6 in. (dampstaining, creasing). Signed by enslaver Alex Austin acknowledging receipt from the state of South Carolina of $2,000 "for compensation for his slave, named Butler, lost by reason of the employment of the said slave by the authorities of the Confederate Government upon the military fortifications in this State." Docketed on verso. [With:] ASHLEY, William (1797-1879). Autograph letter signed ("Wm. Ashley"), to South Carolina state auditor James Tupper. [Barnwell District, S.C.], 7 January 1865. 1p, 6 1/4 x 7 1/2 in. (creasing, toning). Enslaver Ashley writes to Tupper stating that "you owe me for two negroes..." impressed into the Confederate war effort. Docketing on verso. The 1860 U.S. Federal Slave Schedule indicates that Ashley enslaved 108 men, women, and children. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 209 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A pair of Georgia documents related to the selling of alcohol to African Americans. 1845, 1865.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A pair of Georgia documents related to the selling of alcohol to African Americans. 1845, 1865. Partly printed liquor license issued to Thomas Cunningham and Son. Decatur County, GA, 10 December 1845. 12 1/2 x 7 in. (chipping and toning to edges). Signed and witnessed. First section declares: "I do solemnly swear, That I will not, during the next succeeding twelve months, barter, give away, sell or furnish, to any slave or slaves, any measure or quantity of distilled or spiritous or intoxicating liquors, without the verbal or written consent of the owners or employers of such slave or slaves, or without the consent of the guardian of any free persons of color; and I do further swear, that I will not allow any other person to do so for my by approbation, consent or knowledge, so help me God." Manuscript jury decision issuing a guilty verdict against defendant Jesse Owens for "the offense of Furnishing a Free person of color with spirituous liquors." Upson County, GA, 1865. 12 1/2 x 7 3/4 in. (creasing, some separations and chipping, toning/staining). Docketed verso. A list of "Petit Jurors" is tipped in, bearing case title: "The State vs. Jesse L. Owen[s]" and the crime: "Selling a free Person of Color Spiritus [sic] Liquor" on front and sentence: "pay fine of Fifty Dollars & all costs & be confined in the common jail of this county for ten days..." An interesting pair of documents representing multiple angles of the same Georgia law and providing proof of the lingering probations against selling liquor to all African Americans in Georgia right up until the collapse of the Confederacy. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 210 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A marriage license and certificate for a freedman and freedwoman. Talbot County, GA, 1866.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A marriage license and certificate for a freedman and freedwoman. Talbot County, GA, 1866. 8 x 10 in. partly printed marriage license and certificate (creasing, minor losses, ink smearing). Docketed verso. License authorizes the union of "Cicero Vaughn (freedman) and Ellen Gorman (freedwoman)" in holy matrimony, dated 15 September 1866. Below, the couple's marriage is certified on the same date. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 211 - [ALABAMA - SLAVERY & ABOLITION]. Mobile Gazette and Commercial Advertiser. Vol. III, No. 58. Mobile, AL: Dade & Dameron, 12 April 1820.

[ALABAMA - SLAVERY & ABOLITION]. Mobile Gazette and Commercial Advertiser. Vol. III, No. 58. Mobile, AL: Dade & Dameron, 12 April 1820. 4pp., folio, 12 x 18 in. (fully separated at central fold, chipping, creasing, short tears, and some loss at edges, toning and occasional spotting). The issue contains at least two advertisements for self-emancipated freedom seekers as well as advertisements promoting the sale of enslaved individuals. It also includes a page 2 headline and news of Maine becoming a new state in the Union in the compromise of 1820. RARE: Very early newspaper published in Alabama, which had just achieved statehood in December 1819. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 212 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Partly printed document identifying 24 enslaved men, women, and children to be sold at auction. Lawrence County, Alabama, 30 December 1840.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Partly printed document identifying 24 enslaved men, women, and children to be sold at auction. Lawrence County, Alabama, 30 December 1840. Legal document recording the lien on the property of a Benjamin Sherrod, for which debts "the above named goods and chattels" are to be delivered to the court and the square at the appointed time for public auction. Named are enslaved persons: "Jim Cithy Jacob, Mariah Lowesa Rose Little Jacob Nelson Bradford Nelly Wyate Elvira Linsy Arly Ishell George Elijah Black Jim Amey David Thomas Arch Sandy Stephen." 8 1/4 x 11 1/2 in. (sight), framed to14 1/4 x 17 3/4 in. (unexamined outside frame, creasing, toning). Enslaver Benjamin Sherrod (1777-1847) was one of the early settlers of Lawrence County. Sherrod became a wealthy planter and a promoter of the Tuscumbia, Courtland, and Decatur Railroad. The 1840 U.S. Federal Census indicates that he enslaved 353 men, women, and children. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 213 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript legal document involving the estate of Solomon Boggan, who left an enslaved male subject to his grandson Wingate Boggan, a minor. Wilcox County, AL, 8 August 1847.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript legal document involving the estate of Solomon Boggan, who left an enslaved male subject to his grandson Wingate Boggan, a minor. Wilcox County, AL, 8 August 1847. 1p, 7 3/4 x 12 3/4 in., folds, some toning, occasional spotting, tape repair to fold. Docketing to verso. A document in which the guardianship of Wingate Boggan, grandson of Solomon Boggan (1770-ca 1847), is discussed. An additional notation at the bottom of the document references Wingate Boggan being left a "negro boy" by Solomon Boggan. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 214 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Bill of sale referencing African American enslaved woman, Eunice. Russell County, Alabama, November 1849.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Bill of sale referencing African American enslaved woman, Eunice. Russell County, Alabama, November 1849. 7 3/4 x 12 1/8 in., bifolium, creasing, few separations, some taped repair and tape remnants, foxing. Unfolded, mounted, matted and framed to 26 1/2 x 23 1/8 in. (not examined out of the frame). Undersigned and witnessed; docketed and recorded 12 April 1850 verso. Enslaver Adam Thompson sells "a certain negro woman by the name of Eunice about seventeen years old" for 650 dollars to enslaver Wiley Williams "for the sole and separate use and benefit of Sarah A Blount, wife of William Blount, as her separate estate for an during her natural life..." Accompanied by printed transcription.

Lot: 215 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript inventory of personal property and enslaved individuals from the Estate of J.P. Hunter. N.p., possibly Alabama, 1859.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript inventory of personal property and enslaved individuals from the Estate of J.P. Hunter. N.p., possibly Alabama, 1859. 5pp, 8 x 12 1/2 in. Light folds, minor wear to edges and corners. Docketed verso, 10 March 1859. Detailed "Sale Bill of the Estate of J.P. Hunter," deceased 27 January 1859. The inventory lists at least 4 enslaved females, 2 of which have children, and 1 enslaved male. Values range from $635 for "1 girl Martha" to $1,910 for "Mariah and three children." This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 216 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript will of Reuben Dodson bequeathing multiple enslaved persons to his wife and children. Tuscaloosa County, AL, 23 January 1860.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript will of Reuben Dodson bequeathing multiple enslaved persons to his wife and children. Tuscaloosa County, AL, 23 January 1860. 2pp, 9 x 14 1/2 in. folds, tape repairs to areas of separation including central horizontal fold, toning, occasional spotting/smudging. Manuscript will in which Reuben Dodson bequeaths approx. 6 enslaved persons by name to each of his children and wife. He also states, "At the decease of my wife or when she may direct the following named negroes to be sold among my children at the highest bidders. Jno. and his wife, Mariah Henrietta and Sarah, their children, and Emaline and her children, Mandy Ned and Rose to be sold on twelve months credit." South Carolina native Reuben Dodson (1804-1860) was a pastor who served at the Northport (Alabama) Baptist Church at the time that this will was drafted. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 217 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript document for hire of enslaved male subjects from Hale & Murdock Ironworks. Lamar County, AL, 1 January 1865.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript document for hire of enslaved male subjects from Hale & Murdock Ironworks. Lamar County, AL, 1 January 1865. 1p, 8 x 12 1/2 in., folds, few separations at folds, toning, some chipping to edges. Manuscript document listing enslaved male subjects for hire by Hale & Murdock Ironworks between 1863 and 1864. The male subjects are identified by color "Brn" (brown) or "Black" and price, which ranges from $140 to $300. Additional expenses for clothing, shoes, and medical bills are listed. Hale & Murdock Ironworks, located in Lamar County, AL, was the only Confederate iron furnace that wasn't destroyed during the war. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 218 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript will of Margaret Davidson bequeathing 4 identified enslaved peoples to her children. N.p., possibly Alabama or Tennessee, 25 December 1839.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript will of Margaret Davidson bequeathing 4 identified enslaved peoples to her children. N.p., possibly Alabama or Tennessee, 25 December 1839. 1 1/2 pages, 8 x 10 in., bifolium, folds, toning and occasional spotting, light chipping, few tape repairs. Docketing to terminal leaf. Manuscript will and testament of Margaret Davidson in which she wills and bequeaths enslaved peoples to her son and daughter, including: "...my Negroe Woman Celia and all her children and my Negroe Man Ephraim and my Negroe Woman Sina and her Children to be disposed of" at the death of her son Samuel W. Davidson. A "negroe boy William" is also bequeathed to her daughter, Mary Crawford. The consignor relates that the document comes from an old Southern collection. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 219 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript inventory and account of the sales of the estate of Richard C. Suttle, referencing 41 enslaved persons. Pulaski, TN, 1858.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript inventory and account of the sales of the estate of Richard C. Suttle, referencing 41 enslaved persons. Pulaski, TN, 1858. 5pp, 9 1/2 x 15 1/2 in., folds, toning, soiling, residue, some dampstaining, creasing and chipping to edges. Docketing to terminal leaf. Detailed inventory and account of sales of the Estate of Richard C. Suttle, who owned over 700 acres and over 40 enslaved persons. Page 5 includes 41 enslaved persons listed by name and age under "Additional Inventory." The ages of the enslaved individuals range from 6 months to 93-years-old. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 220 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 4 estate documents listing individual enslaved persons, most by name. [Lincoln County, KY], 1809-1830.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 4 estate documents listing individual enslaved persons, most by name. [Lincoln County, KY], 1809-1830. Manuscript appraisement document for the estate of Samuel Dejarnett[e?] Lincoln County, KY, 16 May 1809. 1 1/2 pages, 7 7/8 x 12 7/8 in. (creasing, toning, some separations repaired with tape). Later docketing to verso. Appraisal identifies three enslaved persons by name, including "one negro boy named Jerry" and "one negro woman named Delse & child called Solomon." Manuscript sale bill for the estate of David Cooke. Lincoln County, KY, January 1825. 3 1/4 pages, 7 3/4 x 12 1/2 in. (creasing, significant horizontal separation throughout repaired with tape, chipping to edges). A total of five enslaved persons are recorded by name, though they are listed in various places throughout the bill. They include "one boy named Cary," sold to Loftus Cooke for 51 dollars, "one Boy named Martin," sold to David Cooke for 51 dollars, 'one boy named Moses," sold to Reuben Pigg for 50 dollars, "one boy named Ben," sold to Jonas Older for 20 dollars, and a "girl named Maria," sold to Jessie Fish for 12 dollars. Manuscript appraisement document for the estate of John Givens. N.p., 1830. 1 1/2 pages, 7 7/8 x 6 1/8 in. (creasing, dampstaining, chipping, tearing). Docketing to verso. Seven enslaved persons are identified by name, including Jack, Fanny, Sukey, Mariah, Phill, Lucinda, and Charlotte. Manuscript sale bill for the estate of George Harris. 10 March 1826. 3 1/2 pages, 7 3/4 x 12 1/4 in. (creases, separations, loss, chipping, staining throughout). Eight enslaved persons are recorded, albeit in different ways. Document seems to indicate that "Biddy & 3 childering [sic]," also referred to as "the 4 negros" were sold to Moses Harris for one dollar. Silvy was sold to Jordan Middleton, Edmund was sold to Isaac Middleton, Caty was sold to Moses Harris, and Chapman was sold to John Owsley. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 221 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript bill of sale for an 18-year-old enslaved woman named "Harriet." Giles County, Tennessee. 10 October 1840.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript bill of sale for an 18-year-old enslaved woman named "Harriet." Giles County, Tennessee. 10 October 1840. 1p, 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. (top corners adhered to blue cardstock backing, approx. 1 in. tear along vertical fold at top edge line, small tear upper left corner, typed dealer description adhered at base of page). Wiley Huff and his wife Sarah McCallum Huff acknowledge the receipt of payment from James and Neill McCallum, Executors of the Estate of Daniel McCallum Deceased (Father of the said Sarah)," in the form of property including "one negro woman a slave for life named Harriet aged about Eighteen years - valued at four hundred and fifty dollars...." Enslaver Wiley Huff (1816-1854) married Sarah McCallum (1816-1841) on 25 June 1840. Harriet appears to have been gifted to the couple from Sarah's brothers as a wedding gift, along with "one bed and clothing, saddle and bridle...and one trunk...." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 222 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A collection of 4 documents related to the arrest and trial of enslaved men "Stephen" and "Jim," who were convicted of stealing. Lincoln County, KY. 1815.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A collection of 4 documents related to the arrest and trial of enslaved men "Stephen" and "Jim," who were convicted of stealing. Lincoln County, KY. 1815. Arrest warrant for enslaved men "Jim" and "Stephen," "two negro men slaves the property of James Logan," who are accused of breaking into Edward L. Birmingham's grocery and stealing hats. 8 April 1815. Lincoln County, Kentucky. 1p, 8 x 12 in. (creasing, small loss bottom left edge line, toning). Docketed on verso. Manuscript indenture pledging payment of $100 each to the Commonwealth of Kentucky from Edward L. Birmingham, John Birmingham, and Stephen Brown "to be Void on their personally appearing at the next county court holden for the County of Lincoln To give evidence in prosecution The Commonwealth against two negro slaves Jim & Stephen...." [Lincoln County, KY].1p, 7 1/2 x 12 1/2 in. (creasing, toning, adhesive repair at center fold). Arrest warrant for enslaved man "Jim," the "property of James Logan," demanding his appearance before the Justices of the County Court of Lincoln County, Kentucky. 10 April 1815. 1p, 8 x 6 1/2 in. (toning, scattered spotting). Docketed on verso. Legal statement submitted by John Green attorney for the Commonwealth of Kentucky in its case against "Jim & Stephen" asserting that on the 22nd of March 1815 and again thereafter the enslaved men broke into Edward L. Birmingham's "grocery shop" and stole hats and other items. [Lincoln County, KY]. 4pp, 8 x 12 1/2 in. (creasing, toning, adhesive repair at center folds). Signed "John Green" below which appears a handwritten notation "We of the jury find the within named prisoners guilty of stealing the goods within mentioned as is within charged ... and find in consequence thereof that each of them receive twenty fives lashes on his bare back." Docketed on verso. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 223 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 6 estate documents listing individual enslaved persons, most by name. Bourbon County, KY, 1815-1829.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 6 estate documents listing individual enslaved persons, most by name. Bourbon County, KY, 1815-1829. Manuscript appraisement document for the "slaves & Personal Estate of Martha McConnell." Bourbon County, KY, April 1814. 3 1/4 pages, 7 3/4 x 12 7/8 in. (creasing, separations to creases, staining, ink fading). Docketed verso. Nine enslaved persons are listed at the beginning of the document, including "1 Negroe Winch named Lucy," "1 ditto named Sarah & young child," "1 young ditto named Milley," "1 ditto named Mary," "1 Negroe Boy named Charles," "1 Girl named Cinthy," "1 Boy named Ned," and "1 Ditto named David." Manuscript inventory of the estate of Serrat Dickerson (also spelled Dickinson). Bourbon County, KY, 1 November 1815. 3 1/4 pages, 8 x 10 in. (creased, 5 1/2 in. tear to back page, other lesser separations at creases and chipping to edges, discoloration). Docketed verso. Seven enslaved persons are listed by name, including a man named George, a boy named Sam, a woman named Phillis, a woman named Hess, a woman named Keria[?], a boy named Ius[?], and a boy named Len. Manuscript inventory of the property of Elizabeth Kiplinger. Bourbon County, KY, 2 February 1829. One page, 7 3/4 x 13 in. (creasing, few stains, wear to edges and corners). Docketed verso. An enslaved young girl named Malinda is recorded as being "about five years old, valued at...$168.00 / not hired out because she is too young." And 3 other manuscript estate documents from Bourbon County, KY including an appraisement of the estate of Samuel Scott (1815), an appraisement of the "slaves & personal Estate of Ann Clark" (1814), and an "Inventory of the Propert[y] of Margret [sic] Coil" (1828). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 224 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Estate inventory document listing 37 enslaved persons, most with names and ages recorded, including 7 who have "sued for their freedom." Bourbon County, KY, 12 September 1823.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Estate inventory document listing 37 enslaved persons, most with names and ages recorded, including 7 who have "sued for their freedom." Bourbon County, KY, 12 September 1823. 7 pages, 7 3/4 x 12 1/4 in. String-bound manuscript document (creasing, some separations at creases including back page fully separated along horizontal crease, few chips to edges and corners, toning). Inventory and appraisement of the personal estate of Benjamin Hallack of Bourbon County, KY pursuant to an order of the county court at their May term, 1823. Docketed verso and recorded June 2024. 37 enslaved persons appear in this inventory, 29 of whom are listed under the names of various beneficiaries; one of whom is listed separately, to be sold; and 7 of whom are listed separately still, having sued for their freedom. A 19-year-old enslaved woman named Lucinda, along with her infant child, is given a value of 450 dollars. Among the 7 persons having sued for freedom are 30-year-old Amy, 16-year-old Delia, 11-year-old Charles, 9-year-old Eliza, 7-year-old Killy, 4-year-old Lubis, and 2-year-old Washington, collectively listed as being worth 1,750 dollars. In the Federal Census of 1810, Benjamin Hallack (1765-1823) is recorded as enslaving 16 persons in Stoner, Bourbon County, KY. By the time of the 1820 census, that number had grown to 21. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 225 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Bill of appraisement of the estate of Revolutionary War soldier Moses Endicott, listing two enslaved persons. Bourbon County, KY, 19 May 1834.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Bill of appraisement of the estate of Revolutionary War soldier Moses Endicott, listing two enslaved persons. Bourbon County, KY, 19 May 1834. 3pp, 7 1/2 x 12 1/4 in., bifolium, folds, toning, occasional spotting, some creasing. Docketing to terminal leaf. The bill of appraisement lists two enslaved persons and their values, including "Stephen"...."to serve until the 5th day of September 1837," value $160, and "Jinny"..."25 years of age to serve for life," value $350. Moses Endicott (1759-1834) was a member of the North Carolina militia and fought from 1778-1781 in the southern theater of operations. He settled with his family in Bourbon County, KY, where he and his brothers built a church in 1790 called the Endicott Meeting House. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 226 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 6 estate documents listing individual enslaved persons, most by name. [Bourbon County, KY]. 1831-1861.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 6 estate documents listing individual enslaved persons, most by name. [Bourbon County, KY]. 1831-1861. Manuscript appraisement document for the estate of Presley Talbot. N.p., 19 March 1831. 1 1/2 pages, 7 3/4 x 12 1/4 in. (creasing, staining, some tears and wear to edges). "One Negro Woman & 2 children" are listed with an accompanying value of 575 dollars. Manuscript inventory and sale document for the estate of French Simpson. Bourbon County, KY, 6 September 1847. 6 1/2 staple-bound pages, 7 3/4 x 6 1/4 in. (creasing, ink staining). Docketed verso. Three enslaved persons are listed as being hired out, including Lowery, Davy, and Nelly. Lowery is listed again as having been sold for 500 dollars along with a girl named Mary for 350 dollars. Manuscript inventory and appraisement document for the personal estate of Thomas Fischer (also spelled Fisher). Bourbon County, KY, 13 February 1852. One page, 8 x 12 1/2 in. (creasing, few tears, discoloration). Docketing to verso. Eight enslaved persons are listed by name (except for an infant and toddler) along with their ages. Manuscript sale bill document for the personal estate of William Collins. Bourbon County, KY, 4 December 1854. 3 1/2 pages, 7 1/2 x 11 3/4 in. (creasing, some ink fading). Docketed verso. Five enslaved persons are listed, including an unnamed "Negro woman," sold to William Clark, two boys named John and Sil, sold to James Thomas, a boy named Moris, sold to J. S. Crouch, and a girl named Lucy, sold to John Johnson. And 2 additional manuscript estate documents including an appraisement document for the estate of James M. Crose of Bourbon County, KY, and a document outlining the division of enslaved persons from the estate of James b. Collins. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 227 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. 2 estate documents listing enslaved persons, each with name and age included. Bourbon County, KY, 1833, 1854.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. 2 estate documents listing enslaved persons, each with name and age included. Bourbon County, KY, 1833, 1854. Manuscript appraisement document for the estate of James McClure. Bourbon County, KY, September 1833. 3 1/4 pages, 7 3/4 x 9 3/4 in. (creasing, dampstaining, ink smudging). Docketed verso. Long list of assets includes 11 enslaved persons listed among physical property without subheading or separation. Individuals include Christopher [2]2 years old; Demus, 22 years old; Wesley, 18 years old; Washington, 12 years old; Sam, 30 years old, Jefferson, 10 years old, Dudley, 7 years old; Dorcus, 4 years old; Charlott (no age listed); Rachael, 4 years old; and Ann, 2 years old. Manuscript appraisement document for the estate of William Collins. Bourbon County, KY, 10 October 1854. 2 pages, 7 1/2 x 12 3/8 in. (creasing, spots of discoloration, ink bleeding, few minor separations). Docketed verso. Near the end of a list of assets including notes owed and physical property, 5 enslaved persons are listed by name and age. Individuals include Bith, about 31 years old; John, about 6 years old; Sil, about 4 years old; Morris, about 2 years old; and Suce, about 9 years old. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 228 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. 2 Kentucky estate documents listing individual enslaved persons valued at zero dollars or "worthless." 1825, 1864.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. 2 Kentucky estate documents listing individual enslaved persons valued at zero dollars or "worthless." 1825, 1864. Manuscript appraisement document for the estate of Jonathan Massie. Bourbon County, KY, 7 March 1864. 3 pages, 7 3/4 x 12 1/8 in. (creasing along old folds, toning). Revenue stamp to first page. Cash, notes, and physical assets are listed along with values. Under the subheading "Negroes," 2 enslaved persons are listed, including "Negro man Pomp" with a listed value of 300 dollars, and "Negro woman Mariah" with a listed value of "Worthless." Manuscript appraisement document for the estate of George Givens. Lincoln County, KY, 9 July 1825. 1 1/3 pages, 6 1/8 x 7 1/2 in. (creasing along old folds). A short list of assets includes 3 enslaved persons, including a man named Jacob with a listed value of 400 dollars, a man named Gabriel with a listed value of 225 dollars, and a man named Jack with a listed value of zero dollars. It is likely that an infirmity or greatly advanced age caused the value of both Mariah and Jack to be listed as such. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 229 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. 2 documents from Madison County, KY, referencing enslaved persons. 1850s.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. 2 documents from Madison County, KY, referencing enslaved persons. 1850s. Manuscript list of over 100 items sold from the estate and plantation of Leah Parish, Madison County, KY, 13 October 1857. 4pp, 7 1/2 x 12 in., bifolium, docketing to terminal leaf (folds, some toning near folds, occasional soiling/smudging). Much of the property and goods, which includes quilts, beds, tools, tables, chairs, and other objects, are valued at less than $1 with the exception of a handful of items. Page 3 lists an enslaved person by the name of "Jurry" who has been sold for $611. Buyer listed next to items purchased. Manuscript settlement document for the estate of Martin Turner, Madison County, KY, 11 December 1851. 3pp, 7 3/4 x 12 1/2 in., bifolium, docketing to terminal leaf (folds, tape repairs to areas of separation at folds, toning, occasional smudging). The document lists collected amounts with individuals, including "negroes for hire" and "negroes sold." Together, 2 documents. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 230 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript document recording land rental, hiring of enslaved persons, and sale of the personal property from the estate of Nancy Bassett. Madison County, KY, 5 March 1856.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript document recording land rental, hiring of enslaved persons, and sale of the personal property from the estate of Nancy Bassett. Madison County, KY, 5 March 1856. 3pp, 7 1/2 x 12 1/2 in. bifolium, folds, some toning to folds, occasional spotting. Docketing to terminal leaf. Page 3 lists 25 enslaved persons by name, their cost, as well as the first and last names of those who rented them. The inventory also lists various household goods and plantation equipment. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 231 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 6 estate documents listing individual enslaved persons, most by name. Ca 1830-1858.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 6 estate documents listing individual enslaved persons, most by name. Ca 1830-1858. Manuscript "Schedule an appraisement bill of the personal Estate of Benjamin French Deceased shown to us by William Leisur[e] his administrator this 30th of March 1830." Lincoln County, Kentucky. 30 March 1830. 2pp, 7 3/4 x 12 in. (creasing, toning). Appraisal identifies six enslaved persons by name and age, including "Negro man Ephraim" age 32, "girl Mariah" age 13, "Negro James" age 7, "Negro woman Biddy [sp?]" age 43, "Negro Joseph" age 15, and "Negro boy Barnett" age 11. Manuscript receipt indicating a payment to George Williams, a portion of which was made "for a negro girl @ $664" and the balance in cash, being a portion of his interest in the estate of R. Smith deceased. N.p. [Kentucky?], 17 August 1839. 1p, 7 1/2 x 4 in. (toning, creasing, chipping at edges). Manuscript estate accounting including division and disposition of enslaved persons from the estate of Josiah Caldwell deceased. Lincoln County, Kentucky. 13 February 1850. 4pp, 7 3/4 x 12 1/2 in. (creasing, toning). Document identifies "Two negroes Janet & Giorga" who "by the will are given to the children of Phebe Duncan." Manuscript "certificate" signed by John G. Pond indicating he did consent to the sale of a "Negro boy Jeff to H. Yates for $500 in the summer of 1832." Boyle County, Kentucky. 13 May 1850. 1p, 7 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. (creasing). Manuscript bill of sale documenting a $15 payment for "a negro man Slave named Armsted about 60 years of age." N.p. [Kentucky?], 6 December 1858. 1p, 7 1/2 x 10 in. (creasing, chipping at edges). [With:] Partial manuscript document recording the sale of a "negro man named Bill Pease" by William G. Bender to E. A. Goodwin for $850. Marion County, Mississippi. 27 November 1851. 1p, approx. 8 x 10 in. (two large losses to right side, dampstaining). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 232 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript petition concerning the estate of James Ricks, which includes property and enslaved persons. Calhoun County, AR, February 1860.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript petition concerning the estate of James Ricks, which includes property and enslaved persons. Calhoun County, AR, February 1860. 2pp, 8 x 13 in., bifolium. Creased along old folds, toning along creases and edges, minor wear to edges and corners). Docketing to terminal leaf. Concerns enslaved persons, cotton bales, and the farm of descendant. States that "it would be the best interest of estate to keep the slaves and property together." And that "there was about three bales of cotton made on the place last year." A statement on the second page provides the sworn opinion of J. B. McCulloch and J. R. Caulder, whose relation to the estate is unknown, that "the interest of the Estate...would be promoted by...working the slaves." This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 233 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript legal complaint related to the hire of "the negro girl Ellen." Amite County, Mississippi. 4 April 1835.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript legal complaint related to the hire of "the negro girl Ellen." Amite County, Mississippi. 4 April 1835. 1p, 8 x 12 1/4 in. (creasing, separation at center fold, light soil). Docketed on verso. Complaint brought to the Circuit Court of Amite County by Elizabeth Browne and William H. Dillingham asserting that Hardin D. Moore and Robert Stewart had promised to pay $55 "for the hire of the negro girl Ellen...and to furnish said girl with three suits of clothes one pair of shoes one blanket and pay her tax for the year," but despite multiple requests for payment the defendants have "wholly refused" to comply with the agreement. Though born and educated in Maine and Massachusetts, by 1825 William H. Dillingham (1798-1857) had removed to Amite County, Mississippi, where he served as an administrator/attorney dealing with the estates of the deceased, including enslavers. The 1830 U.S. Federal Census does not indicate that Dillingham enslaved any persons, but by 1850 the U.S. Slave Schedule indicates he enslaved a fifty-year-old man and a fifty year-old woman. The hiring out of the "negro girl Ellen" exemplifies a system of contracting enslaved labor, which at times proved more profitable to enslavers than having an enslaved person working on his/her own property. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 234 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. 2 documents from Lafayette County, MS, incl. an 1842 inventory listing one enslaved young female subject and an 1854 land deed referencing the Chickasaw Cession.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. 2 documents from Lafayette County, MS, incl. an 1842 inventory listing one enslaved young female subject and an 1854 land deed referencing the Chickasaw Cession. Manuscript inventory of the property received from Richard Barry. Lafayette County, MS, December 1842. 1p, 8 x 9 in. (folds, toning near folds, edge wear). Docketing to verso. Included in the inventory is "One Negro Girl 9 years old named Charlotte $350." Additional entries include a gray mare, cow and calf, sow and pigs, knives, and furniture. Signed by A.A. Houston and M.E. Houston. [With:] Manuscript land indenture between B.F. Houston and A.A. Houston with a reference to the Chickasaw Cession. Lafayette County, MS, 1 March 1854. 1p, 7 3/4 x 12 1/2 in. (folds, toning near folds, occasional spotting, light edge wear). Docketing to verso. Signed by B.F. Houston, who later served with the Confederate army. He enlisted as a private with the 34th Mississippi Volunteers, was advanced to colonel at the Battle of Perryville, KY, and eventually became a captain. Together, 2 manuscript documents. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 235 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript document from Scott Thompson to Ida S. Outlaw regarding the hiring of 7 enslaved persons "which were hired to the highest bidder of Brooksville." Noxubee County, MS, 1 January 1864.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript document from Scott Thompson to Ida S. Outlaw regarding the hiring of 7 enslaved persons "which were hired to the highest bidder of Brooksville." Noxubee County, MS, 1 January 1864. 4 pages, 8 1/4 x 10 1/2 in., bifolium, folds, toning, few smudges, creasing and some chipping to edges. Manuscript document submitted to the "Hon. Probate Judge" by Scott Thompson, "Guardian," to Ida S. Outlaw..."To the hire of the following negroes which were hired to the highest bidder at Brooksville this day..." Seven enslaved persons are listed by name and amount below. Pages 3 and 4 contain a list of expenses, including entries for "12 pounds of meat furnished the negroes during Christmas week," and "644 pounds Bacon furnished old Mary, the negro who takes care of the little negroes." Brooksville, Mississippi, was the former location of the "Thompson House" and cotton plantation. The house, which was demolished in 2016, was known as the scene of brutal family murders that occurred on 4 December 1865. The document includes multiple references to "Scott Thompson," suggesting that it may have a connection with the Thompson House and plantation. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 236 - [LOUISIANA]. Manuscript document related to "Mr. Simon," a "homme de couleur libre," or French-speaking free person of color. St. Martin Parish, Louisiana. 1 May 1834.

[LOUISIANA]. Manuscript document related to "Mr. Simon," a "homme de couleur libre," or French-speaking free person of color. St. Martin Parish, Louisiana. 1 May 1834. In French with English notation at left margin. 1p, 7 3/4 x 9 1/2 in. (small tears, light pencil notation at top margin, creasing). Docketed on verso. In consideration of the amount paid by Mr. Simon, "(alias Simon Masie), homme de couleur libre," the undersigned cedes to him rights over land in Saint Martin Parish, Louisiana. Note in margin indicates that the transfer was recorded in the office of the Judge of the Parish of St. Martin on 1 May 1834. Free people of color formed a distinctive segment of Louisiana's population, and by the mid-nineteenth century the state had the largest number of free Black people in the Deep South, as well as some of the wealthiest. Though the majority of free people of color resided in New Orleans, other areas, including St. Martin Parish, were known for having large communities of "homme de couleur libre" or "gens de couleur libres." Among the privileges allowed to free people of color was property ownership - something denied to enslaved people of African descent. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 237 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Partly printed document recording the sale of a named enslaved female subject from Georgia to William P. Montgomery of Mississippi. New Orleans, LA, 18 February 1856.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Partly printed document recording the sale of a named enslaved female subject from Georgia to William P. Montgomery of Mississippi. New Orleans, LA, 18 February 1856. 3pp, 8 1/2 x 13 3/4 in., bifolium, folds, light soiling, few smudges, creasing and some chipping to edges, adhesive repair to horizontal tear to right edge of page 1. Docketing to terminal leaf. Partly printed document recording the sale of an enslaved young woman identified as a "slave for life named 'Roda' aged about fifteen years" from John W. Gordon of Montgomery, AL, to William P. Montgomery of Washington County, MS, for $1,050. The document notes that the enslaved woman was "imported...from the state of Georgia," and is "...fully guaranteed against the redhibitory vices, maladies and defects prescribed by law." Research indicates that William P. Montgomery lived in Natchez, MS, and later moved to Greenville, MS, where he built "Locust" Plantation. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 238 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. "Agreement of Registry" regarding the lease of lands and employment of "freedmen" at the Good Hope Plantation in Vidalia, LA. United States Rental and Plantation Office, District of Natchez. 23 February 1865.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. "Agreement of Registry" regarding the lease of lands and employment of "freedmen" at the Good Hope Plantation in Vidalia, LA. United States Rental and Plantation Office, District of Natchez. 23 February 1865. Party printed document, 1p, 8 3/4 x 14 in. (adhesive repair, creasing at folds, light soil). Signed by J.F. Richardson as Assistant Special Agent of the Treasury Department and by lessees "Waters & Klapp," and "Approved as being within Military Supervision" by Union Brigadier General John Wynn Davidson ("J.W. Davidson") at Head Quarters, District of Natchez, 26 February 1865. Document bordered by 29 internal U.S. tax stamps, each initialed and dated "W & K / Mch 8/65" in ink. Bottom left with embossed stamp of "United States Rental and Plantation Office / District of Natchez." Lessees Waters & Klapp register their plantation in an agreement "concerning abandoned and confiscable lands and the employment and general welfare of Freedmen." The plantation "known as the Good Hope Plantation, situated in the Parish of Concordia in the State of La owned by L.R. Marshall leased by him to Waters & Klapp containing (1200) Twelve Hundred acres all under cultivation Said plantation is situated six miles from Vidalia La on Lake Concordia." Government lessees George Gillson Klapp (1839-1916) of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and James D. Waters (1832-1892) jointly leased Good Hope plantation, as well as Hermitage plantation, from Levin R. Marshall (1800-1870) during 1865 and 1866. Marshall was a prominent Natchez banker and planter whose holdings included five plantations in Mississippi and Louisiana which spanned more than 14,000 acres and another 10,000 acres in Arkansas. The 1860 U.S. Federal Slave Schedule indicates that Marshall enslaved more than 200 men, women, and children in Louisiana alone. His Louisiana plantations, under Union control in 1865, were leased as part of a Federal program which sought to employ freedmen on plantations as free workers - a first step for many formerly enslaved persons towards their own economic and personal freedom. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 239 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript bill of sale for a 7-year-old enslaved girl named Caroline. 21 October 1840.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript bill of sale for a 7-year-old enslaved girl named Caroline. 21 October 1840. 8 3/8 x 5 3/8 in., creased, with some small separations and discoloration. Docketed verso. "Received of James K Garrett Three Hundred & Fifty Dollars in Full Payment For a Negro Girl by the name of Caroline about seven years of age. & I also warent [sic] The Title from all other persons so claiming[?] & warrant sad [sic] negro to be sound both in Boddy [sic] & mind Oct 21st 1840. Test J [?] Garrett. Amelia X Carter (seal) her mark."

Lot: 240 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 2 legal documents related to cases involving enslaved persons.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 2 legal documents related to cases involving enslaved persons. Manuscript legal document related to the management and disposition of the estate of Captain John Orndorff (1781-1848). Logan Circuit Court, Logan County, [Kentucky]. Ca 1849-1850. 16pp, 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. (creasing, toning). Document outlines a legal dispute among Captain John Orndorff's immediate and extended family members over his estate, the validity of his will, and the care of Orondorff's sole child, with extensive discussion of enslaved persons. Defendant Thomas Gooch answers to the court that he was reluctantly appointed as guardian to Orndorff's only heir, Lorenda Orndorff, and describes his efforts to effect his duties. His statement also suggests there was a conspiracy among Orondorff's enslaved laborers to secure their freedom, writing in small part: "previous to these proceedings a most diabolical attempt, of which he [Gooch]had been fully informed, had been made by one of the slaves of sd John Orndorff prospectively emancipated by the scout clause in his will, and acting at the instance & suggestion of others of slaves to take the life of his infant ward by throwing her in a large reservoir of water. That he had thoroughly investigated this matter - and his investigations resulted in a thorough conviction that a deep & terrible conspiracy had been formed by the slaves of sd Orondorff, whose freedom depended on the death of his ward ... before she should attain twenty one years of age...." The 1840 U.S. Federal Census indicates that Orndorff enslaved 19 men, women, and children. [With:] Manuscript legal document for the case Taylor v. Taylor, listing interrogatories associated with multiple plantations, freedom seekers, and the ownership of enslaved persons from the estate of Col. John Taylor. 3pp, 8 1/4 x 13 in. Docketed on verso. One interrogatory states: "state whether a negro named Stafford was not one of the negroes give by Col. J. Taylor to John C. Taylor. Was he a runaway & did not Col. J. Taylor after he had run away get possession of him and sell him or have him sold?...Was the wife of Stafford one of the said negroes? Was she not very feeble when he got her and not more than half a hand?" This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 241 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 3 manuscript documents related to enslaved persons, comprising:

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 3 manuscript documents related to enslaved persons, comprising: Manuscript receipt for "one negro boy named Lewis valued at six hundred & seventy five dollars...." N.p., 27 April 1834. 1p, 8 x 3 1/4 in. (creasing, toning). Manuscript "sale bill of the estate of Matthew Hunter Decd" listing "a Negro woman Sill" valued at $150. South Carolina, 1835. 2pp, 8 x 6 in. (creasing, toning, small tear bottom edge line). [With:] Manuscript legal document related to the partitioning of the estate of Mrs. Lirzah P. Brown in April 1864, and noting that William H. Green, a minor, was gifted $12,400 of "negro property." Lancaster Court House, County of Lancaster, South Carolina. 20 October 1870. 1p, 12.5 x in. (creasing, toning). This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 242 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript inventory and appraisement document listing over 80 enslaved persons at L'Esperance Plantation. N.p., 17 January 1859.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Manuscript inventory and appraisement document listing over 80 enslaved persons at L'Esperance Plantation. N.p., 17 January 1859. "Inventory & appraisement of Negroes, in families, on the 'L'Esperance' plantation." 4pp, 8 x 10 in. (creasing, occasional tears at folds, toning). Enslaved persons listed in family groups when applicable, sometimes including first names and surnames. Additional information such as age, assessed value, and "crippled" or "unsound" indicated. Signed "Thos. Neal" and "N.C. Weems." No location is specified on the document. Several plantations bearing the name "Esperance" were identified, including in Caldwell and St. James Parishes, Louisiana. A "L'Esperance Plantation" was located in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 243 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 13 Cuban manumission documents, 1844-1873.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 13 Cuban manumission documents, 1844-1873. Disbound ledger pages recording legal events in Cuba, 8 1/2 x 12 3/8 in., (removed from ledger, chipping to edges, ink bleeding, dampstaining). All but one dated 1873 (one dated 1844), with stamped official seals. Documents record the liberation (or attempted liberation) of several individuals from enslavement, including a 15-year-old Creole girl named Lucia, a 41-year-old African woman named Catalina, a 21-year-old Creole man named Lorenzo, a 7-year-old Creole boy named Luis, and others. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 244 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 12 documents regarding the sale of enslaved persons in Cuba. 1844-1873.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 12 documents regarding the sale of enslaved persons in Cuba. 1844-1873. Disbound ledger pages recording legal events in Cuba, 8 1/2 x 12 5/8 in., (removed from ledger, chipping/loss to edges and corners, ink bleeding, dampstaining). Dated from 1844-1873, with official seals. Documents record the sale of several enslaved persons, including a 20-year-old woman named Petronila described as being a Creole mulatto, a black 5-year-old named Eulogio Amado, a Creole man named Laureano, a 35-year-old woman named Estefania being sold by a commercial enterprise called "Brooks & Co," and others. One document, dated 30 December 1870, records the sale of 12 enslaved persons including a 43-year-old man named Roberto, a 40-year-old woman named Cecilia, a 45-year-old woman named Carolina, a 47-year-old woman named Roselana, a 26-year-old woman named Ines, a 35-year-old woman named Josefina, a 50-year-old man named Valentin, a 40-year-old woman named Fortunata, a 4-year-old woman named Rafaela, a 6-year-old child named Pascal, a 3-year-old child named Joaquin, and a 4-year-old child named Cecilia. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 245 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 29 assorted Cuban documents, some involving enslaved persons. Ca 1860s-1880s.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 29 assorted Cuban documents, some involving enslaved persons. Ca 1860s-1880s. Mostly manuscript document recording legal and/or military proceedings in Cuba, ranging in size from 6 x 8 3/8 in. to 8 1/2 x 12 1/2 in., many bifolium (dampstaining, foxing, chipping, toning throughout). Most bearing stamped official seals. Documents cover a variety of topics. Highlights include: One page manuscript document requesting the registration of a group of enslaved persons for passage with a Mr. Juan Hernandez, who will be going on an expedition. 23 February 1876. The listed enslaved persons include Juan (40 years old), Manuel (listed as "Congo," 27 years old), Julian (40 years old), Calisto (48 years old), Fran[cis]co (17 years old), Eulogio (16 years old), Hermenegildo (27 years old), Bibian (35 years old), Ruperto (26 years old), Serafin (38 years old), Andres (listed as "Congo," 47 years old), and Juan (47 years old). -- One page manuscript document recording a legal proceeding in which a free dark-haired (or dark-skinned) woman represents her parents, Josefa and Sadeo, who are dark-haired (or dark-skinned) Congolese people, both in their sixties. It is unclear exactly what the daughter is requesting, but it likely has to do with their being brought to Cuba and/or their freedom. Matanzas, Cuba, 19 June 1884. Numerous stamped seals. -- One page manuscript death certificate for a 22-year-old Black woman named Clara, who succumbed to cholera. [Havana?], Cuba, July 1868. -- 2 page manuscript document recording the escape of a dark-skinned woman named Margarita from a hospital. 26 January 1881. -- And several others.

Lot: 246 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Anti-slavery "Am I Not a Man and a Brother?" token.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Anti-slavery "Am I Not a Man and a Brother?" token. N.p., n.d., ca late 18th century. approx. 32 mm metal token (light wear). Obverse inscribed "Am I Not a Man and a Brother," above a supplicant kneeling enslaved man in chains originally designed by the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade and popularized by Josiah Wedgwood when he used it on his abolitionist Jasperware cameo medallions produced in the late 18th century. The image and phrase became popular among abolitionists including the American Anti-Slavery Society. Reverse inscribed "Whatsoever Ye Would That Men Should Do To You, Do Ye Even So To Them." Possibly struck for The Society for the Suppression of the African Slave Trade, which was founded in London in 1787. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 247 - CLARKSON, Thomas (1760-1846). An Essay on the Slavery and Commerce of the Human Species, Particularly the African. In Three Parts. Georgetown, K[Y]: J. N. Lytle for Rev. David Barrow, 1816.

CLARKSON, Thomas (1760-1846). An Essay on the Slavery and Commerce of the Human Species, Particularly the African. In Three Parts. Georgetown, K[Y]: J. N. Lytle for Rev. David Barrow, 1816. 18mo (104 x 169 mm). (Some staining, spotting, and minor marginal chipping.) Contemporary sheep (some wear, hinges starting). Provenance: Helen Love Van Rensselaer (signature). Early Kentucky imprint of a rare anti-slavery tract. [With:] BOURNE, George. Picture of Slavery in the United States of America. Middletown, CT: Edwin Hunt, 1834. 18mo (97 x 151 mm). (Some staining and light marginal chipping.) 11 black and white illustrations. Contemporary red cloth, printed paper spine label (some wear and staining, hinges starting). Thorough, illustrated revelation of the evils of enslavement. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 248 - [ENSLAVEMENT - LITERATURE]. DE DURAS, Claire. Ourika. Early printings published in France and Germany in 1824.

[ENSLAVEMENT - LITERATURE]. DE DURAS, Claire. Ourika. Early printings published in France and Germany in 1824. DE DURAS, Claire. Ourika. Berlin: Librairie de Duncker et Humblot, 1824. 16mo (4 1/4 x 6 3/4), 112pp, paper wrappers (toning overall with some stains to the cover, splits and flaking at the edges). Published just one year prior, Ourika is a fictionalized account of the life of a woman who was purchased as a young child by the Chevalier de Boufflers, the administrator of Senegal, and raised by the affluent de Beveau family. Credited as the first French text to depict a Black character with complex motivations and intellect, the novel takes place amidst the backdrop of the French Revolution, and challenged conventional perceptions of race in France in particular and Europe more generally. MELESVILLE and CARMOUCHE. Ourika, ou La Petite Negresse, Drame en un Acte. Paris: Chez Quoy, 1824. 8vo (5 x 8 in.), 31pp, paper wrappers (toning, with some staining and chipping to edges, penciled notations on front wrapper), Published just one year after the novel's original release, the play in a single act demonstrates the immediate cultural impact that the novel had. Though now more than two-hundred years old, Ourika's story still resonates with audiences today through its depiction of an intelligent and passionate main character prevented from achieving her goals and desires as a result of a characteristic she cannot hide or control. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 249 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION - BUSINESS]. ELDRIDGE, Elleanor (ca 1785 - ca 1845). Memoirs of Elleanor Eldridge. Providence, RI: B.T. Albro, 1840.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION - BUSINESS]. ELDRIDGE, Elleanor (ca 1785 - ca 1845). Memoirs of Elleanor Eldridge. Providence, RI: B.T. Albro, 1840. 24mo (4 x 5 1/2 in.), 128pp. Illustrated with a frontispiece engraving of the author (interior toned, occasional spotting). Original binding comprised of marbled paper-covered boards and green cloth spine, lacking spine label (edge and corner wear). Second Edition. Autobiography of Elleanor Eldridge, a free Black woman of mixed race, born in Rhode Island, the daughter of a Native American woman and an enslaved African who won his freedom by fighting in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Elleanor Eldridge earned a living doing housework. She inherited the industry of her family, eventually purchasing her own land and building a house on the property. Then, through a series of circumstances, some unavoidable (contracting a serious illness) and some the result of outright swindle, she nearly lost the house and land, but was "allowed" to buy it back at a price that kept increasing. Friends helped Eldridge publish this narrative, copies of which she sold by travelling from town to town, to pay the legal costs of recovering the property. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 250 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. [UPHAM, Mrs. T.C.]. Happy Phebe. Dublin and London: ca 1860-1861.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. [UPHAM, Mrs. T.C.]. Happy Phebe. Dublin and London: ca 1860-1861. 48mo (2 3/4 x 4 1/8 in.), 23pp. Original wrappers with a woodcut illustration of an enslaved woman on the front cover (wrappers with partial separation at central fold, interior pages detached from wrappers, edge and corner wear, occasional spotting). Later printing of a popular anti-slavery narrative regarding the life of Phebe Ann Jacobs, or "Happy Phebe," which originally appeared in a small tract published by J.S. Stewart around 1850. The first edition of Happy Phebe is considered to be one of Harriet Beecher Stowe's primary feminine sources for "Uncle Tom's Cabin." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 251 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Two 19th-century imprints, incl. anti-slavery publication The Slave's Friend and The Negro Servant.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Two 19th-century imprints, incl. anti-slavery publication The Slave's Friend and The Negro Servant. The Slave's Friend. Vol. II, No. II, Whole No. 14. New York: Anti-Slavery Office, ca 1836-1838. 32mo (2 7/8 x 4 1/8 in.) 16pp. String-bound yellow pictorial wrappers (discoloration, soiling, some misalignment; spotting to pages). One of the monthly anti-slavery publications for young readers from the Anti-Slavery Society, this work features abolitionist short stories and poetry including "God's Ravens," "The Coffle Yoke," "The Lump of Gold," "The Forgiving Slave," and others. The Negro Servant; An Authentic and Interesting Narrative of A Young Negro...The First Part. London: J. Evans and Son, ca 1809. 12mo (4 3/4 x 7 1/4 in.) Disbound, [5]-8pp. Woodcut vignette below title (pamphlet heavily worn, with holes to left edge and upper edge, chipping and loss to edges, soiling, and spotting throughout.) Extended title: "Part the First: shewing how he was made a slave in Africa, and carried to Jamaica where he was sold to a captain in His Majesty's Navy, by whom he was taken to America, where he became a Christian and was afterwards brought to England." This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 252 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. 3 works related to enslavement, comprising:

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. 3 works related to enslavement, comprising: 1) PAULDING, J. K. Slavery in the United States. NY: Harper & Brothers, 1836. Contemporary cloth, printed paper spine label. FIRST EDITION. 2) BOURNE, George. Picture of Slavery in the United States of America. Middletown, CT: Edwin Hunt, 1834. 11 black and white illustrations (complete). Contemporary cloth, printed paper spine label. 3) VAN EVRIE, J. H. White Supremacy and Negro Subordination or, Negroes a Subordinate Race, and (so-called) Slavery its Normal Condition with an Appendix, Showing the Past and resent Condition of the Countries South of Us. New York: Van Evrie, Horton & Co., 1870. Original cloth. SECOND EDITION. Together, 3 volumes, all 18mo and 16mo sizes, condition generally fair. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 253 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Circular of Information for the New England Freedmen's Aid Society. Boston, MA, 2 December 1865.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. Circular of Information for the New England Freedmen's Aid Society. Boston, MA, 2 December 1865. 4 7/8 x 7 3/4 in. printed circular (creasing, some separations, spotting). Circular explains the purpose of the Society and offers ways in which people can help to further its work. Instructions for sending packages to the Society are included, as well as a form acting as a receipt for such shipments. This one in particular is filled out to a "Miss Mary O. Hodges" who sent "2 large boxes" marked "Miss Mary R. Kimball, Roanoke Is., N.C." According to the February 1866 issue of the Freedmen's Record, Mary R. Kimball taught school at the Freedmen's Colony on Roanoke Island, NC. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 254 - [SLAVERY & ABOLITION]. You are all invited...To hear an Address in [sic] behalf of the cause of Free Soil, Free Labor, and Free Men! By John L. Swift, Esq. Boston: Commonwealth Press, 1852.

[SLAVERY & ABOLITION]. You are all invited...To hear an Address in [sic] behalf of the cause of Free Soil, Free Labor, and Free Men! By John L. Swift, Esq. Boston: Commonwealth Press, 1852. 1p, 7 3/4 x 6 in. (adhesive remnants on each edge, small loss bottom left corner, creasing, toning). Broadside extending an invitation to a 22 October 1852 meeting and speech by John Lindsay Swift (1828-1895) at the Lexington [MA] town hall. Antislavery Democrats and Whigs formed the Free Soil Party in 1848, focusing on opposition to the expansion of slavery into western territories of the United States. The party's slogan which appears on the broadside - "Free Soil, Free Labor, and Free Men!" - was coined by prominent abolitionist politician Salmon P. Chase. Abolitionist John L. Swift's engagement at the Lexington Town Hall was likely an attempt to campaign for Free Soil candidates leading up to the November 1852 presidential election. By 1854, the Free Soil Party had merged into the nascent Republican Party but Swift would remain a vocal opponent of slavery. The 2 March 1855 edition of The Liberator indicates that Swift was to speak at an "Anti-Slavery Tea Party" at Concord [MA] Town Hall. He would later enlist in the Union Army, raising Co. C of the 41st Massachusetts Infantry regiment, and ultimately rising to the rank of General. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 255 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. MAY, Samuel J. (1797-1871). Some Recollections of our Antislavery Conflict. Boston: Fields, Osgood, & Co., 1869.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. MAY, Samuel J. (1797-1871). Some Recollections of our Antislavery Conflict. Boston: Fields, Osgood, & Co., 1869. 12mo. (Loose hinge, front free end paper with short tear near top edge and chipping, light toning, text good overall.) Green cloth lettered in gilt on spine (scuffing, few areas of minor surface loss, edge and corner wear). Front free endpaper appears to be annotated and signed by the author, "See Page 300, S. J. May" (short tear near annotation, ink has undergone some fading). Following blank page with inscription, "George W. Stearns / with the kind regards of / his Uncle / Samuel May, / Now in his 93d year. / September 1869." Ink inscription in different hand below, "Albert W. Jordan / June 1920 / from / Annie C. Stearns." Samuel J. May was a Harvard-educated minister, abolitionist, and strong advocate for women's rights. He made significant literary contributions to the anti-slavery movement. Some Recollections of our Antislavery Conflict chronicles the rise of abolitionism, featuring chapters focusing on ''Prejudice Against Color,'' ''The Fugitive Slave Law,'' and ''The Underground Railroad.'' This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 256 - [ABOLITIONISTS]. JAY, John II (1817-1894). ALS ("John Jay"), to J. Dewitt Miller. Katonah, [NY], September 1877.

[ABOLITIONISTS]. JAY, John II (1817-1894). ALS ("John Jay"), to J. Dewitt Miller. Katonah, [NY], September 1877. 2 pages, 3 7/8 x 6 3/16 in., creased along old fold, few spots and ink transfers. Jay writes to Mr. J. Dewitt Miller at Cross River, [NY], in full: "I have to thank you for your note of [the 1st of September?], and to say that I will be happy to see J[?] at a meeting of the Bedford Farmers Club on Friday the 21st of September at 2 o'clock to be held at the Jay Farm." This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 257 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 11 items related to abolitionists including William Lloyd GARRISON, Wendell PHILLIPS, Gerrit SMITH, and Henry Ward BEECHER.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of 11 items related to abolitionists including William Lloyd GARRISON, Wendell PHILLIPS, Gerrit SMITH, and Henry Ward BEECHER. SMITH, Gerrit (1797-1874). Autograph letter signed ("Gerrit Smith"). Peterboro [New York], 22 December 1840. Smith writes regarding corrections to deeds. 1p, 5 x 7 in. (creasing, toning). PHILLIPS, Wendell (1811-1884). A group of 3 autograph quotations signed: "Peace, if possible / Justice at any rate. / Wendell Phillips." 5 x 2 1/2 in. (adhesive residue on verso and front right); "An hour of justice / is worth seventy / years of prayers. / Wendell Phillips." 6 x 6 1/2 in. (light soil, scattered marks); "Be just & fear not / Wendell Phillips." 3 1/4 x 1 1/2 in. (light soil, ink faded, light abrasions). GARRISON, William Lloyd (1805-1879). Clipped signature ("Wm. Lloyd Garrison") dated "1879." 4 /12 x 2 1/4 in. (pencil and ink notations on front, light soil). BEECHER, Henry Ward (1813-1887). Clipped signature ("Henry Ward Beecher"). 3 1/4 x 1 3/4 in. (heavy soil front and back, adhesive residue on verso). -- Accompanied by CDV of Beecher and 4 1/2 x 6 1/4 cabinet card of Beecher. [With:] GARRISON, Wendell Phillips (1840-1907). Autograph letter signed ("W.P. Garrison"), as literary editor of The Nation. On The Nation letterhead. New York, New York, 25 June 1894. Garrison writes regarding a potential article for his monthly magazine. [Also with:] 2 engravings, "Eminent Opponents of the Slave Powers" and 'Wendell Phillips." This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 258 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of photographs and other items related to abolitionist figures incl. Wendell PHILLIPS (1811-1884) and Charles SUMNER (1811-1874).

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A group of photographs and other items related to abolitionist figures incl. Wendell PHILLIPS (1811-1884) and Charles SUMNER (1811-1874). BLACK, J. W., photographer. Cabinet card featuring profile bust portrait of Wendell Phillips (toning, spotting, bit of wear to mount). Boston: J.W. Black, ca 1870s. Ink identification to mount recto, photographer's imprint to verso. -- GURNEY & SON, photographers. CDV half portrait of Wendell Phillips (toning, light soiling and wear to mount). New York: Gurney & Son, ca 1860s. Photographer's imprint to verso, pencil identification to recto and verso. -- BLACK, J.W., photographer. Cabinet card portrait of Charles Sumner (toning, spotting, clipped upper edge). Boston: J.W. Black, n.d. Ink identification to mount recto, photographer's imprint to verso. -- SILSEE, CASE & CO., photographers. CDV full standing portrait of Charles Sumner holding a top hat and walking stick (toning, some blotching, discoloration and light wear to mount edges and corners). Boston: Silsee, Case & Co., n.d. Verso bears photographer's imprint along with J.E. Tilton & Co. photograph album manufacturer's label and penciled identification. -- And 3 other photographs including a cabinet card and CDV featuring William Lloyd Garrison, and a cabinet card featuring Henry Ward Beecher. -- Together, 7 photograph portraits of abolitionist figures. The American Anti-Slavery Almanac, for 1842. Vol. II, No. 1. New York: S.W. Benedict, [1842]. 4 5/8 x 7 3/8 in. 12pp. (incomplete). Disbound (significant wear and spotting throughout). Beginning in 1836, the American Anti-Slavery Society utilized almanacs as a means of communicating to Northerners the cruelty of slavery. -- The Liberator. Vol. VI, No. 27. Boston: Isaac Knapp, 2 July 1836. 4pp., 15 x 22 1/4 in. (creasing, spotting, few rips and tears). Ink identified to "Rev. G. B. Perry, East Bradford" upper left. Editor William Lloyd Garrison includes a letter he wrote to the publisher, dated 22 June 1836, regarding a recent abolitionist-opposing bill submitted to the Rhode Island Legislature. -- And the 24 November 1883 issue of Harper's Weekly featuring a portrait of Frederick Douglass that consumes the entirety of the front page. -- Together, 3 publications. [With:] TURNER, J.W., comp. In Memoriam. / Charles Sumner. Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co., 1874. 10 1/2 x 14 in. 2pp. (incomplete). Disbound (Wear and discoloration to edges and corners). Funeral march sheet music featuring lithographed portrait of Sumner on front cover. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 259 - [AFRICAN AMERICANA - EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION]. Church Advocate. Vol. XXVII, No. 21. Lancaster, PA: E.H. Thomas, J.S. Gable, and George Ross, 25 September 1862.

[AFRICAN AMERICANA - EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION]. Church Advocate. Vol. XXVII, No. 21. Lancaster, PA: E.H. Thomas, J.S. Gable, and George Ross, 25 September 1862. 8pp., folio, 11 1/4 x 14 1/4 in. Disbound (chipping, staining to margins, occasional spotting). Page 171 of the issue contains bold headlines, "Important Proclamation by the President / The Slaves of Rebels Proclaimed Free / By the President of the United States…” followed by a complete printing of Abraham Lincoln’s preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. The issue also contains an inside page headline, “General Mitchel and His Negro Spy,” with a report on Sam Gardiner, an enslaved African American who was a spy for the Union during the Civil War (page 166). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 260 - [LINCOLN, Abraham (1809-1865)]. A group of 2 images honoring Lincoln, incl. commemorative albumen print, The Martyr of Freedom. New York: Charles Magnus, 1865.

[LINCOLN, Abraham (1809-1865)]. A group of 2 images honoring Lincoln, incl. commemorative albumen print, The Martyr of Freedom. New York: Charles Magnus, 1865. The Martyr of Freedom. Sixteenth President of the United States. 5 x 7 1/4 in. albumen print on cardstock 10 3/8 x 13 1/4 in. mount (toning, some light soiling to print and mount; edge and corner wear to mount including some surface loss on verso near right center edge). Decorative border and Lincoln's facsimile signature just below his portrait. With the following printed in the lower margin, "Entered According to Act of Congress A.D. 1865 by Chs. (Charles) Magnus in the Clerks Office of the 5th Dist. of N.Y." This print, produced shortly after the assassination of Lincoln, is based on the original portrait of Lincoln (O-55) taken between 1 March and 30 June 1861 possibly by C.D. Fredricks out of New York, James E. McClees, or W. L. Germon, both out of Philadelphia. [With:] 7 1/8 x 9 in. albumen photograph on 8 x 10 in. cardstock mount, featuring an outdoor view of the statue "Emancipation," created by Thomas Ball, depicting Abraham Lincoln holding the Emancipation Proclamation while freeing an enslaved man with broken shackles on his wrists. Washington, DC: J.F. Jarvis, n.d., ca late 19th century (toning, occasional spotting; some edge and corner wear to mount). The day after Lincoln's death, fundraising began for the Emancipation memorial. Formerly enslaved woman Charlotte Scott donated $5 and requested that it be used to erect a monument honoring Lincoln, which led to a campaign involving other emancipated enslaved individuals raising funds. As a result of their efforts, $18,000 was raised for the monument, which still stands in Capitol Hill. Together, 2 images honoring Abraham Lincoln. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 261 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. BRADY, Mathew, photographer. Autographed CDV of John Brooks Henderson (1826-1913), co-author of the 13th Amendment.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. BRADY, Mathew, photographer. Autographed CDV of John Brooks Henderson (1826-1913), co-author of the 13th Amendment. CDV vignetted bust portrait of Henderson on cardstock mount (minor spotting; soiling and wear to mount). Henderson's autograph ("J. B. Henderson") tipped in below image. Brady's imprints to mount recto and verso. John Brooks Henderson served as a senator from Missouri from 1862-1869, during which time he co-authored the 13th Amendment. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 262 - [CIVIL WAR]. [BRADY, Mathew (1822-1896), photographer]. CDV of Gordon Granger, Union general and father of the Juneteenth celebration. New York: E. & H.T. Anthony.

[CIVIL WAR]. [BRADY, Mathew (1822-1896), photographer]. CDV of Gordon Granger, Union general and father of the Juneteenth celebration. New York: E. & H.T. Anthony. 2 1/4 x 3 1/2 in. CDV on cardstock mount featuring vignetted bust portrait of General Granger (light soiling). General Granger (1821-1876) is best known today for issuing General Orders No. 3, conveying the enactment of the Emancipation Proclamation to enslaved persons in Galveston, TX on 19 June 1865 (now celebrated as Juneteenth). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 263 - [POLITICS - RECONSTRUCTION]. The Cincinnati Commercial. Speeches of the Campaign of 1866 in the States of Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky. Cincinnati, OH, 1866.

[POLITICS - RECONSTRUCTION]. The Cincinnati Commercial. Speeches of the Campaign of 1866 in the States of Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky. Cincinnati, OH, 1866. Folio (15 x 20 in.) Marbled boards containing 52 pages (both original marbled boards split through the center with broken corners and some creases and folds, further folds, creases, and splits to the paper, age discoloration and stains scattered throughout). "The Most Remarkable Speeches on Both Sides. Reported for the "Cincinnati Commercial" and Printed from the Stereotype Plates of that Journal." Volume includes speeches from some of the most important political figures of the post-bellum years. Particularly noteworthy are the multiple speeches delivered by General Benjamin Franklin Butler, whose political career following the Civil War was the result of what he perceived to be President Andrew Johnson's weak reconstruction policies and insufficient support for Civil Rights. Also included are speeches from future president James Garfield, Governor Oliver P. Morton, future president General Benjamin Harrison, and General George W. Morgan. These combined speeches cover a broad breadth of subjects crucial to Reconstruction-Era politics, including the fate of the newly liberated African Americans, national debt, the resumption of politics in the South, and more. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 264 - [RECONSTRUCTION]. Attention! Voters! Don't Be Deceived. Every vote for the Republican Ticket is a vote in favor of Negro Suffrage! [New Jersey]: n.p., ca 1867.

[RECONSTRUCTION]. Attention! Voters! Don't Be Deceived. Every vote for the Republican Ticket is a vote in favor of Negro Suffrage! [New Jersey]: n.p., ca 1867. 12 x 18 3/4 in. letterpress broadside (backed with archival fibrous paper, having some areas of loss, some separation along creases, and areas of spotting and dampstaining); matted and framed to 15 3/8 x 22 1/4 in. This campaign broadside urges voters to cast their ballots for Charles T. Molony, declaring that "Every Vote for Charles T. Molony is a Vote Against Negro Suffrage." According to the 1905 Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey, Charles T. Molony served as a New Jersey State Assemblyman, representing Gloucester County, in 1868. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 265 - [RECONSTRUCTION - SUFFRAGE]. The Two Records. Voters. Read and Remember. A Black Record / A Blacker Record. Passaic County, New Jersey. N.d., ca 1867.

[RECONSTRUCTION - SUFFRAGE]. The Two Records. Voters. Read and Remember. A Black Record / A Blacker Record. Passaic County, New Jersey. N.d., ca 1867. Printed broadside advocating for "Negro Suffrage and Negro Equality." Headings and two columns of text surmounted by a woodcut profile of an African American male. Approx. 6 x 18 in. framed to 12 1/2 x 25 in. (not under glass, unexamined outside frame, broadside adhered to white cardboard backing with some adhesive residue visible, light chipping, small loss bottom left not affecting text, loss at bottom left corner). Whereas the 1776 New Jersey state constitution left open the possibility of African Americans (and women) to be voting citizens, in 1807 the New Jersey state legislature restricted suffrage to tax-paying, white male citizens. The broadside offered here discusses the introduction of a measure by state representative Mr. E.A. Stansbury of Paterson, Passaic County, New Jersey, to strike out the word "white" from the constitution of the state. The broadside states that on the 23rd of July [1867] the Radical or Republican State Convention met at Trenton to endorse the Congressional policy of Thaddeus Stevens and negro suffrage. Additionally, Stansbury drafted resolutions amongst which were the following: "That the insertion of the word 'white' in the Constitution of 1844 was a violation of the true principles of Republican government...Pledging ourselves to the eradication of the word 'white' from the Constitution of New Jersey by every legal and honorable means, we also call upon Congress to take measures to induce or COMPEL ALL THE STATES OF THE UNION to establish a just and uniform rule excluding all distinctions of class, race, or color...." Additional resolutions pledge the party to the cause of "impartial suffrage," and identify that as "ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT QUESTIONS TO BE ADJUSTED IN THE APPROACHING CAMPAIGN." The final statement of the broadside states: "It will be seen therefore that by their own declarations on every side, a vote for the Radical ticket this fall is a direct vote for Negro Suffrage and Negro Equality." In 1867-1868, during the height of Reconstruction, the pressing political issue of the day for Republicans was Black male suffrage, and winning approval for it in the North and the American West. As in other states, the New Jersey Republicans were fighting to keep this issue at the forefront of political debate. This broadside was likely produced by New Jersey Republicans as a campaign piece leading up to the pivotal state and national elections of 1868. A historically important broadside reflecting the impassioned post-war discussions on race and suffrage which were occurring at both the state and national level. We locate no copies in OCLC or at auction. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 266 - [RECONSTRUCTION]. A group of documents related to the McKinlay family of South Carolina, incl. Whitefield J. McKinlay, one of the wealthiest Black businessmen in the United States in the early twentieth century.

[RECONSTRUCTION]. A group of documents related to the McKinlay family of South Carolina, incl. Whitefield J. McKinlay, one of the wealthiest Black businessmen in the United States in the early twentieth century. McKINLAY, William J. (1808-1873). Autograph letter signed ("William J. McKinlay") as Register of Mesne Conveyance, Charleston County. 5 February 1871. 1p, 8 x 9 1/2 in. (creasing, toning). McKinlay was the first African American in the nation to hold the office of Register of Mesne Conveyance and was involved in Reconstruction-era South Carolina politics. McKINLAY, Whitefield J. (1852-1941). Two documents, a typed letter signed ("W. McKinlay"), 15 July 1915, related to three properties to be used in bond and mortgage, and an autograph letter signed ("W. McKinlay"), 6 May 1916, regarding a bill. Both documents on "Whitefield McKinlay / Real Estate Loans and Insurance / Notary Public" letterhead. McKinlay was the nephew of William J. McKinlay, and became a prosperous D.C. businessman and realtor. He was also a close friend of Booker T. Washington and associate of presidents including Theodore Roosevelt. [With:] Confederate dated probate document related to the estate of Eliza McKinlay, deceased, which is to be administered by Peter McKinlay. Charleston County, South Carolina. 27 September 1861. The relationship, if any, between Eliza and Peter McKinlay and William and Whitefield McKinlay is undetermined. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 267 - [RECONSTRUCTION]. Labor contract between freedmen and women named "Joe," "Mindo," "Francis," and "Esel," and plantation owner W.W. Raffield. Clarendon District, SC. 16 January 1866.

[RECONSTRUCTION]. Labor contract between freedmen and women named "Joe," "Mindo," "Francis," and "Esel," and plantation owner W.W. Raffield. Clarendon District, SC. 16 January 1866. Partly-printed "Freedman's Contract for 1866...Articles of Agreement between W.W. Raffield and Freedmen and Women whose names are hereunto attached." 1p, 7 3/4 x 12 1/2 in. (creasing, approx. 1 in. tear at top edge line and small tear bottom right). Signed "W.W. Raffield" by William W. Raffield (1824-1901), and by 4 freedmen and women with their marks. Docketed on verso with approval from South Carolina Freedmen's Bureau field officers including Captain Daniel Judson Bradham. The regulation of written labor agreements between planters and freedmen was one of the major activities of the Freedmen's Bureau in South Carolina. Still, post-war labor contracts were structured in accordance with the Southern states' "Black Codes" which attempted to restrict African Americans' freedom, impel them to work for low or no wages, and keep freedmen dependent and subordinate. While the contracts formally outlined terms of employment such as pay, clothing, medical care, the distribution of crops, length of work days, etc., the former enslavers were able to maintain a system of labor which closely approximated the system of enslavement which had existed in the former Confederate states. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 268 - [RECONSTRUCTION]. Manuscript legal document outlining the use of campaign funds by African American politician, abolitionist, and minister, Richard H. CAIN (1825-1887) for an 1870 Charleston, South Carolina, election.

[RECONSTRUCTION]. Manuscript legal document outlining the use of campaign funds by African American politician, abolitionist, and minister, Richard H. CAIN (1825-1887) for an 1870 Charleston, South Carolina, election. Manuscript response in Cain's hand, constituting an "Answer" in the case "State of South Carolina / Charleston County / In Common Pleas / John C. Mallonee vs. R.H. Cain

Lot: 269 - [POLITICS IN AMERICA]. A group of 8 items related to early African American politicians and government officials including Reconstruction-era Congressmen and attorneys.

[POLITICS IN AMERICA]. A group of 8 items related to early African American politicians and government officials including Reconstruction-era Congressmen and attorneys. COBB, James A. (1876-1958). Autograph letter signed ("James A. Cobb") on letterhead of the "Office of the United States District Attorney, District of Columbia, Washington, D.C." 26 February 1913. 2pp, 5 1/4 x 7 in. (creasing, light toning). Accompanied by mailing envelope. Cobb writes to a friend with his condolences on the loss of a family member. Cobb was a prominent African American lawyer who became the first Black man to work as a special assistant in the Department of Justice. He was later appointed a professor of law at Howard University and a Judge in the Municipal Court of Washington, D.C. BRUCE, B.K. (1841-1898). Clipped signature ("B.K. Bruce / Miss."). Bruce was the first African American to serve a full term in the U.S. Senate. RAPIER, James T. (1837-1883). Stamp for Special Tax United States Internal Revenue signed ("James T. Rapier"). 7 x 7 1/2 in. Rapier serve as a U.S. Representative from Alabama from 1873-1875, and later was appointed collector for the IRS. LYONS, Judson Whitlocke (1860-1924). Check signed ("J.W. Lyons"). 5 December 1907. First African American attorney in Georgia who became the leader of Georgia's Republican Party before receiving an appointment to Register of the Treasury in 1898 and becoming one of America's highest ranking African American government officials. [With:] RANSIER, Alonzo J. (1834-1882). 3 page folio legal document related to a case in which Ransier was a defendant. Ransier was the first African American lieutenant governor of the state of South Carolina. Accompanied by a Court of Ordinary Certificate of Administration naming Louisa Ann Ransier, the wife of Alonzo Ransier. -- LEE, Samuel L. (1827-1895). Attorney signed document sent per Lee related to a house deed. 1 July 1880. Lee was a prominent African American attorney and politician in the state of South Carolina. -- PRESTON, Stephen. Clipped signature ("Stephen Preston"). Haiti's Ambassador to the United States from 1870-1884. Preston worked closely with Ebenezer Bassett, America's first African American diplomat. Conditions vary but generally good. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 270 - [ROOSEVELT, Franklin D. (1882-1945)]. A group of 4 items related to Roosevelt's campaign and the support of African American Democratic voters.

[ROOSEVELT, Franklin D. (1882-1945)]. A group of 4 items related to Roosevelt's campaign and the support of African American Democratic voters. The Story of the New Deal and the Negro. [Pennsylvania]: Colored Democratic State Campaign Committee, ca 1938. Folio (290 x 400 mm). Original wrappers (horizontal central crease throughout from old fold, last page with 2 1/2 in. tear near crease, few small rips and tears throughout). This 15-page publication highlights some of the specific benefits the African American population has gained from programs employed by the Democratic federal and state administrations. President Saved His Little Farm. Indianapolis: Indiana Democratic State Central Committee, Hendren Printing Co., Inc., ca 1933. 8vo (129 x 205 mm). Staple-bound original wrappers (vertical central crease throughout pamphlet from old fold, soiling to wrappers, some edge wear throughout). This pamphlet serves as a "Negro Political Handbook For Campaign of 1934," outlining the ways in which the Democratic Party, through its candidates and programs, has helped the African American population. WRIGHT Jr., R.R. Why the Colored Citizen Should Help Re-elect President Roosevelt. Chicago, IL: Colored Division of the Midwestern Region Democratic National Committee, n.d. 8vo (146 x 217 mm). Staple-bound original wrappers (light wear, minor discoloration). Pamphlet uses statistics and specific examples to highlight the New Deal's positive effects on the African American population, praising it thusly: "What the New Deal has done is far beyond our dream. It would take a book many times larger than this little pamphlet to tell the whole story." In Grateful Appreciation to Our Great Commander-in-Chief Franklin D. Roosevelt From the Negroes of Texas. 215 x 279 mm printed broadside (toning, chipping and loss to edges, some separation to horizontal creases). N.p., ca 1944. This broadside features a list of 5 ways in which Franklin D. Roosevelt "and his beloved wife" have helped the African American race, including "3) In the swift and decisive use of the President's powers under the FEPC, in ending the strike of white employees of the Philadelphia Traction System, fomented by negro-baiters and poll-taxers." Text at bottom urges readers to vote to re-elect Roosevelt in the upcoming election on 7 November (1944). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 271 - [AUTOGRAPHS]. A group of 11 autographs from African American politicians and notables, comprising:

[AUTOGRAPHS]. A group of 11 autographs from African American politicians and notables, comprising: SUTTON, Percy E. (1920-2009). Typed letter signed ("Percy"), 20 March 1973. -- DIGGS, Charles C. (1922-1998). Typed letter signed ("Charles C. Diggs, Jr."), 22 January 1965. -- YOUNG, Coleman (1918-1997). Typed letter signed ("Coleman A. Young"). 14 August 1974. -- BROOKE, Edward (1919-2015). Typed letter signed "Edward W. Brooke"), 14 November 1990. -- JORDAN, Vernon (1935-2021). Whitney Moore Young First Day Cover signed ("Vernon Jordan Jr."). -- WATTS, J.C. (b. 1957 ). 5 x 7 in. photograph signed ("JC Watts Jr"). -- RANGEL, Charles (b. 1930 ). 8 x 10 photograph signed ("Charles Rangel"). -- MCHENRY, Donald (b. 1936 ). 5 x 8 in. photograph signed ("Donald McHenry"). BUNCHE, Ralph (1903-1971). Clipped signature ("Ralph J. Bunch"). -- BRIMMER, Andrew (1926-2012). First Day Cover signed ("Andrew F. Brimmer"). -- EVERS, Charles (1922-2020). Typed letter signed ("Charles Evers"). [With:] "Mayor Charles Evers Inauguration" button, Fayette, Mississippi, 7 July 1969. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 272 - [SUPREME COURT] -- MARSHALL, Thurgood (1908-1993). Printed U.S. Supreme Court syllabus signed ("Thurgood Marshall") as Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, [1982].

[SUPREME COURT] -- MARSHALL, Thurgood (1908-1993). Printed U.S. Supreme Court syllabus signed ("Thurgood Marshall") as Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, [1982]. Printed syllabus of the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Village of Hoffman Estates et al v Flipside, Hoffman Estates, Inc. 22pp, approx. 6 x 9 in. (stray mark at "T" in "Thurgood", otherwise clean pages). Thurgood Marshall was the U.S. Supreme Court's first African American jurist, and he served as an associate justice on the nation's highest court from 1967-1991. The Hoffman Estates case concerned efforts by a Chicago suburb to impose licensing requirements on the sale of drug paraphernalia by a local record store, and the vagueness and overbreadth of doctrines as they applied to restrictions on commercial speech. Writing for the majority, Marshall concluded: "Many American communities have recently enacted laws regulating or prohibiting the sale of drug paraphernalia. Whether these laws are wise or effective is not, of course, the province of this Court....We hold only that such legislation is not facially overbroad or vague if it does not reach constitutionally protected conduct and is reasonably clear in its application...." This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 273 - [JACKSON, Rev. Jesse L. (b. 1941 )]. Political ephemera from Jackson's 1984 and 1988 presidential campaigns, comprising:

[JACKSON, Rev. Jesse L. (b. 1941 )]. Political ephemera from Jackson's 1984 and 1988 presidential campaigns, comprising: "The Rainbow Coalition / Jackson / Democrat / President / Register and Vote!" [Illinois], n.d. Approx. 11 x 16 1/2 in. single-sided poster on glossy paper. -- "Vote for / Jesse Jackson / And His / Delegates." N.p., 26 April 1988. 14 x 11 in. single-sided poster. -- "On June 7th, VOTE / for / Jesse Jackson." [California], [1988]. 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. campaign flyer for California Democratic primary. -- "Jackson / President '84." [Washington, D.C.], [ca 1984]. Approx. 3 3/4 x 8 1/2 in. printed trifold campaign brochure. -- "Jesse Jackson / Jesse Jackson's Position on Hispanic Issues." In English and Spanish. [Washington, D.C.], [ca 1984]. -- "Jesse Jackson / Presidente / Mando Decisivo / Un Nevo Rumbo." Newsprint campaign promotional for Spanish-language voters. [Chicago], [ca 1988]. 4pp, Approx. 11 1/2 x 16 3/4 in. [With:] 8 1/4 x 6 in. black and white press photograph showing Jackson surrounded by and talking to a throng of American reporters. Verso with typed captions including "Warming Up in London on the Presidential Trail" and "The Rev Jesse Jackson, the Leading Black Civil Rights Campaigner, In Brixton, London, yesterday." London, [September 1983]. Condition of all items generally good with expected toning, light wear, and occasional creasing. [Also with:] A group of autographed documents and photographs signed by 8 African American elected officials, including: Newark Mayor Kenneth A. Gibson, California Congressman Mervyn M. Dymally, Mississippi Congressman Mike Espy, Maryland Congressman Kweisi Mfume, New York Congressman Floyd H. Flake, New York Congressman Major R. Owens, Illinois Congressman Gus Savage, and Missouri Congressman William "Bill" L. Clay. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 274 - [CIVIL WAR]. A group of photographs of African American subjects, likely family members, highlighted by a sixth plate tintype of a soldier.

[CIVIL WAR]. A group of photographs of African American subjects, likely family members, highlighted by a sixth plate tintype of a soldier. Sixth plate tintype featuring a seated African American soldier wearing a regulation 1858 frock coat and forage cap (severe flaking to plate, few spots of discoloration and some scratches; unsealed.) Housed in a repaired Union case (moderate wear and chipping to edges). -- Sixth plate tintype of an African American woman sitting with her arm resting on a studio end table with fringed cover. (Some bending/creasing to plate, with a few spots/plate imperfections and spotting to mat; unsealed.) Housed loosely in a pressed paper case (surface wear). -- CDV portrait of a young African American man standing and resting his arm on the top rail of a studio chair placed next to him (toning, soiling, spotting; wear to mount). Southbridge, MA: Geo. M. Lovell, ca 1888. Photographer's imprint to verso, along with multiple inscriptions and numbered handstamp. Inscriptions identify the subject as William Robinson of Everett, Massachusetts. -- Together, 3 photographic portraits of African American subjects, possibly family members. Consignor relates the trio was found together.

Lot: 275 - [CIVIL WAR]. CDV of an African American sergeant and private posed with white soldiers in a studio. Philadelphia, PA: O.H. Willard, ca 1864-1865.

[CIVIL WAR]. CDV of an African American sergeant and private posed with white soldiers in a studio. Philadelphia, PA: O.H. Willard, ca 1864-1865. 2 1/4 x 3 5/8 in. CDV on cardstock mount (soiling, discoloration, upper corners clipped; wear to mount edges and corners). Photographer's imprint on verso along with revenue stamp cancelled 3 February 1865. Two African American soldiers stand at center, the one on the viewer's left being a sergeant, armed with an 1840 NCO sword and a Sprinfield rifle musket, wearing a rectangular belt plate and having three chevrons on his sleeve. He also wears a tarred cover on his kepi and an NCO baldrick on his sword. The African American private standing next to him wears an infantry bugle and brass insignia on top of his kepi, and holds his Springfield to one side. The white soldier on the viewer's extreme right is also a private, and also armed with a Springfield. The white soldier to the viewer's extreme left wears a great coat and a slouch hat, and holds what appears to be an 1850 foot officer's sword, indicating he is likely a junior officer. A powerful portrait, showing an African American non-commissioned officer posing in a group with a white soldier of a lesser rank. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 276 - [CIVIL WAR]. Cabinet card featuring an African American in uniform, possibly a Civil War veteran. Boston, MA: Foster, ca 1880s.

[CIVIL WAR]. Cabinet card featuring an African American in uniform, possibly a Civil War veteran. Boston, MA: Foster, ca 1880s. 4 x 5 1/2 in. cabinet photograph on cardstock mount (toning, light-moderate spotting/soiling; wear to mount edges and corners). Credited on mount recto. The subject stands against a studio backdrop painted to look like the deck of a ship. He wears a full uniform including shoulder straps and medal. Though the subject is not identified, he strongly resembles a slightly older subject in another (ca 1890s) Foster cabinet card, who appeared to be a veteran of the Civil War. In that photograph (not included here), the subject wore a Model 1852 sword tucked in his belt and a star on his sleeve, indicating the senior rank of an enlisted boatswain, gunner, carpenter, or master's mate. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 277 - [CIVIL WAR]. A group of engravings presenting scenes and subjects mostly related to enslavement and the Civil War.

[CIVIL WAR]. A group of engravings presenting scenes and subjects mostly related to enslavement and the Civil War. The Fort Pillow Massacre. Chicago, IL: Kurz & Allison, 1892. 27 1/4 x 20 in. (including margins) chromolithograph mounted on linen (toning, restoration/repairs to margins). -- 3 engravings by J.C. Buttre, New York, including: Confederate Generals, Eminent Opponents of the Slave Power, and Confederate Chieftains. 1864. 6 1/8 x 9 1/2 in. engravings (toning, edge wear to each). -- Entrance of the Fifty-Fifth Massachusetts (Colored) Regiment into Charleston, Feb. 21 1865. N.p., n.d. 9 x 5 3/4 in. engraving (toning). -- J.C. Calhoun. N.p.: Edwards, eng., n.d. 6 3/8 x 9 3/4 in. engraving after daguerreotype by Mathew Brady. -- Battle of Bunker's Hill. New York: Johnson, Fry & Co., 1866. 7 1/8 x 10 3/4 in. engraving including armed African American at lower right (light toning to margins). [With:] 13 illustrations depicting subject matter relative to enslavement, abolition, and African American troops, each removed from mid-to-late 19th century publications, including Harper's Weekly and Illustrated London News (toning, occasional soiling, chipping and loss to edges). Together, approx. 20 engravings and magazine illustrations. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 278 - [CIVIL WAR]. A group of 10 illustrated covers featuring political cartoons depicting African American subjects.

[CIVIL WAR]. A group of 10 illustrated covers featuring political cartoons depicting African American subjects. Cover illustrations highlight themes and subjects including John Bull, Jefferson Davis, secession, contraband, and cotton, with captions such as "The playing out of Secession;" "John Bull 'don't see it;'" "Music by the 'Contra-Band;'" "Uncle Sam sends his bird after Traitor Jeff;" and "Dixie's Land." Makers include Magee, Philadelphia; S.C. Upham, [Philadelphia]; and J.G. Wells, New York. Together, 10 covers, each 5 1/2 x 3 1/8 in. or smaller. Conditions vary, though largely fair. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 279 - [CIVIL WAR]. A group of 10 illustrated covers featuring political cartoons depicting African American subjects.

[CIVIL WAR]. A group of 10 illustrated covers featuring political cartoons depicting African American subjects. Cover illustrations highlight themes and subjects including Jefferson Davis, General Butler, George Washington, Uncle Sam, the Mason & Dixon Line, southern chivalry, contraband, and royalty, with captions such as "One of the F.F.V's after his Contraband. General Butler 'can't see it;'" "A King for the South;" "Wait 'till the War is Over;" "I'se Contraband;" and "Southern Chivalry. Richmond, Va." Makers include Magee, Philadelphia; Mumford & Co., Cincinnati; J.E. Haves, [Boston]; and D. Murphy's Son, New York. Together, 10 covers, each 5 5/8 x 3 1/8 in., or smaller. Conditions vary, though largely fair. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 280 - [CIVIL WAR]. A group of 9 illustrated covers featuring political cartoons depicting African American subjects.

[CIVIL WAR]. A group of 9 illustrated covers featuring political cartoons depicting African American subjects. Cover illustrations highlight themes and subjects including Jefferson Davis, Fort Monroe, General Butler, contraband, and secession, with captions such as "The Result of Secession;" "Secession;" "Dixie's Land;" and "Volunteer Sappers and Miners from the F. F. V.—or Merchandise Contraband of War." One by D. Murphy's Son, New York. Together, 9 covers, each 5 5/8 x 3 1/8 in., or smaller. Conditions vary. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 281 - [CIVIL WAR]. Manuscript sermon signed by J. Romeyn Berry, including discussion of the evil of slavery. Kinderhook, NY, 26 September 1861.

[CIVIL WAR]. Manuscript sermon signed by J. Romeyn Berry, including discussion of the evil of slavery. Kinderhook, NY, 26 September 1861. 8 x 6 1/4 in. pages bound in brown paper covering with blue ribbon (separations, loss to extremities, brown paper covering very brittle). Covering unfolds to reveal ink inscription reading "Last day Sermon Isiah [sic] 58:1. Cry aloud, spare not &c. J. Romeyn Berry. Kinderhook Sept. 26. 1861." 22 page manuscript sermon begins with a transcription of Isaiah 58:1, "Cry aloud, spare not, lift up thy voice like a trumpet, and shew my people their transgressions and the house of Jacob their sins." Near the end of the sermon, Berry deals with the evil of slavery, writing, in part: "Only convince the community that the words of God sanctions the principle of American Slavery and you have done two things - You have degraded the Gospel below the standard of the Deists religion, and you have prepared men for all sorts of wrongs and violence toward each other. For if I have a right under whatever pretence to rob an innocent man of his liberty and his labor of his wife and his children, then what have I not a right to rob him of!...That the South should strive to sustain such a code is not strange for flesh and blood and souls even of slaves have become 4 times as valuable & profitable now as they were 30 years ago. But that the free south would be defiled with a widespread desperate effort to justify and canonize wrong is one of the wonders and curiosities of the century." Reverend J. Romeyn Berry offered the prayer and tribute at President Martin Van Buren's funeral services at Lindenwald in 1862. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 282 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A pair of letters from J. W. McConaughy of Little Rock, AR, to the Honorable C. J. McRae, providing 1861.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A pair of letters from J. W. McConaughy of Little Rock, AR, to the Honorable C. J. McRae, providing 1861. Each letter 7 1/2 x 9 1/2, matted and framed together to 25 x 18 in. (not examined out of the frame). Creasing to both, discoloration and several ink spots to 6 April letter. In his letter of 20 March, McConaughy writes to inform McRae that Arkansas will likely vote in favor of Secession In part: "Our convention has just agreed to submit the question of 'Secession' or 'cooperation,' to the people in August. The submissionists[?] had a majority & the above was the best that our friends could do, and indeed it is regarded here as a Secession triumph. Only it creates to [sic] much delay. I shall be glad to be remembered to you while you are at Montgomery in the way of documents. By the way I am going to canvass the state & wish you would send me some statistical matter to us &c. You may set Arkansas down as going with the South..." By 6 April, anti-secessionist arguments had made headway, potentially disrupting McConaughy's former prediction. He explains, in part: "We are in a death struggle here. The submissionists to carry the Northern & Nor-Western portion of our state, where there are but few slaves & the heaviest popular vote, are endeavoring to array the non-slaveholders against Secession they tell them that the whole difficulty was brought about by slaveholders for their benefit, & that the non-slaveholder will have to do the fighting & receive no benefit &c. Will you do me the favor to send me documents to meet this difficulty addressed to the non-slavehold? The questions are new here & those who could prepare documents are too firmly engaged in the canvass to write. I shall begin a general canvass of the state in a few days." The state of Arkansas seceded from the Union exactly one month later, on 6 May 1861, with a vote of 65-5 in favor of the ordinance of secession. This came as a surprise to some, as many Arkansans publicly professed strong sentiments for the Union, especially those living in the non-slaveholding regions of the Ozarks and the western portion of the state. What likely turned the tide of opinion was Lincoln's 15 April call for troops, 3 days after the attack on Fort Sumter.

Lot: 283 - [CIVIL WAR]. A group of 6 muster rolls for 1st Maryland Cavalry, Companies A through F, each naming African American servants. 31 December 1861 through 28 February 1862.

[CIVIL WAR]. A group of 6 muster rolls for 1st Maryland Cavalry, Companies A through F, each naming African American servants. 31 December 1861 through 28 February 1862. Lot comprised of 6 muster roll documents, approx. 10 1/2 x 4 in. folded, 30 1/2 x 21 in. unfolded (all items numbered at a later date over the Company marking, staining and toning at the edges, some flaking, splits along folds.) Muster rolls providing some insights into the readiness and organization of a Cavalry Regiment that would later distinguish itself at the Battle of Brandy Station and Gettysburg. All six muster rolls list the personnel of their respective companies during the first two months of 1862 with each listing servants employed and attesting that no soldiers are being used as servants. All six list the "Complexions" of company servants and indicate a substantial African American presence among them. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 284 - [CIVIL WAR]. Confederate document recording the impressment of an enslaved person for work on "Public Defenses on the Chattahoochee River." 17 June 1863.

[CIVIL WAR]. Confederate document recording the impressment of an enslaved person for work on "Public Defenses on the Chattahoochee River." 17 June 1863. Receipt for payment in the amount of $41.00 from the State of Alabama to enslaver "Y.G. Mallone" for the impressment of an enslaved man to help build Confederate fortifications on the Chattahoochee River near Abbeville, Alabama. 1p, 5 x 7 3/4 in. (creasing, light toning). The 1860 U.S. Federal Census Slave Schedule indicates that Young Gressum Malone of Henry County, Alabama, (1807-1866) enslaved 14 men, women, and children. The Confederate States of America required enslavers to loan their enslaved persons to the Confederate Army, resulting in enslaved African Americans being forced to work at ordnance factories and arsenals, fortifications, building roads, and other heavy labor occupations. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 285 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION - CIVIL WAR]. Partly printed appraisal for lease of enslaved man issued by the Confederate States. Charleston, SC, 1 December 1864.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION - CIVIL WAR]. Partly printed appraisal for lease of enslaved man issued by the Confederate States. Charleston, SC, 1 December 1864. 7 1/2 x 5 1/4 in. (sight) partly printed document, matted and framed, 13 1/2 x 12 in. (light folds, unexamined outside frame). Partly printed document, which states, "We have examined the following named Slaves, furnished the Confederate States for service on the Coast, and estimate their value as follows..." With name and value of the enslaved person, ("Berry, $4000") owner's name ("Danl Fowler"), and district ("Greenville") accomplished in manuscript. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 286 - [CIVIL WAR]. 3 war-date letters, highlighted by ALS from Captain William H. Silsby, 10th Iowa Infantry, discussing the arming of formerly enslaved African Americans. Camp near Jacinto, MS, 17 August 1862.

[CIVIL WAR]. 3 war-date letters, highlighted by ALS from Captain William H. Silsby, 10th Iowa Infantry, discussing the arming of formerly enslaved African Americans. Camp near Jacinto, MS, 17 August 1862. Collection of three letters composed during the American Civil War written by Captain William Silsby of the 10th Iowa Infantry, Private George N. Requa of the 15th Kansas Cavalry, and one unknown author. William Silsby served as a captain in the 10th Iowa Infantry Regiment. In his letter from "Camp near Jacinto Miss" dated 17 August 1862, just one month before his regiment was engaged at the Battle of Iuka, he writes to his wife, Helen, about financial matters, the position of his encampment, and his opinion of the suggestion to arm African Americans. Captain Silsby categorically rejects the idea, and explains his position in detail. In part: "I think we will be able to close the war without arming the negros. President Lincoln (and I speak of him respectfully) has decided that we may use them as labourers, which I think is right, I do not think that it would be good policy to arm them indiscriminately and place them in our ranks as soldiers...I think our ranks would not be strengthened by such soldiers." Silsby served the Union cause for 4 years of active service and retired at the rank of full colonel. After the war, he resettled his family in Salem, Oregon, where he worked as a postmaster. He died on 8 May 1901 and was interred at Ashland City Cemetery in Ashland, Oregon. George N. Requa enlisted with the 15th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry, and penned a letter home on 10 September 1863, just a month before his regiment was organized in Leavenworth. In the brief and poorly handwritten letter, Requa eagerly awaits the arrival of his regiment's horses and weapons. The letter provides a rare glimpse into the mind of a soldier awaiting the arming of his unit for a bloody and ongoing war. George N. Requa served through his enlistment and survived the war, passing on 23 June 1911. He is interred in Fairview Cemetery, Bates County, Missouri. The final letter was penned by an unknown soldier whose signature is illegible in itself, but retains a legible date of 6 December 1864. The contents of the letter make clear that its author served aboard a river boat hauling vital cargoes, and conveys his confidence that he will come to no harm. Its author further mentions his remorse at failing to move his family to Pittsburgh prior to serving. Finally, and most notably, he discusses rumors that the Confederates might be on the verge of forcing enslaved persons to fight with a new draft. In part: "All we want is time to finish this war. But let um [sic] draft for all I care drafted men & n[------] just stand on the same level here espicaly [sic] the drafted men freemen ought always to volunteer..." Overall, a mysterious letter with fascinating subject matter. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Early Photography Collection of Jules Martino, Silverton, Oregon

Lot: 287 - [CIVIL WAR]. Letter from Maurice Lamprey, 10th New Hampshire Infantry, in which he rejects anti-emancipation sentiments and describes the wrecks of the USS Cumberland and Congress. Newport News, VA, 11 March 1863.

[CIVIL WAR]. Letter from Maurice Lamprey, 10th New Hampshire Infantry, in which he rejects anti-emancipation sentiments and describes the wrecks of the USS Cumberland and Congress. Newport News, VA, 11 March 1863. 9 1/4 x 7 1/4 in., creased along old folds, few ink smears. With postally used envelope addressed to Mr. Clarance Lamprey of Concord, NH, and cancelled at old Point Comfort, VA. This letter to his brother, Clarance, is dated three days before Private Lamprey's regiment, the 10th New Hampshire, would be dispatched to Norfolk and Suffolk, on 14 March 1863. Lamprey describes the fortifications visible from the barracks, along with the grisly remains of USS Cumberland and USS Congress, still visible from the shore after they were destroyed during the Battle of Hampton Roads, Virginia, in March of 1862. He further discusses anti-emancipation sentiment in the Union, including a town-hall meeting within the 10th New Hampshire about whether it would be best to end the war with compromise or force of arms. Lamprey himself favored the latter position, and objected to the anti-emancipation sentiments expressed by his peers. He further elucidates his own thoughts on how African Americans might help the war effort. Maurice Lamprey enlisted with the 10th New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry on 8 August 1862, serving with that unit through the Siege of Suffolk before transferring into the US Signal Corps. Lamprey survived the war, and died on 14 February 1912. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 288 - [CIVIL WAR]. Letter from Captain Henry R. Sibley in which he expresses his pro-Emancipation sentiments. New Iberia, Louisiana, 29 November 1863.

[CIVIL WAR]. Letter from Captain Henry R. Sibley in which he expresses his pro-Emancipation sentiments. New Iberia, Louisiana, 29 November 1863. 2pp, 8 x 12 1/2 in. Addressed to John F. Dodge of Boston, Massachusetts, and written by Captain Henry R. Sibley (faded ink overall, some toning to all folds, and chipping to edges). Accompanied by original envelope postmarked New Orleans, LA, 3 December 1863. Letter discusses the elections in Charlestown in Boston, Massachusetts, with Sibley discussing the pro-emancipation sentiment within his regiment. Henry R. Sibley left behind his work in business in the state of Massachusetts to join the US Army during the American Civil War. Initially serving with the 29th Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers, he spent the majority of the war serving in assorted Commissary and Subsistence departments. For this position he received a promotion to Captain. Sibley served in this capacity during the Red River Campaign and the disastrous Battle of Sabine Crossroads (Battle of Mansfield). He was commended for keeping his command in good order in the latter action, permitting vital resources to be shifted back that later permitted the Union to wage a successful defense at the Battle of Pleasant Hill. On 16 December 1865, he received a promotion to Brevet Lieutenant Colonel of Volunteers, having returned to his native Massachusetts to resume his life after the war. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 289 - [CIVIL WAR]. Printed plea for recognition from a Black camp follower from Louisiana, who served with the 16th New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry. N.d.

[CIVIL WAR]. Printed plea for recognition from a Black camp follower from Louisiana, who served with the 16th New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry. N.d. 6 x 5 3/5 in. printed plea for recognition from a Black soldier from Louisiana who served with the 16th New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry (short tear and crease along the bottom edge, some toning). James T. Taylor of Bradford, New Hampshire, formerly of Louisiana, described in brief his service to the 16th Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers between January 1st, 1863 and the Siege of Port Hudson (22 May - 9 July 1863). During this period, Taylor attests that he cooked and washed, and looked to the comforts of the officers and men of the regiment. During the last years of the 19th Century, an array of grassroots movements emerged that sought pensions for formerly enslaved persons who had helped the Union secure victory in the Civil War. By submitting records of their service, such as this one, African Americans hoped to prove that their service merited some form of pension owing to the dangers they faced and the hardships endured during the Union Army's many arduous marches. This lot provides a rare glimpse into the experiences of African American "Camp Followers", whose contributions to the Union victory remain little examined. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 290 - [CIVIL WAR]. WILD, Edward Augustus (1825-1891). Collection of items related to abolitionist, recruiter, and commander of "Wild's African Brigade," incl. wartime CDV and letter referencing the attack on Fort Wagner.

[CIVIL WAR]. WILD, Edward Augustus (1825-1891). Collection of items related to abolitionist, recruiter, and commander of "Wild's African Brigade," incl. wartime CDV and letter referencing the attack on Fort Wagner. Autograph letter signed ("E.A.W."), Folly Island, S.C., 17 September [1863]. 2pp, 5 x 8 in. (large portion dampstained, two very small losses in lower third of letter). Letter is written on the blank areas of a printed "General Order" issued at Morris Island, S.C. on 2 September 1863. Wild writes to his mother just a few days after the African American troops he commanded took part in the heroic capture of Fort Wagner and Fort Gregg at Morris Island, South Carolina. Initially Wild discusses the anniversary of his amputated arm, then riding through violent storms during an attack by Confederate troops and falling into a ten-foot deep entrenched fortification while still on his horse. He closes sharing the news of their recent battles won, and the bravery of his men: "Wagner & Gregg have fallen. Some of my men were of the foremost to rush into them. They being out all night in the trenches, armed themselves with pikes from the ditch of Wagner, and rushed upon Gregg, ahead of everything." [With:] Letter signed ("Edwd. A. Wild / Col. 35th Mass. Vols" to the Honorable Mr. Ogden, Consul General for U.S.A., at Quebec, Canada, requesting a testimonial on the personal character of William Nicholas Reed of Ross, Canada West. Boston, 13 April 1863. On letterhead from "Commonwealth of Massachusetts / executive Department." 2pp, 6 x 7 1/2 in. (creasing). -- Letter signed ("Edwd. A. Wild / Brig. Gen. Vols. / Late Capt. Co. A 1st Mass. Vols." A recommendation for William T. Damon for the post of commissary. Boston, 4 May 1863. 1p, 3 x 6 in. (creasing, residue on verso). [Also with:] War-date CDV of Wild by Whipple, 96 Washington Street, Boston. Undated, but image was taken prior to the September 14, 1862, Battle of South Mountain after which a wound necessitated the amputation of Wild's left arm. Brigadier General Edward A. Wild was a Harvard-educated physician who early in the war was commissioned a captain in the 1st Massachusetts Infantry. After suffering a severe wound at the Battle of Seven Pines, he was later promoted to lieutenant colonel of the 35th Massachusetts Infantry. At the Battle of South Mountain he suffered a wound that necessitated the amputation of his left arm. Returning home to recuperate, Wild performed recruiting duties including for the 54th Massachusetts Infantry regiment. When he returned to field duties, he took command of a brigade of black infantry known as "Wild's African Brigade" which was composed of the 55th Massachusetts Infantry, a sister regiment of the famed 54th Mass., and the 2nd and 3rd North Carolina Colored Volunteers (later the 36th and 37th USCT). This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 291 - [CIVIL WAR]. XXV Corps badge, US Colored Troops.

[CIVIL WAR]. XXV Corps badge, US Colored Troops. 1 5/8 x 1 5/8 in. Diamond-shaped red wool badge with remnants of a border (scattered stains, some fraying to edges, weakening stitching). Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Nick Periut of Army of Tennessee Relics. The XXV Corps was unique in that it was made up almost entirely of African American troops. These soldiers had previously belonged to the X Corps and XVIII Corps, both of which were reorganized on 3 December 1864, with white units becoming part of the XXIV Corps and black units becoming the XXV Corps, under the command of Major General Godfrey Weitzel. The new XXV Corps served with distinction during the waning days of the Petersburg Campaign. Its main noteworthy action was being the first command to occupy Richmond on 3 April 1865. In May, the Corps was sent to Texas to serve as the "Army of Occupation" against Napoleon III's French presence in Mexico. The XXV Corps was disbanded in January 1866. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 292 - [ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A northern preacher's letters concerning teaching soldiers from the 15th United States Colored Infantry Regiment as well as students at a freedmen's school in Nashville, Tennessee. 1863-1864.

[ENSLAVEMENT & ABOLITION]. A northern preacher's letters concerning teaching soldiers from the 15th United States Colored Infantry Regiment as well as students at a freedmen's school in Nashville, Tennessee. 1863-1864. A group of 5 letters, spanning 6 January 1863 - 8 June 1864, written to family members by Ira Clinton Bristol (1799-1879?) while serving as an itinerant preacher and teacher

Lot: 293 - [CIVIL WAR]. Archive identified to African American soldier William H. Wade, 20th US Colored Troops, incl. correspondence and war-date documents.

[CIVIL WAR]. Archive identified to African American soldier William H. Wade, 20th US Colored Troops, incl. correspondence and war-date documents. Approximately 17 documents, spanning 1863-1872, associated with William H. Wade (1839-1864) of Blooming Grove, Orange Co., N.Y., and the efforts of his widow and her attorney to secure a "colored bounty" following Wade's death while serving with the 20th Regiment USCT in the Department of the Gulf. War-date documents include: Partly-printed letter submitted to Mrs. William Wade by the 20th USCT on behalf of her husband notifying her of eligibility for a "Relief Fund" for the aid of the families of soldiers in the U.S. Army, New York, 15 February 1864, an accompanying certificate of enlistment issued by Headquarters of the 20th Regiment, U.S. Colored Troops, 13 November 1863; and a partly-printed pass request for Mrs. William H. Wade to visit her husband on Riker's Island where the company was being organized, [1864]. Additional documents appear to have been gathered by Attorney Darwin W. Esmond, Attorney at Law, of Newburgh, New York, who was working on behalf of Wade's widow and his only child to obtain a pension. Among Esmond's correspondence are letters to the regimental surgeon seeking confirmation of Wade's death in the New Orleans prison and to Wade's widow with instructions on securing testimonies from Wade's fellow soldiers on his service, as well as a copy of a record of the remarriage of Wade's widow. Government documents from the Treasury Department, State of New York, and Department of the Interior are also present. Letters and documentation demonstrate the laborious, years-long process of verifying a soldier's service, acquiring mandatory affidavits, and submitting forms as part of the pension and bounty pay claims. U.S. Colored Troops Military Service Records indicate that Wade was drafted. He was a 25-year-old laborer when on 13 November 1863 he enlisted as a private with Co. C, 20th US Colored Infantry Regiment. Company muster rolls indicate Wade was present with his regiment throughout 1864, but absent for May/June 1865 "absent sick in Genl. Hosp. N.O. La." The roll for July/August remarks that Wade was discharged, and "Final Statements given" as per requirements for a deceased soldier. The 20th was attached to the Department of the East, Defenses of New Orleans, the District of Western Florida and Southern Alabama, and then again to Defenses of New Orleans. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the James Milgram, M.D., Collection of Broadsides, Ephemeral Americana, and Historical Documents

Lot: 294 - [CIVIL WAR]. Correspondence with African American soldier William Jefferson, 8th US Colored Troops, incl. a letter from his mother, and a circular issued to the 20th and 26th Regiments USCTs.

[CIVIL WAR]. Correspondence with African American soldier William Jefferson, 8th US Colored Troops, incl. a letter from his mother, and a circular issued to the 20th and 26th Regiments USCTs. Letter from Private William H. Jefferson, who was drafted for service with the US Army on 30 July 1863, and placed in the 8th Regiment Colored troops (toning overall, some tears at edges and corners). At the time he penned his letter, the 8th was located at Hilton Head, South Carolina. In his letter, Private Jefferson described the difficulty and ill health that others of his regiment suffered during their travels aboard ship en route to South Carolina. Though he assured his mother that he was in good health, Private Jefferson's fortunes did not last. According to his records, he contracted Typhoid Fever, and died in the regimental hospital on 13 July 1863. An accompanying letter relays the grim news to William's mother (torn corner with cracking at the seams reinforced with tape and toning overall). Originally sent by her, and dated 28 May 1864, she offered William some details of how his family were doing, and the health of his own loved ones. A brief note was written at the bottom in a different hand reading "This letter was recd. while he was yet alive but too weak to understand it. His last words were "Mother! Mother! O.H. Norton." Third letter of the lot has no legible signature, but retains a legible date of 1 October 1863, and records the experiences of its author in the area of New York, New York (small tear to corner, split along folds, toning.) Themes discussed include: prices for assorted goods inflated due to war; fishing; foraging, and the execution of deserters. Also included is a printed circular issued to the 20th and 26th Regiments of US Colored Troops from New York City, dated 29 February 1864, and informing the personnel that passes to visit Riker's Island would be issued Wednesday and Thursday of that week (some tearing to seams, stains, and toning). This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the James Milgram, M.D., Collection of Broadsides, Ephemeral Americana, and Historical Documents

Lot: 295 - [CIVIL WAR]. Partly printed discharge document for Private. Philip Pledger, Company B, 20th Regiment United States Colored Troops. New Orleans, 1 June 1865.

[CIVIL WAR]. Partly printed discharge document for Private. Philip Pledger, Company B, 20th Regiment United States Colored Troops. New Orleans, 1 June 1865. One page, 4to, 8 1/2 x 10 3/4 in., partly printed document (heavy creasing with some separation, spotting, taped repair and adhesive residue to verso). Undersigned, with docketing to recto. As recorded here, Pledger enlisted in January of 1864 for 3 years' service, and was mustered into Company B of the 20th USCT. He was discharged for disability on 1 June 1865 at "Corps d'Afrique U.S. Gen. Hosp." Pledger, born in Pennsylvania, was described as having a "Black complexion, Black eyes," and "Black hair," and being a barber by trade. The 20th Regiment United States Colored Infantry was organized at Rikers Island, New York on 9 February 1864, mustering under the command of Colonel Nelson B. Bartram. The 20th was ordered to New Orleans in March, arriving on the 20th and moving to Pass Cavallo, TX in April. It then moved back to Louisiana, through the winter of that year, until being ordered to West Pascagoula, FL on 26 December. It returned to New Orleans in February of 1865, where it remained until June. The regiment was mustered out on 7 October 1865 at Nashville, TN. It suffered a total of 285 losses during service. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 296 - [CIVIL WAR]. Letter from Adjutant M. Herbert Wood, 23rd USCT, to his sister Mollie concerning her deserter husband.

[CIVIL WAR]. Letter from Adjutant M. Herbert Wood, 23rd USCT, to his sister Mollie concerning her deserter husband. WOOD, M. Herbert. Autograph letter signed. Headquarters, 23rd U.S. Colored Troops. "In the field Near Petersburgh Va." 16 July 1864. 4pp, 8 x 5 in. (ink smear to outer surfaces, yellowing around creases, some flaking along folds and edges). Letter from 2nd Lieutenant M. Herbert Wood, 23rd US Colored Troops to his sister, Mollie, discussing her lingering health woes and the desertion of her husband. M. Herbert Wood was a permanent resident of the state of Alabama when the Civil War began, and left his family behind in order to fight on the side of the Union. At the time he wrote this letter, Wood served as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 23rd US Colored Infantry. In the letter, he discussed an upcoming promotion that was finalized on July 19, 1864 to 1st Lieutenant, when Wood transferred to the 22nd US Colored Infantry. He was further promoted to Captain on December 31, 1864, and served as the Assistant Adjutant Inspector General of the 1st Division 25th Army Corps during the absence of Captain J. H. Joust. Wood spent most of his time with the 23rd and 22nd on leave of absence due to illness, accumulating more than 180 days absent during one year. In May of 1865, he requested leave to ascertain the condition of the wife and child he had been compelled to leave behind when he joined the war to fight for the Union, afterward submitting a surgeon's note requesting to resign on account of "Physical Disability." This was granted, and Wood was honorably discharged with the rank of Captain on July 18th, 1865. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 297 - [CIVIL WAR]. Manuscript record of clothing issued to soldiers of Co. A, 62nd United States Colored Troops. N.p. [Benton Barracks, Missouri ?], November 1864.

[CIVIL WAR]. Manuscript record of clothing issued to soldiers of Co. A, 62nd United States Colored Troops. N.p. [Benton Barracks, Missouri ?], November 1864. Log of clothing given to 36 identified members of Company A, 62nd U.S.C.T. by 1st Lieutenant Aaron M. Adamson. November 1864. 1p, approx. 16 x 16 1/2 in. (creasing, light soil and wear). Columns list the name of soldiers, articles of clothing received, a monetary designation, soldier's signature line each indicating "his mark," and signature of the witness. The first black regiment from Missouri was recruited in June 1863 at Benton Barracks in St. Louis. More than 500 men from central Missouri enlisted, nearly all of which had been formerly enslaved and, as per Missouri law, were legally forbidden to learn to read and write. The regiment was designated the First Regiment of Missouri Colored Infantry, but on March 11, 1864, was redesignated the 62nd U.S. Regiment of Colored Infantry. The 62nd earned the distinction of firing the last volley of the Civil War, on May 13, 1865, between White’s Ranch and the Boca Rita in Texas at what became known as the Battle of Palmito Ranch. Despite the regiment's military successes, it faced ongoing racism and discrimination even from within Union ranks. A medical board convened in October 1864 found that more than a third of three Missouri black regiments - the 62nd, 65th, and 67th U.S. Colored Infantry - had perished since enlistment, mostly from various undiagnosed diseases. Others died due to poor sanitation, lack of proper food, and harsh working conditions. Thinly clad soldiers without shoes and hats were forced to engage in hard labor and suffered illness and death disproportionately from their white counterparts. This log, recorded just a month after the medical board convened, may represent a response to the findings of the medical board and an effort to ameliorate the conditions endured by USCT. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 298 - [CIVIL WAR]. Partly-printed document regarding the "final statements" for Private James Jones, Co. C, 77th Regiment, USCT. War Department, Adjutant General's Office. Washington, D.C., 10 June 1864.

[CIVIL WAR]. Partly-printed document regarding the "final statements" for Private James Jones, Co. C, 77th Regiment, USCT. War Department, Adjutant General's Office. Washington, D.C., 10 June 1864. 1p, approx. 5 x 8 in. (creasing, light soil). Signed ("F.W. Taggard") by Assistant Adjutant General Frank W. Taggard. Taggard requests of Commanding Officer, Co. C, 77th U.S. Colored Infantry ("Formerly 85th"), Fort St. Philip, Louisiana, that outstanding final statements related to deceased soldier Private James Jones be forwarded without delay. HDS indicates that Private James Jones enlisted as a private on 3/11/1864 at New Orleans, and mustered into Co. C, USCT 85th Infantry. His date and method of discharge are not indicated. The 85th Infantry was organized in April 1864 from the 13th Corps d'Afrique Infantry and was attached to the Department of the Gulf. The regiment consolidated with the 77th USCT approximately a month later, remaining in the Department of the Gulf and serving in the Defences of New Orleans at Fort St. Philip. Though the exact identity of Private Jones is uncertain, he is likely one of thousands of formerly enslaved men who escaped to join the Union cause, enlisting in Louisiana's Corps d'Afrique before consolidating into USCT. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 299 - [CIVIL WAR]. Pay Voucher for Private Miles Logan of the 11th Regiment US Colored Troops.

[CIVIL WAR]. Pay Voucher for Private Miles Logan of the 11th Regiment US Colored Troops. Partly printed document, 1p, 21 x 10 in., "Volunteer Descriptive List and Account of Pay and Clothing of Private Miles Logan Company B. 11th Regiment U.S. Colored Troops" (five fold creases with cracking along folds buttressed with tape, some flaking and age discoloration). Recorded as a "farmer" (though most likely formerly enslaved) prior to the American Civil War, Private Miles Logan was born in Johnson County, Arkansas, and reported his age at 18 years old when he enlisted in the 11th Regiment of the United States Colored Infantry. Logan joined and enrolled at Fort Smith, Arkansas on 28 December 1863, and appears present on the muster rolls of his unit until July and August of 1863, during which time he worked as a teamster with the hay train. Upon his return to the unit, Logan was unfortunate enough to have lost one issued knapsack, haversack, and canteen. A stop was then placed upon his pay for the next six months, but Logan was with his unit when it saw action during the Battle of Gunther Prairie on 24 August 1864. A note confirming this fact appears on the document in the paymaster's hand, along with further notes regarding articles he received from the government. The clothing issued to Logan by 25 March 1865 and recorded in this document was calculated at up to $105.72, with the margins listing some additional clothing provided. Private Logan remained with the 11th until it was folded into the 113th US Colored Infantry Troops in April, 1865. This latter unit was then mustered out on 9 April 1866. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 300 - [CIVIL WAR]. Cowden, Robert, Col. A Brief Sketch of the Organization and Services of the Fifty-Ninth Regiment of United States Colored Infantry, and Biographical Sketches. Dayton, OH: United Brethren Publishing House, 1883.

[CIVIL WAR]. Cowden, Robert, Col. A Brief Sketch of the Organization and Services of the Fifty-Ninth Regiment of United States Colored Infantry, and Biographical Sketches. Dayton, OH: United Brethren Publishing House, 1883. 8vo (7.5x5.5 in). (Rebound, with dampstaining, occasional tears, and spotting to pages.) Contemporary binding with marbled book boards, black calf lettering-piece gilt. 293pp. Rebound cardboard volume containing a narrative of the 59th Regiment of United States Colored Infantry, and the printed contents of a circular letter sent by the author to surviving officers of that regiment. FIRST EDITION of Colonel Robert Cowden's account of the 59th Regiment of United States Colored Infantry, along with the printed contents of a circular letter sent by the author to surviving officers of the regiment. Colonel Robert Edmund Cowden enlisted with the 56th Illinois volunteer Infantry on February 1, 1862, with that unit first seeing action during the Siege of Corinth. Cowden rapidly ascended the ranks, eventually ascending to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel 1 May 1864 in order to command the 59th Regiment of United States Colored Infantry. The challenges and accomplishments of that unit are detailed within this volume, along with assorted details about the training and disposition of the unit's personnel, and Cowden's own high praise of the 59th's performance during the brutal Battle of Brice's Cross Roads. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 301 - [CIVIL WAR - UNITED STATES COLORED TROOPS]. A group of 4 documents related to officers of USCT and Buffalo Soldier regiments including 2 ALsS from General Edward W. Hincks.

[CIVIL WAR - UNITED STATES COLORED TROOPS]. A group of 4 documents related to officers of USCT and Buffalo Soldier regiments including 2 ALsS from General Edward W. Hincks. HINCKS, Edward Winslow (1830-1894). Two autograph letters signed ("Edw. W. Hincks"), both addressed to Mr. George Nichols, Esq. of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 1 June 1874, 2pp, 7 3/4 x 9 1/2 in. (creasing, toning). Hincks writes regarding a deed to a lot and the potential of making improvements to the property. Headquarters, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 5 September 1874. On "The National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers" letterhead. 1p, 8 x 10 1/2 in. (creasing, toning). Hincks requests that Nichols attend to the premium on a life insurance policy. Accompanied by mailing envelope bearing "National Soldiers' Home" return address. Hincks served with distinction during the Civil War, enlisting almost immediately after the onset of the war. He was WIA at Glendale, VA, and Antietam, later promoted to Brigadier General of Volunteers, and commander of Pt. Lookout POW camp before joining the Army of the James commanding a division of United States Colored Troops in field operations. [With:] PICKLER, John A. (1844-1910). Autograph letter signed ("J.A. Pickler") on letterhead of "House of Representatives U.S." Faulkton, South Dakota. 20 March 1900. 1p, 8 x 10 1/2 in. (toning, corner wear, light soil). Pickler writes to a representative of a railroad company seeking passes for travel from Des Moines to Chicago. Pickler's was a representative to the U.S. House of Representatives from 1889-1897. During the late stages of the Civil War, a 21-year-old Pickler was given command of the 138th South Carolina Regiment of Colored Troops and promoted to major. [With:] HUGO, William H. (1833-1905). Pay voucher for 1st Lieut. William H. Hugo, 9th U.S. Cavalry. 21 January 1875. 1p, 8 1/2 x 11 in. (creasing, light toning). Hugo was a Civil War veteran who was injured at the Battle of Gettysburg. After the war he commanded the 9th U.S. Cavalry regiment of the United States Army, one of the four segregated African American regiments known as the "Buffalo Soldiers." This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 302 - [LATE INDIAN WARS]. Cabinet card of Isaac Brown, likely 24th US Infantry, taken while at Fort Logan, February 1899.

[LATE INDIAN WARS]. Cabinet card of Isaac Brown, likely 24th US Infantry, taken while at Fort Logan, February 1899. 4 x 5 1/2 in. cabinet photograph on cardstock mount (print and mount heavily worn, with damage/loss to left edge of print, fading, and soiling). An uncredited, outdoor portrait of an African American soldier shown standing with rifle in hand in front of a brick building. Penciled notations on mount verso identify the subject as Isaac Brown and the location as "Fort Logan, Feb. 1899." Also included is a list of places Brown was presumably stationed, which appears to include Mexico, Honolulu, Manila, and Nagasaki (some notations difficult to discern). Although his regiment is not identified, research indicates that Brown served with the 24th US Infantry Regiment, which was at Fort Logan in February 1899. The 24th US Infantry was one of the four so-called Buffalo Soldier regiments formed in 1869. From its inception through 1898, the 24th served throughout the western US, with missions that ranged from garrisoning frontier posts to fighting Native Americans and guarding the border between the United States and Mexico. In 1899 the regiment deployed to the Philippines to help suppress a guerrilla movement in the Philippine–American War. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 303 - [BUFFALO SOLDIERS]. 2 photographs of "Buffalo Soldiers," Company D, 24th US Infantry, one credited to African American photographers J.P. BALL & SON, Helena, Montana. Ca 1902-1904.

[BUFFALO SOLDIERS]. 2 photographs of "Buffalo Soldiers," Company D, 24th US Infantry, one credited to African American photographers J.P. BALL & SON, Helena, Montana. Ca 1902-1904. 6 1/8 x 4 in. photograph on 7 x 5 in. cardstock mount, showing members of Company D, 24th US Infantry, with rifles in hand, standing before a series of buildings (toning, some soiling to recto/verso, edge and corner wear to mount incl. loss to top right corner). Verso ink stamp of "J.P. Ball & Son; Photographers, Main Street, Helena, Montana." -- 6 1/8 x 4 in. photograph on 8 x 6 in. cardstock mount, showing 9 soldiers from Company D, 24th US Infantry, seated on the stairs of an unknown building (toning, light soiling to recto/verso, light edge and corner wear to mount). The 24th US Infantry was one of the four so-called Buffalo Soldier regiments formed in 1869. From its inception through 1898, the 24th served throughout the western US, with missions that ranged from garrisoning frontier posts to fighting Native Americans and guarding the border between the United States and Mexico. In 1899 the regiment deployed to the Philippines to help suppress a guerrilla movement in the Philippine–American War. Headquarters and first battalion, including Companies A-D, arrived at Fort Harrison in Helena, MT, on 25 May 1902. They remained there until December 1905 when the entire regiment received orders to return to the Philippines. These images likely date ca 1902-1904 because the company wears the uniform that was replaced with a new pattern between 1903 and 1904. James Presley Ball (1825-1904) is one of the most renowned African American photographers at one point owning the largest photographic gallery west of the Appalachians. When visiting White Sulphur Springs, Virginia in 1845 he met John B. Bailey, an African American daguerreotypist from Boston where he acquired the passion and skill of photography. He opened a studio in Cincinnati later that year, and though it was unsuccessful, he continued his art with studios in Pittsburgh and Richmond and traveled as an itinerant daguerreotypist. In 1849, he reopened a studio in Cincinnati. He hired his younger brother Thomas Ball to work as an operator, and in 1852 hired his future brother-in-law Alexander Thomas to work with him. By 1857, their gallery was one of the grandest in the United States attracting notables including Frederick Douglass. In 1887 Ball was chosen as the official photographer of a celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation held in Minneapolis-St.Paul. In 1888, he moved to Helena, Montana with his son where he operated a studio for several years before moving again in 1892 to Seattle. Based on the likely dates of the photographs offered here, they were almost certainly taken by Ball's son, James Presley Ball, Jr. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 304 - [WORLD WAR I]. Soldier's tunic issued to a member of the 92nd US Infantry, "Buffalo Soldiers."

[WORLD WAR I]. Soldier's tunic issued to a member of the 92nd US Infantry, "Buffalo Soldiers." US Model World War I wool soldier's tunic issued to a member of the 92nd U.S. Infantry, the "Buffalo Soldiers." The tunic bears original buttons throughout, and features a handmade "Buffalo" division patch constructed of three pieces and hand-sewn to the left shoulder above a red discharge stripe and green overseas service stripe. Accompanied by a heavily worn World War I Victory Medal with "Meuse-Argonne" and "Defensive Sector" clasps which has been separated from the pin which remains above the left breast. An aluminum signet ring, possibly trench art, is pinned to the left breast pocket flap. Overall condition generally good with some slight mothing and moth holes at the bottom of the left breast pocket. The "Buffalo Soldier" patch did not fluoresce under black light. "Buffalo Soldiers" fought with distinction during WWI, most notably at the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 305 - [WORLD WAR I]. Photograph of the Harlem Hellfighters, African American troops. New York: Guarantee Photo Studio, operated by noted Harlem photographer James VANDERZEE (1886-1983), ca 1919.

[WORLD WAR I]. Photograph of the Harlem Hellfighters, African American troops. New York: Guarantee Photo Studio, operated by noted Harlem photographer James VANDERZEE (1886-1983), ca 1919. 9 x 7 in. (including margins) unmounted silver gelatin photograph, likely a period copy (some soiling throughout, adhesive residue to lower margin, light wear to edges and corners). Lower right corner of image embossed "Guarantee Photo Studio 109 West 135th St. N.Y." Verso with additional Guarantee Photo Studio stamps and pencil inscription reading, "Studio of James VanDerZee." Featured in the image are African American soldiers, most likely of the 369th Infantry Regiment, known as the "Harlem Hellfighters." An all-Black regiment, the 369th fought heroically on the front lines in France during World War I and received an enthusiastic welcome from civilians at the victory parade held in 1919 upon their return home. African American photographer James VanDerZee was one of a few photographers who photographed the parade. The image featured here appears to have been taken in a rural setting. Research indicates that this may have been taken in 1918 when the Harlem Hellfighters were training in France. They were documented by the International Film Service at that time, and the original image may have been produced then. A rare, possibly undocumented image. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 306 - [WORLD WAR I]. Colored Man is No Slacker. Chicago: E.G. Renesch, 1918.

[WORLD WAR I]. Colored Man is No Slacker. Chicago: E.G. Renesch, 1918. 16 x 19 3/4 in. (light corner and edge wear, colors vivid and bright). Recruitment poster encouraging the enlistment of African American men in the US Army during World War I. Background features an African American infantry unit marching with a 42-star flag. A new recruit bids his wife farewell.

Lot: 307 - [WORLD WAR I]. True Blue. Chicago: E.G. Renesch, 1919.

[WORLD WAR I]. True Blue. Chicago: E.G. Renesch, 1919. 16 x 20 in. chromolithograph (corner and edge wear incl. some creasing and minimal corner loss, colors vivid and bright). Recruitment poster showing a family admiring the portrait of the patriarch in uniform hanging over the mantle. The portrait is festooned with American flags and flanked by portraits of George Washington and Woodrow Wilson, a portrait of Lincoln hangs nearby. Over one million African Americans responded to draft calls, and roughly 370,000 African American men were inducted into the army.

Lot: 308 - [WORLD WAR I]. A group of 3 items identified to African American Corporal Sherman Terry, incl. correspondence and real photo postcard.

[WORLD WAR I]. A group of 3 items identified to African American Corporal Sherman Terry, incl. correspondence and real photo postcard. Autograph letter signed by Terry to his mother and father in Cleveland, Ohio. Camp Sherman, Ohio. Undated [ca 14 November 1917]. 3pp, approx. 5 x 6 1/2 in. (toning, creasing). Accompanied by original mailing envelope with cancellation dated 14 November 1917. Terry writes his parents regarding his circumstances at Camp Sherman, stating in part: "Lots of white men have left the camp for Little rock Arcansas this week there is now colored doctors here and Lots more colored men. Our company has got a football team and they have got me in it...." [With:] Incomplete letter (missing page, losses especially at top edge line) from Terry to unidentified recipient, also written from Camp Sherman. -- Real photo postcard showing two unidentified African American soldiers posed before a draped American flag and a sign "We Do We Go from here?" (soil, creasing, discoloration). Sherman "Ernest" Terry, Sr. (1896-1967) enlisted on 27 October 1917 and served until his honorable discharge on 18 March 1919. He was initially part of the 8th Colored Detachment, 158th Depot Brigade, 83rd Division, then served with Co. C, 365th Infantry Division attaining the rank of sergeant. The 365th participated in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, a major Allied offensive and one of the deadliest campaigns in US Army history. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 309 - [WOMEN] -- [MILITARIA]. Collection of commendations and ephemera associated with Mrs. Bettye Campbell Ray (1937-2022), Department of the Navy. Ca 1950s-1970s.

[WOMEN] -- [MILITARIA]. Collection of commendations and ephemera associated with Mrs. Bettye Campbell Ray (1937-2022), Department of the Navy. Ca 1950s-1970s. Small archive consisting of the following: one (1) 8 x 10 black and white photograph of an African American woman set to receive a set of papers from a male, unidentified but with "Official U.S. Navy Photograph" on verso; two documents from November 1959 associated with an "Award Recommendation for Superior Accomplishment" presented to Bettye D. Campbell; "Department of the Navy / Bureau of Naval Weapons / Certificate of Commendation" for Bettye D. Campbell, 1 March 1960; a "Letter of Appreciation" to Mrs. Betty [sic] C. Ray from "Air-500C," 5 December 1977; and a "Letter of Commendation" for Mrs. Bettye Ray from Assistant Commander for Material Acquisition, 11 May 1978. Bettye Delores Campbell Ray was born in Wilmington, North Carolina, but spent most of her life residing in Washington, D.C. Her career with the Department of the Navy appears to have started as a young woman in her twenties and lasted more than twenty-years. Ray's Naval commendations cite her as a "self starter" possessing a positive attitude, dedication to her work, and valuable knowledge all of which helped her achieve outstanding results. Mid-twentieth century military commendations for women are scarce at auction, particularly for an African American woman. Ray is buried at Arlington National Cemetery. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 310 - [TUSKEGEE AIRMEN]. A group of 14 Tuskegee Airmen signatures.

[TUSKEGEE AIRMEN]. A group of 14 Tuskegee Airmen signatures. Tuskegee Airmen signatures inked on white, unlined note cards, each 5 x 3 in., including: Claude Palette (2), 301st Fighter Squadron and Army Primary Flight Instructor; Charles A. Lane, Jr. (2), 99th Fighter Squadron; Charles McGee (2), 302 Fighter Squadron; Luther E. McIlwain (2); Eldridge Williams, 332nd Fighter Wing; James Warren; Leroy Bowman, 301st Fighter Squadron; Edward E. Tillman, 477th Bomber Group; Utota Knox, 302 Fighter Squadron; and Curtis C. Robinson, 99th Fighter Pilot. Condition generally good. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from the Augustana Collection

Lot: 311 - [AFRICAN AMERICANA - NATIVE AMERICANS - WWII]. World War II correspondence with Maud Morgan of Hillburn, NY, a member of the "Jackson Whites/Ramapough Mountain Indians."

[AFRICAN AMERICANA - NATIVE AMERICANS - WWII]. World War II correspondence with Maud Morgan of Hillburn, NY, a member of the "Jackson Whites/Ramapough Mountain Indians." Collection of 11 Vmails and 3 letters addressed to Maud Morgan of Hillburn, NY, from four soldiers primarily thanking her for keeping up correspondence and passing along family updates and stories. (Toning to letters, creases to all Vmails, some scattered stains and spots.) Subjects include: Christmas time; personal health; the weather, and their relief at hearing from home. Items were previously part of a large collection of letters written by Howard Emmons Morgan, Jr. to his family passing on any details of his life in the Army that could get past wartime censors. The Morgan family came from the Ramapough Mountain Indians of the Ramapo Mountains in Hillburn, New York, a unique ethnic group descended from Dutch settlers, African Americans, and Native Americans. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 312 - [BUFFALO SOLDIERS]. A group of 32 stereoviews of African American soldiers incl. 9th and 10th Cavalry Regiments. Ca 1890s-1900s.

[BUFFALO SOLDIERS]. A group of 32 stereoviews of African American soldiers incl. 9th and 10th Cavalry Regiments. Ca 1890s-1900s. Lot comprised of 32 stereoviews featuring African American troops training at camp, in combat, and participating in parades and reviews, published by various makers including Keystone View Company, F.J. Jarvis, Strohmeyer & Wyman, and Griffith & Griffith. Each stereoview is titled in the lower margin of the mount (generally good condition, occasional toning, soiling, edge and corner wear to mounts). Highlighted titles/subjects include: 9th Cavalry of Colored Troops in Parade. -- Colored Veterans of the 15th Regt., 369th Infantry, Marching up Fifth Avenue, New York City. -- Litter Bearers, Medical Detachment, 8th Regt. of Colored Men. -- Lewis Machine Gun Equipment of 8th Regt. Colored Troops. -- Roosevelt Guard - A Company of Colored Troops, 8th Regiment. -- Machine Gun Company, Chicago Regiment of Colored Troops. -- Colored Troops returning from France on S.S. Aquitania, New York. -- The Original Buffaloes, 367 Infantry Colored Troops Rifle Practice, Camp Upton, NY. -- Troop D, 9th Cav. on the Trunk of the Fallen Monarch, Mariposa Grove, Cal. -- Industrial Parade, Booker Washington School, Tuskegee Ala., Mrs. McKinley in near carriage. -- 23rd Kansas Volunteers embarking for home. Santiago, Cuba. -- Eighth US Infantry ready to embark for Cuba. -- Troop K, 10th US Cavalry, on the March. -- Multiple images of Troop A, Ninth US Cavalry, "Famous Indian Fighters." -- And others. [With:] 3 additional stereoviews featuring African American subjects on plantations, including examples by Kilburn & Bros. and Underwood & Underwood. Together, 35 stereoviews with African American subject matter.

Lot: 313 - [BUFFALO SOLDIERS]. A large collection of photographs and documents related to 19th-20th century African American military service.

[BUFFALO SOLDIERS]. A large collection of photographs and documents related to 19th-20th century African American military service. Lot of 73 silver gelatin photographs ca. mid-19th to mid-20th century depicting African American military personnel from the American Civil War, Indian Wars, Spanish-American War, World War I, and World War II. Notable in the archive are images of Company B 758th Heavy Tank Battalion taken at Fort Bragg, North Carolina in October, 1948. Also included are documents including: discharge paper of Private John Robinson of the 9th US Cavalry discharged September 15, 1874; pension issued to a 104th Regiment US Colored Troops veteran dated 1912; and the discharge papers of Corporal Benjamin Wilson dated 1919. Items range from 5 x 3 in. to 11 1/2 x 14 in. (some creases and folds along the corners with flaking backing, some water discolorations, and few examples of splitting down the middle). Additional imagery includes: panoramic photo of the 310th Quartermaster Fumigation & Bath Battalion Major C.W. Doubleday, Battalion Commander, taken at Camp Ellis, Illinois in September, 1943; ten African American members of the 247th Ord. Amm. Co. photographed in front of a captured Japanese marked tire; General Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., the first African American Brigadier General; picture post cards of soldiers addressed to family members; unit photographs; training photographs; and personnel including members of the US Navy, US Army, Medical Corps, and US Army Air Corps. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 314 - [WORLD WAR II]. Photo album and insignia belonging to African American soldier.

[WORLD WAR II]. Photo album and insignia belonging to African American soldier. Folio (16 x 11 in.) World War II-period and family photo album of US Army Soldier Ernest Butler, who served during World War II. Contains more than 250 photographs taken at home and abroad, most approx. 2 1/2 x 3 1/ in. (Album pages are flaking and torn at the ties. Leather cover cracking and flaking along the edges with torn corners.) Album features handwritten notes recording the names of subjects including family members and brothers in arms. Included are images taken in Germany; destroyed enemy equipment; a group of German POWs aboard a truck unceremoniously entitled "a pack of krauts"; a series of images collectively titled "going home" depicting Butler's long journey back to the United States; post-war family portraits; a collection of post-war photos of friends, family, and children; three WWII era uniform patches including Artillery patch. A touching collage of photographs depicting the life of one of the 125,000 African Americans who served overseas during World War II. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 315 - [VIETNAM]. A group of approx. 120 photographs assembled by African American soldier Vernon Clifton Battel, many taken while serving in Vietnam.

[VIETNAM]. A group of approx. 120 photographs assembled by African American soldier Vernon Clifton Battel, many taken while serving in Vietnam. 12 x 10 in. bound photo album with green fabric cover marked “MEMORY OF SOUTH VIETNAM“ above an enclosed Sampan and a coastal map of Vietnam belonging to US Army veteran Vernon Clifton Battel. (Flaking and yellowing of scrap book pages, splits forming through the covers, age discolorations to photos, Polaroid photos separating, glue has broken down behind photos leaving them loose in the album.) Consists of approx. 120 photographs including images of Battel in Vietnam, and at US Army installations in the USA; multiple photographs of Battel taking the taxi in Vietnam; images of the barracks and the decorations set up by members of his unit, including posters of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., popular musicians of the time, and vintage pornography; images of his family; and photos of home. Also included is his Selective Service Registration Certificate. Blank opening pages are covered with touching farewells and contact information from Battel's comrades. A bound testament to the memory of an African American soldier. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 316 - [WORLD WAR II]. Archive identified to African American medical officer Captain Clark McRay Valentine, incl. photographs, documents, insignia, and related ephemera.

[WORLD WAR II]. Archive identified to African American medical officer Captain Clark McRay Valentine, incl. photographs, documents, insignia, and related ephemera. Lot comprised of 3 scrapbooks (two bound, one loose) and assorted papers and militaria relating to the life of Captain Clark M. Valentine (1905-1988), US Army Medical Corps, including his work in the Civilian Conservation Corps

Lot: 317 - [MILITARIA - VERNACULAR]. Photograph album identified to the Carter family. Ca mid-to-late 20th century.

[MILITARIA - VERNACULAR]. Photograph album identified to the Carter family. Ca mid-to-late 20th century. 15 1/4 x 13 1/4 in. modern scrapbook identified to the Carter Family, including Mary Frances and Clenton Elgan Carter, originally from Illinois, containing over 250 silver gelatin photographs ranging in size from 2 x 2 1/2 in. to 8 x 10 in., as well as programs, pamphlets, memorial cards, and other ephemera saved by a family member. The photographs and related ephemera are mounted recto/verso to thin cardstock inserts. The scrapbook documents multiple generations of the Carter family, and contains a combination of personal family photographs, both formal portraits and informal snapshots, including wedding photographs, images taken for school or sporting events, and photographs with military subject matter, with some subjects identified on the album insert or an accompanying note. Several photographs are identified to Clenton Elgan Carter, including approx. 15 images that document his time in the military, ca 1940s-1950s. A Brize-Norton Air Force Base certificate enclosed with the album indicates that Clenton E. Carter served as a sergeant and completed the course of instruction for Non-Commissioned Officers in December 1954, and at least 4 photographs document a formal event at the Brize-Norton Air Force Base showing Sergeant Carter and fellow officers. Several photographs show Carter and his family in England, including an image taken at the Royal Air Force Station in Staffordshire. Carter's ID card as "Captain of Port, Chicago, 9th Naval Dist." is also enclosed. Additional images of note include: Photograph of an African American man and two teen-aged girls standing in a shoe store accompanied by caption, "I think this is a shoe store our family ran in Texas." -- Several family snapshots, including a group of images of Clenton Carter's son Duane getting ready to go camping with his Boy Scout troop in Idlewild, CA. -- Photograph of jazz and pop singer Billy Eckstine, which may be signed. Together, a scrapbook containing more than 250 photographs and ephemera. Condition generally good. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 318 - [ADVERTISING]. Red Cross Cotton, From Start to Finish. New Brunswick, NJ: Johnson & Johnson, 1894. Petre, Schmidt, & Bergmann, lithographers, New York.

[ADVERTISING]. Red Cross Cotton, From Start to Finish. New Brunswick, NJ: Johnson & Johnson, 1894. Petre, Schmidt, & Bergmann, lithographers, New York. 30 x 21 in. chromolithograph (including margins), printed directly on board, framed, 33 x 24 in. (soiling throughout, scattered surface abrasions, puncture near top margin). An advertisement for Johnson and Johnson's Red Cross Cotton, depicting enslaved African Americans working in a cotton field. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 319 - TROOP, Miriam, artist. The Saturday Evening Post. 15 June 1940. "Rain on Laundry Day."

TROOP, Miriam, artist. The Saturday Evening Post. 15 June 1940. "Rain on Laundry Day." 22 x 28 in. lithographed poster (very good, mounted on linen). An African American woman puts out her hand to catch a raindrop in the midst of hanging up the laundry to dry. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 320 - [ADVERTISING]. Hy-Beaute Hair Dressings placard. Atlanta, GA: Hy Beaute Chemical Co., ca early 1950s. [With:] Approx. 90 Valmor product labels featuring African American models.

[ADVERTISING]. Hy-Beaute Hair Dressings placard. Atlanta, GA: Hy Beaute Chemical Co., ca early 1950s. [With:] Approx. 90 Valmor product labels featuring African American models. 9 1/2 x 13 1/2 in. poster printed in red, blue, and brown (approx. 1 1/2 in. tear extending down from top edge down, otherwise minor chips and punctures, toning to edges). Atlanta, GA: Hy-Beaute Chemical Co., n.d. Advertises three products for "falling hair and itching scalp," including "Special Double Strength Hair Dressing," "Slik-Down Pomade," and "Smokeless Pressing Oil." Hy-Beaute advertised in the Black press from 1946-1958, and this example is similar to ads distributed by the company during the early 1950s. [With:] 96 colorfully printed labels for products from Valmor Products Company and its subsidiaries, Lucky Brown, Madam Jones, and Famous Products, many featuring illustrations of African American models. Chicago, IL, ca 1930s-1940s (overall good, unused condition, with a few creases or spots of surface wear or discoloration to some labels). Products include Lucky Mojo Jockey Club Toilet Water, Kiss Me Again Mouth Wash, White Rose Cold Cream, Tress-O-Klean (for cleaning "hair attachments"), Pressing Oil, Hot Oil Shampoo Treatment, Hair Dressing Pomade, Lemon Fragrance Vanishing Cream ("Cream will disappear leaving skin brighter in appearance"), Peachy Brown Foundation Cream, Lightning Fast Quick Brightener Cream ("Brightens Appearance of Skin"), Special Black Pressing Compound ("For Use with Hot Comb or Pincers"), No Kink Hair Dressing, Pearly White Tooth Powder, and others. -- 3 5/8 x 5 5/8 in. price list booklet for Valmor and Sweet Georgia Brown Products. -- 6 1/2 x 3 5/8 in. printed envelope for Lucky Lure Solid Perfume. The Chicago-based Valmor Company, begun in 1926, often targeted African American consumers with its products, and employed local African Americans as warehouse workers, salesmen, and even artists Charles Clarence Dawson and Jay Paul Jackson to create ads and labels for packaging. Valmor was purchased by New York's R.H. Cosmetic Corporation in 1985. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 321 - [FASHION - BEAUTY]. A group of 60 items, highlighted by photographs of fashionable subjects, some by Shotski Jones, images of the Sapphire Girls, and Miss Black Universe program.

[FASHION - BEAUTY]. A group of 60 items, highlighted by photographs of fashionable subjects, some by Shotski Jones, images of the Sapphire Girls, and Miss Black Universe program. 8 silver gelatin photographs, 8 3/4 x 10 in., capturing events hosted by African American female social organizations as well as other outings and galas, ca 1950s (toning, occasional spotting, light edge and corner wear). Two photographs are credited to H.S. Rhoden of Chicago, IL, the first showing a group of Black women dressed in fancy white gowns, standing around a table with refreshments. A "Modelites" sign is displayed on the wall behind the group. Second photograph features a group of well-dressed women, including the "Sapphires Queen for a Day," who is seated at center wearing a crown and robe. Two additional photographs of the fashionable "Sapphire Girls" are included, one of which is credited to Cleodia H. Lyles, Chicago, IL. The remaining images lack a studio imprint. [With:] 51 silver gelatin photographs, including several "samples" and "proofs" of African American subjects ranging in size from 2 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. to 4 x 5 in. (toning, occasional spotting, some with surface residue, edge wear). Eight proof photographs include the verso ink stamp of Shotski Jones Studio, Trenton, NJ. Jones was a well-known African American photographer operating out of Trenton, and a collection of his photographs are held at Emory University in Atlanta, GA. [Also with:] The First Annual Miss Black Universe, Northern California Pageant Finals. Beautiful, Young, Gifted, and Black. Paramount Theatre, Oakland, CA. 27 July 1979. 8 1/2 x 11 in. program plentifully illustrated with photographs of the contestants and celebrity guest judges, as well as advertisements for local businesses including Kenny Hall International "Cosmetics for Black Women" (light wear). Together, 60 items. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 322 - [CRIME & PUNISHMENT]. A group of 3 wanted posters of African American men issued in St. Louis, MO, Detroit, MI, and Montgomery, AL. Ca 1900s-1930s.

[CRIME & PUNISHMENT]. A group of 3 wanted posters of African American men issued in St. Louis, MO, Detroit, MI, and Montgomery, AL. Ca 1900s-1930s. Wanted for Murder in this City. St. Louis, MO, 10 July 1906. 8 3/4 x 10 3/4 in. poster (toning, soiling, creasing, edge wear, loss to top right corner, multiple tape repairs to verso). A poster seeking out two men wanted for murder, identified as Stewart Thomas and Frank Townsend, "both colored, who on the night of the fourth instant stabbed and instantly killed with a knife Nathaniel Bell, also colored, in this city." A "good likeness of Frank Townsend" is included at center, with physical descriptions of Stewart Thomas and Frank Townsend included below. Issued by G.G. Gillaspy, Acting Chief of Police. A companion wanted poster issued by the St. Louis Chief of Police featuring a portrait of Stewart Thomas was offered in Freeman's I Hindman's African Americana Auction, 23 February 2022, Lot 188. [With:] 2 handbills, 8 x 8 in. (center folds, light staining, creasing and some chipping to edges). Each with a photograph of the subject and set of fingerprints alongside a description, criminal record, and caution. Includes: John Wells, wanted for murder by the Detroit, MI, Police Department, 21 May 1940. -- Floyd Lanier, escaped convict, with $50 reward offered by the State Convict Department, Montgomery, AL, 1928. Together, 3 items. This lot is located in Cincinnati. Property from a 35-Year Collection from the Southern United States

Lot: 323 - [BOXING]. World's Championship Battle, July 4, 1910 - Round 14. Featuring Jack Johnson and Jim Jeffries.

[BOXING]. World's Championship Battle, July 4, 1910 - Round 14. Featuring Jack Johnson and Jim Jeffries. 16 x 11 in. enlarged photographic print on 19 3/4 x 15 in. cardstock mount with printed title in lower margin, World's Championship Battle July 4, 1910-Round 14 (right edge of print partially separated from mount, short tear to print near top right corner, edge and corner wear to mount). A photographic depiction of the 14th of 15 rounds in the legendary Heavyweight Champion fight between former champion James Jeffries and then reigning and first African-American champion Jack Johnson. Rightly dubbed the "Fight of the Century", the boxing match between reigning Heavyweight Champion Jack Johnson, and former Champion James Jeffries was one of the most significant sporting events in history. Staged in front of over 18,000 people in at a specially constructed venue in Reno, Nevada, Johnson's victory against the previously undefeated Jeffries was a critical moment in race relations. Jeffries had retired in 1904, but emerged from retirement in an effort to defeat Johnson and ensure that the Heavyweight title was held by a white man. Media coverage of the time featured openly racist sentiments against Johnson, with betting odds skewed heavily in favor of Jeffries. But after fifteen rounds and over an hour of fighting, Johnson had successfully worn down his opponent and unleashed an assault that repeatedly knocked Jeffries down. Johnson reigned victorious, but in the aftermath, race riots broke out all across the United States that resulted in the deaths of up to 20 people and the injury of hundreds more. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 324 - [SPORTS - BOXING - BASEBALL]. A collection of 14 items, most related to African American boxers Joe Louis and Cassius Clay.

[SPORTS - BOXING - BASEBALL]. A collection of 14 items, most related to African American boxers Joe Louis and Cassius Clay. 5 items related to Joe Louis, including: Joe Louis Punch. Wooden crate, 9 x 10 1/2 x 16 1/4 in. (wear consistent with age and use). Information on the side indicating that the punch was bottled by Sea-Ly Bottling Co., Cleveland, OH. -- Joe Louis Punch bottle cap. -- Jimmy

Lot: 325 - [BASEBALL]. "Philadelphia Stars" Negro League pennant. [With:] Photographs of the "Clowns Baseball Club" and Emmett Ashford, first Black umpire in Major League Baseball.

[BASEBALL]. "Philadelphia Stars" Negro League pennant. [With:] Photographs of the "Clowns Baseball Club" and Emmett Ashford, first Black umpire in Major League Baseball. Philadelphia Stars. Ca 1933-1952. 23 3/4 x 7 1/2 in. red felt pennant with a strip of white felt stitched to the left edge with four red tassels. Featuring a green, white, and orange screen-printed image of a baseball player sliding into home plate with the catcher standing behind the plate (light split in felt near pointed edge, else very good). An identical pennant is held by the National Museum of African American History and Culture. [With:] Nationally Famous Negro American League Clowns Baseball Club. 10 x 8 in. heavily retouched silver gelatin print (some bends, diagonal crease to lower left corner, edge and corner wear). The Indianapolis Clowns, a Negro American League baseball team, was in operation for 59 years and is the longest playing black professional team in US history. -- [NORENBERG, Darryl, photographer]. 8 x 10 in. silver gelatin photograph of Emmett Ashford, the first Black umpire in Major League Baseball (light creasing and wear to edges). While not stamped, this is the work of Darryl Norenberg. Together, 3 items. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 326 - [BASEBALL]. A group of 8 pinback buttons promoting Negro League baseball teams. Ca 1930s-1940s.

[BASEBALL]. A group of 8 pinback buttons promoting Negro League baseball teams. Ca 1930s-1940s. 8 pinback buttons, approx.1 3/4 in. diameter and smaller. Includes buttons representing the following baseball teams: N.Y. Black Yankees (2). -- Kansas City Monarchs (1). -- Baltimore Elite Giants (1). -- Cuban All Stars / Baseball Champions (2). -- Button promoting "Colored All-Stars vs. N.Y. Yankees" (1) -- Button promoting "All Stars / Baseball Champions" (1). The specific dates of the buttons are unclear, but they were likely issued during the height of the Negro Leagues. The teams represented in the lot were home to some of the greatest players of the era including Jackie Robinson who played for the Kansas City Monarchs in 1945 and Satchel Paige for the Black Yankees in 1941 and the Monarchs in 1935 and 1939-1947. Robinson famously broke the color line and became the first African American to play in Major League Baseball when he joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. Paige, who had played alongside Robinson on the Monarchs team of '45, would be able to enjoy the benefit of integration when he debuted with the Cleveland Indians in 1948, becoming the oldest man ever to debut in the MLB. Together, 8 pinback buttons. Condition generally good, with toning, occasional soiling, wear consistent with age and use. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 327 - [BASEBALL]. A group of 2 Jackie Robinson pinback buttons.

[BASEBALL]. A group of 2 Jackie Robinson pinback buttons. Jackie Robinson. 1 3/4 in. dia. pinback button featuring portrait of Robinson against a yellow background. -- Jackie Robinson / Team for Rockefeller. New York City, NY, J. Freides Co., [1964]. 2 1/8 x 2 1/8 in. diamond-shaped pinback button. Promotes Jackie Robinson's support of Nelson Rockefeller's bid for presidency. -- Together, 2 pinback buttons in generally very good condition. Jackie Robinson famously broke baseball's color line in 1947 when he started at first base for the Dodgers on 15 April 1947, and remarkably won Rookie of the Year. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

Lot: 328 - [BASEBALL]. A group of 3 Leroy "Satchel" Paige buttons.

[BASEBALL]. A group of 3 Leroy "Satchel" Paige buttons. Leroy (Satchel) Paige. 1 3/4 in. dia. pinback button featuring portrait of Paige. -- Leroy "Satchel" Paige. 1 3/4 in. dia. pinback button featuring portrait of Paige in a Cleveland Indians uniform, with red, white, and blue ribbons and medal comprised of baseball/crossed bats suspended below, overall 5 in. ln. -- St. Louis Browns. Satchel Paige. 1 x 1 3/4 in. pencil/pen button topper featuring portrait of Paige (some toning to button). -- Together, 3 buttons. Condition generally good with light wear. Leroy Robert "Satchel" Paige (1906-1982) is regarded as one of the greatest pitchers in the history of the Negro Leagues. He enjoyed the benefit of integration when he debuted with the Cleveland Indians in 1948, becoming the oldest man ever to debut in the MLB. This lot is located in Cincinnati.

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